Considering buying a Franz Filter

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Hi Everyone, I am considering in the near future buying a Franz filter for my Dodge Grand Caravan. It looks like the full kit is a little under $300. I have watched a few videos, and the install looks fairly simple. It appears the kit comes with a fitting to "t" off of the oil sending unit or something like that (correct me if I am wrong). I plan to drill a hole in the oil filler cap and running the return line there instead of puncturing the oil pan. My plan is to make minimal modifications to the van so I can return the van to stock easily and move the filter to the next vehicle. Are there other tp filter brands to consider? Any other suggestions or tips? Thanks for your time, Brad
 
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Originally Posted By: DeafBrad
Any other suggestions or tips? Thanks for your time,
1) Use a good quality synthetic oil, change every 10K (typically, YMMV) 2) Use a good glass media oil filter Following this formula, the rest of your van will likely fall apart before the engine dies.
 
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That's what I would do and have done on my trucks. As far as brands of Tp are concerned Scott 1000, BoardWalk, and Kirkland brands work well. You might want to consider getting a sleeve or orings to seal the center roll to the Frantz tube. If you look on Ebay NOS units come up from time to time, so you don't need to pay 300 for one.
 
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Originally Posted By: JC1
What year is the caravan?
It is a 2006 Dodge Caravan. I "get it" why these are popular, as they are nice. I have 153k miles or so on it now.
 
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1) Use a good quality synthetic oil, change every 10K (typically, YMMV) 2) Use a good glass media oil filter Thanks for the info. Do you change out the tp early or do you leave it in 10k miles? I have a microgreen filter on the van now, and most likely will just leave it on.
 
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Originally Posted By: A310
That's what I would do and have done on my trucks. As far as brands of Tp are concerned Scott 1000, BoardWalk, and Kirkland brands work well. You might want to consider getting a sleeve or orings to seal the center roll to the Frantz tube. If you look on Ebay NOS units come up from time to time, so you don't need to pay 300 for one.
Thanks for the info. So my understanding is the oil comes up the center tube and drains through the tp and out the bottom, right? I am assuming the tp must be tight on the center roll, and on the outside of the roll up against the canister as well.
 
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Originally Posted By: CT8
Bypass filter because?
Because I want to. Think of it as a hobby, and something to do. As well, it would be a big plus for the engine to not to wear and use oil as the miles pile on. I tend to keep my vehicles a while.
 
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Originally Posted By: DeafBrad
Originally Posted By: A310
That's what I would do and have done on my trucks. As far as brands of Tp are concerned Scott 1000, BoardWalk, and Kirkland brands work well. You might want to consider getting a sleeve or orings to seal the center roll to the Frantz tube. If you look on Ebay NOS units come up from time to time, so you don't need to pay 300 for one.
Thanks for the info. So my understanding is the oil comes up the center tube and drains through the tp and out the bottom, right? I am assuming the tp must be tight on the center roll, and on the outside of the roll up against the canister as well.
That's correct.:)
 
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Originally Posted By: Linctex
I can see this as a hobby.... just please don't expect any stellar results, OK?
What expectation are you finding people have with the bypass filter? I don't think my expectations are too high... I would say my expectation would be #1 to extend the oil change intervals to 10k miles (the manual calls for 3k mile oil changes in severe duty) and #2 extend the amount of life the engine has as a non-oil burner. I currently am using a Microgreen filter, and I believe the Franz is a step or 2 above the Microgreen.
 
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I installed one on my car. Mostly as a conversation piece and a laugh. I T'd the pressure feed from the oil pressure sender (which broke off in the block on removal, whee!) and drilled a hole in the oil pan for the return line. I made sure to install a restriction prior to the inlet of the filter. I've had my car running on toilet paper for 60,000km now (out of 320,000), no signs of issues. I did an oil analysis on my last oil change without the Frantz, and my first oil change upon using the TP filter, and the results were surprisingly good. I use some generic single ply from Rona (hardware store) - I think it's rebranded Scott 1000, but we can't get Scott 1000 here.
 
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Originally Posted By: DeafBrad
I don't think my expectations are too high... I would say my expectation would be #1 to extend the oil change intervals to 10k miles
Just about any oil can get you to 10K in Washington's climate. You'll have to do the math... $300+ is like 30 oil changes, every 5,000 miles is another 150,000 miles without the installation of the bypass. A bypass filter helps get out PARTICULATE. Only. It does not improve TBN, or help with shearing, etc. I said "don't expect stellar results", because you can get your 2006 Caravan engine to 300,000 miles with just good maintenance. But I worry about the rest of the van....
 
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I never change my oil on engines I have Frantz filters installed on. I've been using them for the last 50 years so I've saved a lot of cash. One thing you may want to to consider concerning the oil return line is that it's better for it to drain downhill from the bypass filter. That way it's a lot less messy when you open up the Frantz IF you allow it to drain out the excess oil overnight.
 
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Originally Posted By: jacobs
I never change my oil on engines I have Frantz filters installed on. I've been using them for the last 50 years so I've saved a lot of cash. One thing you may want to to consider concerning the oil return line is that it's better for it to drain downhill from the bypass filter. That way it's a lot less messy when you open up the Frantz IF you allow it to drain out the excess oil overnight.
Thanks for your reply. smile The reason I wanted to return the oil in the oil cap is so I can remove the filter with little fuss and return it to stock when I sell the vehicle. My plan is to move the Franz to each new vehicle as I replace the vehicle. Several questions for you: 1. For the filter change... if the Franz is mounted high, will the oil drain out the intake line if parked for a few hours? 2. Is puncturing the oil pan the best way to return the oil downhill? Any other suggestions? 3. Any results to post regarding using Franz in your cars for the last 50 years? (subjective opinions are fine.) smile
 
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1. Any drainback in the oil pressure line would be very minimal. 2. Some dislike puncturing the oil pan for the return line but I prefer returning the oil directly to the oil pan. I've never seen a problem arise from this practice. Options include using a hollow bolt. When Frantz was owned by SKY, hollow bolts were commonly available through SKY. On many engines you could remove an intake manifold bolt, replace it with the appropriate size hollow bolt and then attach your return line to the hollow bolt. I've even welded steel fittings on some of my oil pans. 3. Other than saving a lot of money on oil changes and keeping the oil and crankcase clean 100% of the time, I once had a catastrophic failure where I lost all my rod and main bearings on a 2000 Subaru due to loss of oil pressure caused by a combination of the bolts retaining the plate on the rear of oil pump and my use of a sandwich adapter. Take either factor out of the equation and I'm sure the failure wouldn't have happened. Needless to say I'll never use or recommend the use of a sandwich adapter again plus using a sandwich adapter, the oil will not drain out of the Frantz back to the pan making filter changes very messy.
 
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Originally Posted By: jacobs
1. Any drainback in the oil pressure line would be very minimal. 2. Some dislike puncturing the oil pan for the return line but I prefer returning the oil directly to the oil pan. I've never seen a problem arise from this practice. Options include using a hollow bolt. When Frantz was owned by SKY, hollow bolts were commonly available through SKY. On many engines you could remove an intake manifold bolt, replace it with the appropriate size hollow bolt and then attach your return line to the hollow bolt. I've even welded steel fittings on some of my oil pans. 3. Other than saving a lot of money on oil changes and keeping the oil and crankcase clean 100% of the time, I once had a catastrophic failure where I lost all my rod and main bearings on a 2000 Subaru due to loss of oil pressure caused by a combination of the bolts retaining the plate on the rear of oil pump and my use of a sandwich adapter. Take either factor out of the equation and I'm sure the failure wouldn't have happened. Needless to say I'll never use or recommend the use of a sandwich adapter again plus using a sandwich adapter, the oil will not drain out of the Frantz back to the pan making filter changes very messy.
Thanks for responding. I read about your problem with your Subaru in one of your threads. That is a bummer. Now to get a unit purchased! smile
 
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The reason I said "don't have high expectations" : https://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php/topics/3658829/all/Bypass_wizards_check_in,_Cat_1 Yes, a bypass filter will help keep oil cleaner - THAT IS TRUE The facts: having a bypass filter doesn't mean the engine will last forever. Period.
 
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