Fuel Tanker Driver Here

Messages
71
Location
NM, USA
Quote
It's 0.001% or 100ppm in most cases. So for 1000 gallons of E10 about 1 gallon is the additive package.
0.001% of (1000 US gallons) = 0.01 US gallons 0.01 US gallons = 37.85412 cc = 20.975443117 us fluid oz one of those per 1000 gallons / [Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]
 
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Messages
664
Location
New Jersey
Originally Posted by StarCaller
Quote
It's 0.001% or 100ppm in most cases. So for 1000 gallons of E10 about 1 gallon is the additive package.
0.001% of (1000 US gallons) = 0.01 US gallons 0.01 US gallons = 37.85412 cc = 20.975443117 us fluid oz one of those per 1000 gallons / [Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]
Wonder if that is enough to be Top Tier...
 

4WD

Messages
13,126
Location
Texas
What are your thoughts on the proposal for the USA to adopt a single gasoline (likely 91 octane) and diesel only. (One gas and one diesel at the pumps) Are there enough potential cost savings in the fuel world to help balance what some engine designers hope for ?
 
Messages
271
Location
Northeast Georgia
Thread starter
Originally Posted by StarCaller
Quote
It's 0.001% or 100ppm in most cases. So for 1000 gallons of E10 about 1 gallon is the additive package.
0.001% of (1000 US gallons) = 0.01 US gallons 0.01 US gallons = 37.85412 cc = 20.975443117 us fluid oz one of those per 1000 gallons / [Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]
My mistake, I had too many zeros and/or the decimal in the wrong place. 100ppm is 0.01%. So 100ppm for 1000 gallons is 0.1 gallon...or 12.8 fl oz.
 
Messages
271
Location
Northeast Georgia
Thread starter
Originally Posted by nthach
Now, vapor recovery systems at a gas station. How do y'all deal with those? Granted, most states aren't as strict as California.
I'd say 95% of all stores now have vapor recovery. The only ones that don't are the ones in counties that are not part of clean air campaigns and were built before all the mandates. They are "grandfathered in" and we don't use the vapor hose for those. However, should any of those stores ever change ownership or have to replace the under ground tanks...a vapor recovery system would have to be installed. If "the man" were to ever catch a delivery driver dropping fuel at a station with a vapor system...and he's not using his required hookups, it's a $10,000 fine to the driver and $10,000 to the carrier he/she works for. No warnings issued in these infractions either.
 

Deo

Messages
14
Location
Atlanta, GA USA
Do you happen to know what brand additive Quiktrip gasoline receives? I'm curious about northwest metro Atlanta outside the perimeter (Kennesaw/Canton) if location matters.
 
Messages
271
Location
Northeast Georgia
Thread starter
Originally Posted by Deo
Do you happen to know what brand additive Quiktrip gasoline receives? I'm curious about northwest metro Atlanta outside the perimeter (Kennesaw/Canton) if location matters.
Not sure about QT. I don't haul their fuel. The gas you're buying in that area is coming out of Doraville. I'll ask one of the drivers I know who hauls for QT. I do know it's an unbranded product...
 
Messages
36
Location
Madison WI
Originally Posted by GoldDot40
Now....if I haul "Off Road"...aka dyed diesel in a compartment, I cannot load clear diesel behind it for the next load. I have to haul a load of gasoline in between to help "wash it out". You DO NOT want any dye residue to be found in somebody's clear diesel.
As long as I emptied the compartment I load whatever at the rack. The small amount of dyed fuel in the plumbing of the truck is not going to be relevant after loading 1,000 gallons of clear, or so it has not been an issue with me.
 
Messages
271
Location
Northeast Georgia
Thread starter
Originally Posted by kb9skw
Originally Posted by GoldDot40
Now....if I haul "Off Road"...aka dyed diesel in a compartment, I cannot load clear diesel behind it for the next load. I have to haul a load of gasoline in between to help "wash it out". You DO NOT want any dye residue to be found in somebody's clear diesel.
As long as I emptied the compartment I load whatever at the rack. The small amount of dyed fuel in the plumbing of the truck is not going to be relevant after loading 1,000 gallons of clear, or so it has not been an issue with me.
A driver got burned on this issue around here several years ago. State came out for a random product test and found "trace" amounts of dye in a clear diesel tank at a chain gas station. Fined the DRIVER $15,000 and the carrier $25,000. Word got around quick...nobody around here will even try it.
 
Messages
20
Location
Surf City, NJ
GoldDot40, Thanks very much for your candid sharing of information, it's nice to have some urban legends dispelled. I have a recently retired neighbor who worked for 40 years in the Phila refineries and all your info correlates with the knowledge I've gained from him. Drive safely, John
 
Messages
1,057
Location
WV
GoldDot if you are still around, did you see the post about Costco having the wrong gas which came up today? What say you on this alleged incident? Do you deliver to any Costcos?
 
Messages
271
Location
Northeast Georgia
Thread starter
Originally Posted by loneryder
GoldDot if you are still around, did you see the post about Costco having the wrong gas which came up today? What say you on this alleged incident? Do you deliver to any Costcos?
I think that's a preventable error either on the dispatcher or the driver...or both. We're all human and nobody is immune from mistakes. Most fuel haulers are pretty sharp...but there's some who are questionable. I don't and never have delivered to Costco. We don't have any in my delivery area. I have yet to see an E85 pump anywhere in my part of the state. That said, I've been dispatched the wrong brand and wrong product to stores on several occasions. Since I'm familiar with the stores and can log in to the inventory system with my phone browser...I usually catch these mistakes and simple loaded the correct product to avoid any drama. There's drivers out there who load and deliver exactly what they're dispatched without double checking. Of course...I let dispatch know when they screw up.
 
Messages
3
Location
GA
I got the answer where mixed fuel goes. Reading this thread was interesting. I had to register to reply, it's not often I know answer to questions, so I'm like a school boy with his hand in the air. But I do know where all the incorrectly mixed fuel goes to in Georgia. If you have ethenol, gas, Jet A or diesel that is mixed or incorrectly mixed it is commonally called "mixed fuel" and is sold at a discount. It goes to produce Electrical power at the Mid-Georgia Cogen. Mid-Georgia Cogen is a 308 MW electric combined cycle gas turbine power plant located in Kathleen, Georgia. The plant is primarily used meet peak power demands. There they have a large turbine engine powered generator. Since the engine is a turbine, it is designed to burning any type of liquid fuel. If mix fuel is not avalable they will just burn the most economical fuel, usually natural gas. The other source of mixed fuel, besides mistakes made on the fuel truck, is from when diesel and gas gets mixed in the colonal pipeline. Both fuels are pumped in the same pipeline. when they start pumping a new type of fuel, the fuel mixes with the fuel already in the pipe. This is the primary source of mix fuel.
 
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Messages
271
Location
Northeast Georgia
Thread starter
Originally Posted by JimGA
I got the answer where mixed fuel goes. Reading this thread was interesting. I had to register to reply, it's not often I know answer to questions, so I'm like a school boy with his hand in the air. But I do know where all the incorrectly mixed fuel goes to in Georgia. If you have ethenol, gas, Jet A or diesel that is mixed or incorrectly mixed it is commonally called "mixed fuel" and is sold at a discount. It goes to produce Electrical power at the Mid-Georgia Cogen. Mid-Georgia Cogen is a 308 MW electric combined cycle gas turbine power plant located in Kathleen, Georgia. The plant is primarily used meet peak power demands. There they have a large turbine engine powered generator. Since the engine is a turbine, it is designed to burning any type of liquid fuel. If mix fuel is not avalable they will just burn the most economical fuel, usually natural gas. The other source of mixed fuel, besides mistakes made on the fuel truck, is from when diesel and gas gets mixed in the colonal pipeline. Both fuels are pumped in the same pipeline. when they start pumping a new type of fuel, the fuel mixes with the fuel already in the pipe. This is the primary source of mix fuel.
Of course I don't/can't speak for all carriers, but our mixed product gets hauled to any 1 of 3 facilities where we offload it. One is in Birmingham AL, one is in Savannah GA, and one is somewhere in Virginia. None of them are guaranteed to accept it either. We have had trailers sit for months with mixed product on them with nowhere to take them. AND...when we do get one of those facilities to accept it, we have to pay them to take it. I don't know where it goes from those facilities. Could very well be power plants like the one you're talking about in Kathleen GA.
 
Messages
1
Location
Philadelphia PA
Hey GoldDot, thanks for this! Very informative. If your still around, I have a quick question that I was surprised that was not asked yet! 87 vs 93 Obviously more 87 is being delivered. But can you give us a rough idea what the percentage is between the two? 90% to 10%? 80/20? Also, I would think the 93 sits around a lot longer in the stores tanks. . . Can you give us an idea what the product "turn around" time is. Thanks again!!
 
Messages
271
Location
Northeast Georgia
Thread starter
Originally Posted by swss
Hey GoldDot, thanks for this! Very informative. If your still around, I have a quick question that I was surprised that was not asked yet! 87 vs 93 Obviously more 87 is being delivered. But can you give us a rough idea what the percentage is between the two? 90% to 10%? 80/20? Also, I would think the 93 sits around a lot longer in the stores tanks. . . Can you give us an idea what the product "turn around" time is. Thanks again!!
It will vary some depending on the region. For instance, stores close to large lakes/reservoirs, the 87 to 93 volume ratio is probably closer to 65/35 or even 60/40. Lots of people run 93 in their boats if ethanol free isn't available. Up in the mountains in my normal territory, it's closer to 90/10. Down around Augusta GA, I'd say 80/20. That's based on what's actually sold vs what we haul. I can see the flow rates of each product at the stores I deliver to, so my calculations are fairly accurate. Stores with 89 tanks in the ground? I wouldn't take a free fillup of that stuff.
 
Messages
664
Location
New Jersey
Originally Posted by GoldDot40
Originally Posted by swss
Hey GoldDot, thanks for this! Very informative. If your still around, I have a quick question that I was surprised that was not asked yet! 87 vs 93 Obviously more 87 is being delivered. But can you give us a rough idea what the percentage is between the two? 90% to 10%? 80/20? Also, I would think the 93 sits around a lot longer in the stores tanks. . . Can you give us an idea what the product "turn around" time is. Thanks again!!
It will vary some depending on the region. For instance, stores close to large lakes/reservoirs, the 87 to 93 volume ratio is probably closer to 65/35 or even 60/40. Lots of people run 93 in their boats if ethanol free isn't available. Up in the mountains in my normal territory, it's closer to 90/10. Down around Augusta GA, I'd say 80/20. That's based on what's actually sold vs what we haul. I can see the flow rates of each product at the stores I deliver to, so my calculations are fairly accurate. Stores with 89 tanks in the ground? I wouldn't take a free fillup of that stuff.
I thought 89 gets mixed at the gas pump nozzle. Didn't know it had it's own tank.
 
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