Should I stick with premium fuel ? GM LTG 2.0 Turbo

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445
Location
Western usa
I’ve been purchasing premium gasoline for our Buick regal for the past five years. The engine is the somewhat infamous LTG 2.0 turbo from GM. This particular engine has a reputation for grenading due to preignition issues. How risky would it be to switch to regular unleaded?. Any LTG owners out there running regular? Thanks 😊
 
Messages
12,890
Location
ROCHESTER, NY
Not an owner however, does your owner's manual "REQUIRE" premium fuel?
If so, you should stay with premium fuel. On the other hand, if not then use whichever grade you like.

There is a difference(which you may/may not know) between "REQUIRED" & "RECOMMEND".

Also, the grenading that you mention is typically caused by too many wide open throttle(WOT) applications to RED LINE(in any engine). Some engines can take it better than others. Could also be poor design but, I've heard good things about this engine. :)

Proper lubrication or a slightly higher grade of oil(more robust) may be necessary for this engine or aggressive WOT. It can't just be about gasoline. Seems as though improper lubrication could be the cause of the grenading of others LTG 2.0L Turbo engine.

Proper lubrication for the driving style is key as well as proper fuel for that style. Be it if you only drive like you stole the vehicle or like grandpa. Use what is appropriate.
 
Messages
2,898
Location
Chicagoland
I’m assuming it’s a 2015 since you said 5 years... owners manual I found online states 91 for the 2.0 turbo. You *can* use 87 but states “Regular unleaded gasoline rated at 87 octane or higher can be used, but acceleration and fuel economy WILL be reduced, and an audible knocking noise may be heard. If this occurs, use a gasoline rated at 91 octane or higher as soon as possible.” Emphasis mine.

The few bucks saved by using 87 isn’t worth the potential engine damage IMO.
 
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6,452
Location
In the Garage...
I have a 2.0 LTG turbo in my 2015 Malibu. You are talking about LSPI, which was more of problem in earlier ones. Happens at low speeds during acceleration due to, in the case of the LTG, droplets of oil in combustion chamber. The LTG is actually a really good little engine.
Think about how many platforms use it. Camaro, Impala, Malibu, Equinox, Regal, CTS, Camaro, Traverse, Terrain, ATS and I am forgetting some.
The problem isn't all that wide spread. There are millions out there. Like anything you hear about the ones that fail.
Having said all that.
Change your oil more frequently. I do the Malibu every 4000 miles. Change your oil more often, run premium and change your plugs at 65,000 miles like they tell you to.

Don't cheap out. How much are saving over a year running regular unleaded?
 
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Messages
566
Location
Massachusetts
If it’s not required I’d give it a try.

I once ran an expensive car for two years on regular and it was required to run super. I lost a little acceleration, but my fuel economy didn’t drop at all. And I did lose some of the smoothness upon acceleration as well. I didn’t notice any misfires but I suppose my knock sensors were working overtime, but for me it was worth it - I was driving 500-700 miles per week and it was a V8 direct injected Lexus. I probably saved $80 bucks a month or so. My commute was mostly highway and I never pushed this car (performance wise) anyway.
 
Messages
24,167
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
I’ve been purchasing premium gasoline for our Buick regal for the past five years. The engine is the somewhat infamous LTG 2.0 turbo from GM. This particular engine has a reputation for grenading due to preignition issues. How risky would it be to switch to regular unleaded?. Any LTG owners out there running regular? Thanks 😊
Save a couple of bucks and possibly blow the engine, not a good plan. DO NOT run low octane in most forced induction engines especially one like this with almost 20 pounds of boost, the damage that could occur will be instantaneous and extreme.
This is a good engine with a lot of trick parts, most of the issues are operator/owner negligence.
 
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