Pennzoil recommends Platinum Euro LX 0w30 for Jetta 1.4 TSI?

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I was playing around with the oil selector tool on the Pennzoil website for my 2016 Jetta 1.4 TSI and I noticed they are recommending the Euro LX 0w30 ACEA C2/C3 formulation. Isn't this a "low SAPS" diesel type oil? (yes I realize it can be used in gasoline engines) I guess I just thought this was a VW 507 oil for fuel types in Europe or US diesel only primarily. Does Pennzoil not realize that this engine is not a diesel? I was nearly certain I would get a 5w40 or 0w40 A3/B4 oil so when it spit this out I was quite surprised. Also, I have owned several VW and Audi products and always used the Castrol Edge 5w40 oil like it says on the cap (dealer oil changes mostly) -- I have been doing some of my own oil changes again recently and really been wanting to try a Pennzoil product. The thing is, I'm looking at viscosity numbers and noack volatility and spec sheets and I'm coming away pretty impressed with Castrol. Anyone have any thoughts?
 
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Mobiloil.com says: "your vehicle manufacturer recommends a 5W-30 or 5W-40 viscosity and oil that meets VW 502 00, VW 503 00 or VW 504 00. A 0W-30 or 0W-40 viscosity can also be used. Your engine oil capacity is approximately 4.2 quarts." They are generally reliable in recommendations. Your owners manual should describe it well too. Bottom line: VW 504 oil is the EuroLX 0w30 stuff, and low-saps is fine with the 2019+ low sulfur gasoline in the U.S. now. EPA did that. Acids don't build up as fast with less sulfur and low starting TBN. No problem with VW 504 low saps.
 
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As has been noted above, the oil has VW 504 00 approval which is one of the ones required for your vehicle. The correct approval is important, within the confines of that the grade is largely irrelevant.
 
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low-saps is fine with the 2019+ low sulfur gasoline in the U.S. now. EPA did that. Acids don't build up as fast with less sulfur and low starting TBN.
Ahh! I did not realize we had the new fuel in the US. Okay this makes sense to me now. Thanks!
 
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I was using Pennzoil 0W-40 and 5W-40 in my Jetta. It gave me the warm fuzzy feeling too. Then that stupid Valvoline sale hit and I bought 15 jugs... Pennzoil 5W40 looked gold even after 5-6K.
 
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While it's a great oil, you have much easier to find (and cheaper) options for your Jetta. But if you'd like to see what the oil looks like with use in a gas engine, I should have UOA results in the next day or two.
 
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Originally Posted by RamFan
While it's a great oil, you have much easier to find (and cheaper) options for your Jetta. But if you'd like to see what the oil looks like with use in a gas engine, I should have UOA results in the next day or two.
Used in a different engine produced by a different manufacturer operated under different conditions? How is that relevant?
 
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Originally Posted by RamFan
While it's a great oil, you have much easier to find (and cheaper) options for your Jetta. But if you'd like to see what the oil looks like with use in a gas engine, I should have UOA results in the next day or two.
I am always interested in UOAs on these euro oils. Definitely! Thanks!
 
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I've seen a few people state the US now has lower sulfur gasoline starting 2019. Unless I missed something, the US has the same standards since 2017. Average annual sulfur by refiner is 10ppm. An individual batch can leave the refinery at 80ppm and be 95ppm further downstream. So yeah, you are very very likely to get 10ppm or lower, but, there is the chance of getting up to 95ppm.
 
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Originally Posted by GJM120
I've seen a few people state the US now has lower sulfur gasoline starting 2019. Unless I missed something, the US has the same standards since 2017. Average annual sulfur by refiner is 10ppm. An individual batch can leave the refinery at 80ppm and be 95ppm further downstream. So yeah, you are very very likely to get 10ppm or lower, but, there is the chance of getting up to 95ppm.
Same here. I tried googling the EPA gasoline change and the only one I saw was the one enacted in 2017 (EPA Tier 3?)
 
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Originally Posted by trgfunds
Originally Posted by GJM120
I've seen a few people state the US now has lower sulfur gasoline starting 2019. Unless I missed something, the US has the same standards since 2017. Average annual sulfur by refiner is 10ppm. An individual batch can leave the refinery at 80ppm and be 95ppm further downstream. So yeah, you are very very likely to get 10ppm or lower, but, there is the chance of getting up to 95ppm.
Same here. I tried googling the EPA gasoline change and the only one I saw was the one enacted in 2017 (EPA Tier 3?)
True, 2017. However, the EPA was granting temporary waivers to smaller refineries only if they could show financial hardship (capital equipment forced purchases, down-time, etc.) caused by the new limits. That was temporary and now that its late 2019, those are just about all expired, so, its now considered "likely" and "safe" for low sulfur 10 ppm gasoline, finally, right?
 
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I currently have Euro LX 0w-30 in my Subaru Forester XT (FA20DIT) for the cold Canadian winter. It's running pretty smooth so far. Will do a UOA when done. BTW, Canadian Tire has this oil on sale this week, 26$ for a 5 liters + 10$ MIR.
 
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Originally Posted by kschachn
Originally Posted by RamFan
While it's a great oil, you have much easier to find (and cheaper) options for your Jetta. But if you'd like to see what the oil looks like with use in a gas engine, I should have UOA results in the next day or two.
Used in a different engine produced by a different manufacturer operated under different conditions? How is that relevant?
Right, because UOAs are only useful if compared to the same engine, produced by the same manufacturer and operated under similar conditions. smirk2 coffee
 
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Originally Posted by RamFan
Right, because UOAs are only useful if compared to the same engine, produced by the same manufacturer and operated under similar conditions. smirk2 coffee
That's correct, do you have evidence to the contrary? All UOA from a properly rated oil are dependent on engine design and operating conditions, not the specific lubricant being used.
 
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Originally Posted by paoester
Anybody know why Euro LX has a lot of Boron? Its around 400 ppm.
LSPI fighter. Boron is thought to combat LSPI while moly is believed to actually contribute to it. The Euro LX is a very fine oil, it meets VW 504 which is an incredibly tough spec and I think your 1.4 is supposed to have 504 anyway. Of is it so new it takes VW 508?
 
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Originally Posted by KCJeep
Originally Posted by paoester
Anybody know why Euro LX has a lot of Boron? Its around 400 ppm.
LSPI fighter. Boron is thought to combat LSPI while moly is believed to actually contribute to it. The Euro LX is a very fine oil, it meets VW 504 which is an incredibly tough spec and I think your 1.4 is supposed to have 504 anyway. Of is it so new it takes VW 508?
Your information source? Infineum in the past said that moly & zddp quench LSPI. https://www.jstor.org/stable/26284862 There was an Infineum patent that mentioned some boron with the moly to quench LSPI though, were you looking at that one? http://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2019/0093041.html Problem is, Euro LX does not have moly, only boron.
 
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Originally Posted by KCJeep
Originally Posted by paoester
Anybody know why Euro LX has a lot of Boron? Its around 400 ppm.
LSPI fighter. Boron is thought to combat LSPI while moly is believed to actually contribute to it. The Euro LX is a very fine oil, it meets VW 504 which is an incredibly tough spec and I think your 1.4 is supposed to have 504 anyway. Of is it so new it takes VW 508?
The sticker under my hood says use VW 502 oil. The thing about all these specs during the 2015 to 2017 timeframe (mine is a 2016 model year built in late 2015) is that this was before and during the time that the USA was still in limbo regarding low sulpher gasoline, so I would guess that any and all of these VWs (and other manufacturers respective standards) can be run on 502/5, 504/7, or 508/xx -- After all, aren't the engines and catalytic converters exactly the same? Not sure I would venture to try a 508 oil but I am eventually gonna try a 504 lower SAPS 0w30 (such as Pennzoil Euro LX or Mobil 1 ESP) and see if I get better mileage over the dealer's Castrol Edge 5w40 502 spec stuff.
 
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