Who's used 0w-16 in something that doesn't spec it?

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1,441
Location
CA
Originally Posted by Ifixyawata
Originally Posted by jayg
Originally Posted by billt460
Originally Posted by 69Torino
Maybe when all the 0w-16 spec'd cars start tossing rods out the sides of their block Autozone and Advance Auto will clearance the 0w-16 for $3.15 a jug.
Should be coming up quite quickly. Seeing as the factory engineers never tested it in anything beyond 5,000 miles.
You think it was only tested for 5,000 miles? LOL Engines are stress tested for far longer than that.
This is all the same doom and gloom that came with the increasing usage of 0/5w-20.
0w16 is the new water. Long live 0w20!
 
Messages
1,306
Location
Rabbit Creek, Alaska
Originally Posted by CharlieBauer
0w16 is the new water. Long live 0w20!
2006: 0w20 is the new water long live 5w30 1986: 5w30 is like water long live ..... etcetera etcetera LOL
 
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33
Location
44'N/88.5'W
Weeping and gnashing of teeth from the greybeard "Thicker is better" crowd. This isn't the "good ole days"(which never existed...kinda like "free beer tomorrow" )...and engines have (wait for it) EVOLVED. Yes. I know it's difficult to process using the 286 up there...but yes. With tighter tolerances, oil pressure dependent ancillary systems such as VVT and DI...the world NEEDS different spec'd lubricant. Remember when the world was ending back when 5/30 was introduced? Just use what the people who know a LOT more about their engines than anyone here recommends. They don't just arbitrarily slap a number on that filler cap. They test those engines in every imaginable scenario well past what you or anyone else with any common sense will put their SUV or truck through.
 
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14,017
Location
...
Originally Posted by HiPowerShooter
Weeping and gnashing of teeth from the greybeard "Thicker is better" crowd. This isn't the "good ole days"(which never existed...kinda like "free beer tomorrow" )...and engines have (wait for it) EVOLVED. Yes. I know it's difficult to process using the 286 up there...but yes. With tighter tolerances, oil pressure dependent ancillary systems such as VVT and DI...the world NEEDS different spec'd lubricant. Remember when the world was ending back when 5/30 was introduced? Just use what the people who know a LOT more about their engines than anyone here recommends. They don't just arbitrarily slap a number on that filler cap. They test those engines in every imaginable scenario well past what you or anyone else with any common sense will put their SUV or truck through.
I'm a graybeard as you call us seniors and I use whatever oil the manufacturer recommends. The engines of today are not like the old engines of yesterday. In fact they are much much better. I started with 30 grade in metal cans and a spout and today I run 0w20. Times change and usually for the better.
 
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14,722
Location
Illinois
Originally Posted by jayg
Originally Posted by CharlieBauer
0w16 is the new water. Long live 0w20!
2006: 0w20 is the new water long live 5w30 1986: 5w30 is like water long live ..... etcetera etcetera LOL
But in the late 70's I used M1 5-20 in my engine calling for 10-40. Worked very well for 100K OCI.
 
Messages
1,306
Location
Rabbit Creek, Alaska
Originally Posted by tig1
Originally Posted by jayg
Originally Posted by CharlieBauer
0w16 is the new water. Long live 0w20!
2006: 0w20 is the new water long live 5w30 1986: 5w30 is like water long live ..... etcetera etcetera LOL
But in the late 70's I used M1 5-20 in my engine calling for 10-40. Worked very well for 100K OCI.
I know. We all know. You've posted that exact post how many times for how many years?
 
Messages
14,722
Location
Illinois
Originally Posted by jayg
Originally Posted by tig1
Originally Posted by jayg
Originally Posted by CharlieBauer
0w16 is the new water. Long live 0w20!
2006: 0w20 is the new water long live 5w30 1986: 5w30 is like water long live ..... etcetera etcetera LOL
But in the late 70's I used M1 5-20 in my engine calling for 10-40. Worked very well for 100K OCI.
I know. We all know. You've posted that exact post how many times for how many years?
My bad. Meant to say 10K OCI not 100K OCI. TYPO.
 
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14,739
Location
Upper Midwest
Originally Posted by jayg
Originally Posted by tig1
But in the late 70's I used M1 5-20 in my engine calling for 10-40. Worked very well for 100K OCI.
I know. We all know. You've posted that exact post how many times for how many years?
And he also knows that the grade designation vs. the HTHS was different then.
 
Messages
21,889
Location
Dallas,Tx USA
Originally Posted by Ifixyawata
Originally Posted by painfx
No point going any lower than what manufacturers calls for.
Nor is there any point in going higher.
It depends what you're after. Multi-vis fsms state to use thinner oils for fuel economy and state to use thicker oils for extended high speeds,racing,towing,hot climates,etc. It's all a give and take.
 
Messages
14,722
Location
Illinois
Originally Posted by kschachn
Originally Posted by jayg
Originally Posted by tig1
But in the late 70's I used M1 5-20 in my engine calling for 10-40. Worked very well for 100K OCI.
I know. We all know. You've posted that exact post how many times for how many years?
And he also knows that the grade designation vs. the HTHS was different then.
But not by much compared to the 10-40 Valvoline I was using, and you should have known that. Really you should have. thankyou
 
Messages
1,130
Location
California
So we have: "The engineers who designed the vehicle know best... use the oil recommended by the manufacturer" and "Manufacturers must meet cafe standards which means running the thinnest oil that will allow the engine to survive the warranty period." This seems to be confirmed by manufacturers now recommending thinner oils in the exact same engine. My Tacoma 2.7 is just one good example: from 2003-2009 the oil spec for this motor was 5w30 but beginning in 2010 the spec changed to 0w/5w20. This engine had with VVT-i (intake only) from the start, and began dual VVT-i in 2015 so that had no bearing on the change in 2010. So are these statements in disagreement? What is the truth? This question has been asked before I am sure, maybe someone can provide a link. Thanks
 
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1,411
Location
Western Canada
Originally Posted by Ifixyawata
Originally Posted by painfx
No point going any lower than what manufacturers calls for.
Nor is there any point in going higher.
Oil viscosity is heat dependent. Manage oil temperatures effectively, and a thinner grade oil works fine. Let oil temperatures get too hot, and a thicker oil will be needed. 0w16 oil is about 7.2 cSt at 100*c., and 8.7 cSt at 90*C. And, for example, M1 5w20 is about 8.9 cSt at 100*C. But at 90*C, it is about 11.0 cSt. However, at 110*C, viscosity drops to about 7.3 cSt., and at 120*C viscosity is getting low at 6.1 cSt. M1 5w30 at 100*C is about 11.0 cSt, the same as the 5w20 is at 90*c. At 110*C viscosity falls to 9.0 cSt. And, M1 5W40 FM is at about 8.9 cSt at 120*C, the same as the 5w20 is at 100*C. So, one can see that all the viscosity grades overlap, depending on temperature. A 16 grade at 90*C is about the same as a 20 grade at 100*C, which is about the same as a 30 grade at 110*C, or a 40 grade at 120*C
 
Messages
422
Location
California
Agreed Panos. Great post by geeman789. This illustrates what Toyota/Lexus is doing with my vehicle in specing 0W16. The engine temperature is regulated by, for example, an electronically controlled thermostat. My Lexus UX 250h F-Sport gets up to operating temperature real fast, and does not get too hot at all. Also let me add this. I happened to purchase a PriusC the very day Ravenol came to market in North America with EFE 0W16. My vehicle , although spec'd for 0W20, was a prime candidate for using this oil. I quickly gravitated towards Ravenol EFE 0W16. There were several OCI's consisting of 10-12k mile intervals. I found this oil to be stellar, although I do not have any data. It is very expensive but if extended OCI's are appropriate, it might just be worth it. Shannow, who knows a thing or two about lubrication, has said that he would prefer this oil to Japanese style 0w20 oils. The Japanese style thin oils, such as Idemitsu, High Moly Mazda, TGMO, and Eneos, go for high viscosity index, and often have lots of organic moly, in addition to the high dose VII's. The Ravenol uses 2x Mobil1 dosage of tri nuclear moly, as well as other organic friction modifiers. VII's are minimal. Ravenol base stocks are PAO+ Group V vs Group III for the typical Japanese style 0W16 oils. Ravenol even states that their oil is suitable for applications where 0W20 and 5w20 oils are spec'd. The EFE 0W16 tests quite favorably vs 5W30 oils, too. Warning however. As stated, GF-6B oils will not be backward compatible. Thickies will still have their day.
 
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