Royal enfield interceptor 650 oil choice

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Earth
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I have a 2020 Royal enfield interceptor 650, and interested in some options on oil. I've owned a good number of bikes, mostly high dollar sport bike stuff. This enfield has the nicest shifting transmission I've ever felt, up until I reach 300-500 miles, and it starts to feel not as good. Especially if you're going from 2-3 gear, and back down to 1 in the city. Sometimes it doesn't wanna go back to first. That's most likely from it being 90 degrees out, an air cooled motor and going stop lights to stop light ? Changed the oil and did the valves at 500 miles, used maxima 10w-50 pro plus+ (Had it on my shelf). The shifting went downhill around 500 miles, and changed to motul 10w-50 4t semi synthetic (had it on my shelf) The shifting feel lasted 300 miles on that oil, but ran it 1,800 miles and changed it out for the same thing as I had more on hand. The bike does call for a full synthetic and 6,000 mile intervals. I couldn't imagine how it would shift at 6k without an oil change. It's currently summer in my region, so 75-90+ degrees and the occasional few random 55-60ish degree mornings. Considering just going with Mobil 1 v twin 20w-50 but afraid that might be too thick? These bikes have a 3 year unlimited mileage warranty. I would hate to mess that up by switching viscosities. . . Any recommendations for a better quality oil?
 
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4,275
Location
OK
It's hard to believe your bike's engine is so unique that it kills shift quality in 300 miles, especially when you ran Maxima and Motul which are both solid MC oils. You could try Maxima Extra 15W50 which is expensive but claims to have a formulation that preserves viscosity. But a 20W50 would also work fine in your case. Mobil1 Vtwin 20W50 is a very hefty oil.
 
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134
Location
GB
My motorcycle oil of choice, after researching lots of data sheets, is Penrite. They seem to be the only Oil manufacturer that sells a genuine group V synthetic motorcycle oil. Being an Australian company, they have a grasp of high temperature issues. I use the relevant grades in all my bikes, and I do have a Royal Enfield Pegasus, which is basically a Classic 500 with military livery. Your shiftng issue may be unrelated to lubrication, I would talk to your dealer about it.
 
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638
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Colorado, USA
I think most oil manufacturers have a grasp on high temperature issues, LOL. Check to be sure the clutch is fully disengaging when you shift. You would notice that more on downshifts than up shifts, IMO. But the fact it happens after 300 to 500 miles on the OCI is interesting and before that it's the smoothest transmission you've ever used. I don't know Royal Enfield production tolerances however maybe there's something there that things are really tight and as the oil shears down it becomes harder to shift. For what it's worth, my 1980 Yamaha XS1100 would chew through in 2000-2500 miles. A hot running air-cooled engine even today has to run loser tolerances in the engine to account for expansion and contraction. Which leads to increased blow-by, which is absolutely acceptable in and of itself by design, and oil contamination and oil stress from the heat. I assume it's a cable actuated clutch. Check the free play at the lever and if it needs adjusting that might be worth looking at. May have to adjust it at the engine instead/as well. 20w50 Mobil 1 V-Twin is my oil of choice if I was to recommend one in this situation, however I think you're dealing with something mechanical and hopefully a simple adjustment. Try some Mobil 1 20w50 V Twin or even Redline 20w50, those are very stout oils and they resist shear as well as anything available. If it doesn't improve take it to the dealer and question if something else is going on.
 
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134
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GB
Originally Posted by Bonz
I think most oil manufacturers have a grasp on high temperature issues, LOL!
I wouldn't be so sure of that! Not all oils are equal! Even of the same spec!
 
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Earth
Thread starter
Originally Posted by Bonz
I think most oil manufacturers have a grasp on high temperature issues, LOL. Check to be sure the clutch is fully disengaging when you shift. You would notice that more on downshifts than up shifts, IMO. But the fact it happens after 300 to 500 miles on the OCI is interesting and before that it's the smoothest transmission you've ever used. I don't know Royal Enfield production tolerances however maybe there's something there that things are really tight and as the oil shears down it becomes harder to shift. For what it's worth, my 1980 Yamaha XS1100 would chew through in 2000-2500 miles. A hot running air-cooled engine even today has to run loser tolerances in the engine to account for expansion and contraction. Which leads to increased blow-by, which is absolutely acceptable in and of itself by design, and oil contamination and oil stress from the heat. I assume it's a cable actuated clutch. Check the free play at the lever and if it needs adjusting that might be worth looking at. May have to adjust it at the engine instead/as well. 20w50 Mobil 1 V-Twin is my oil of choice if I was to recommend one in this situation, however I think you're dealing with something mechanical and hopefully a simple adjustment. Try some Mobil 1 20w50 V Twin or even Redline 20w50, those are very stout oils and they resist shear as well as anything available. If it doesn't improve take it to the dealer and question if something else is going on.
cable Clutch was the first the first thing I checked. It's not that. It's back to extra smooth shifts when you change the oil, then degrades within a few hundred miles.
 
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268
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New York
Originally Posted by Abax25
It calls for 10w-50.
The first number (the W rating) is a measure of an oil's pumpability at subzero temperatures. So it's irrelevant at the temperatures you mentioned.
 
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638
Location
Colorado, USA
OP, thanks for clarifying you have already checked the clutch. Oh my, do not go to a 5w40. That weight will shear down as quick as anything you've used with any brand you choose. Fact. Yes, most manufacturers have a grasp on high temperature issues. The difference in conventional vs synthetic is there no matter who the manufacturer is. You can expect conventional or synthetic with similar base oil compositions and additive packages to all pretty much perform the same. Using a group V or whatever as a base doesn't make a manufacturer have a better grasp on high temperature issues. It means the oil potentially does better at high temperature and the manufacturer has chosen that as their probably fairly high-priced niche market. Any manufacturer could choose the same thing as the next guy. There is no silver bullet that one manufacturer has up the spout that no one else can't do if they choose. Back to what I was saying, Mobil 1 20w50 V Twin is worth a shot to see if the shifting goes in the dump or if it holds on longer. Redline 20w50 motorcycle oil would be right there at the top of my list as well. That oil is as stout as it gets based on every analysis I have ever seen just like the Mobil 20w50 V Twin.
 
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134
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GB
Which ever you choose, make sure it's a motorcycle specific lubricant because it needs to be compatible with wet clutches.
 
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638
Location
Colorado, USA
Yeah that 60 weight on the upper end ought to teach that engine and transmission to behave, LOL. With that said Royal Enfield specs a 50 weight on the top end, and said you don't ride below 55-60 degrees F other than in the morning this time of year. 20w50 is what I I would go with. If the situation doesn't start getting better go to your dealer. Or, LOL, try to whip it into shape with that Redline 20w 60... What do guys on the Royal Enfield forum say? Have you checked with other people that have the Continental or the Interceptor which share that engine and tranny?
 
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105
Location
VA
Maybe the bike is still getting broken in, according to Amsoil they recommend their 15w50 for it. I have a Ninja 650 and started out with the Kawasaki conventional oil to break it in then switched to Castrol Actevo 10w40 which is a blend and can be had for a good price at Walmart. I know mine has issues occasionally where you have to stop fast and come to a complete stop that it gets hung up in the gears and you can't shift it up or down so you are stuck trying to get it back into gear, I have found that it's a common problem on this model but hoping it will get better as it gets broken in but next time I'm going with full synthetic most likely Valvoline or Castrol but I have some other choices to choose from as well. I wouldn't have any problems running a 15w50 if anything in theory it should be more resistant to shearing. I've found Castrol also makes a full synthetic in 10w50, also there's Yamalube 15w50 full synthetic if you have a dealer close to you that's convenient. The Mobil 1 V Twin oil is made for air cooled bikes so you could run that as well, it would just be a little more thick at startup but at operating temperature it's still a 50w oil.
 
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24,196
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PNW
Originally Posted by Abax25
Originally Posted by CT8
Why would the M1 be too thick?
It calls for 10w-50.
Is that the only viscosity recommended in the owner's manual?
 

CCI

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249
Location
New Mexico USA
I will probably take some heat from the purists and the folks who actually do know what they are talking about when it comes to oil, but I'm going to tell you what works for me. Shovelheads are notorious for beating up oil, the high performance ones even more so. The saving grace is they leak enough to keep fresh oil in them all the time. 20w-50 does not hold up at freeway speeds in hot weather, it tuns way too thin, and it runs out of every hole in the motor. If the oil is thick enough to hold up it's tough to kick the bike on a cold morning. So depending upon the time of year I run a mixture of 20w-50 and straight 60, wintertime more 20w-50, summertime more 60. Both oils rated for motorcycles of course. It is amazing how well this works.
 
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