Annoying compressor oil requirements

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12,164
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Indiana
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[Linked Image] This is the oil requirement for my compressor. Since it's stored in a non climate controlled garage, it looks like technically I'll have to change the oil 3 times a year with the seasons to be by the book, but at the minimum at least 2 since it'd get colder than 40*F more often than warmer than 80*F. The manual says not to run it below 20*F. I won't make an effort to do so, but if a tire needs inflated when it's that cold, I'm going to use the dang thing. Just curious if there'd be any issues running an SAE 20 as that looks to be between the SAE 10 and 30. I'm surprised it isn't an option really.
 
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820
Location
Upper midwest
I have run regular car oil in my compressors for 30 years in Minnesota winters. Never had an issue using detergent oils. I will go out in the garage that is -10 and start up the compressor. I use Redline 0w-30. I use it because of the high moly and zinc and Ester for the cold start. It keeps a barrier there since the cold oil has a hard time flinging until it gets warmer. I could care less what the manual says. I change the oil every 3-4 years. My tank went out, before the pump did.
 
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6,748
Location
Lake Havasu City, Arizona
Compressors are not that oil critical. The biggest thing you don't want, is oil so thick it causes the motor to kick out in cold weather. Just use a 0W- Whatever, and you'll be good to go. They're not an automobile engine pulling a trailer up a mountain in the desert. They don't get that hot. Especially in a cold garage when they are cycling off and on all the time. Mine never gets hot enough to where I can't keep my hand the top of the cylinder head.
 
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9,986
Location
Waco, TX
Originally Posted by Mainia
I have run regular car oil in my compressors for 30 years in Minnesota winters. Never had an issue using detergent oils.
Same. For 99.9999% of consumers, they should just spec "any 10W-30 oil will do" already.........
 
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1,954
Location
North Carolina
To me the only time oil might come into play on how it effects the compressor is in an industrial setting where it is ran at 100% of it's duty cycle. Then just then it might make a difference. For us residential folks, not so much. To me just run a quality synthetic compressor fluid like AMSOIL's and press on. At work when I was in the Air Force we had a huge compressor that we used to get air from to start the Jet Fuel Starters, (JFS) that started the F-15E's. When it got down to 30 degrees or lower it didn't want to start. I changed it out to AMSOIL's PCIQT which is ISO 46, SAE 30 and it would crank and run even down to 20 degrees. Ran great even in the summer heat of 98 degree weather that we get here in eastern NC.
 
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1,857
Location
missouri
Compressors do not have filters so they do not want detergents, they want the dirt to settle out. The IR compressor is kind of a semi pro unit with a longer intended life than consumer grade but I believe it still uses reed valves. This is opposed to disc valves that run forever. Some will use it in their repair shop and it will run several hours a day. This compressor is supposed to last in that environment for 20-30 years with maybe a occasional reed valve replacement. Then you do need to adhere to the oil requirement in that use.. Home use is so much less hours that any oil changed once and a while will work. When we started our business we used a reed valve IR 2 stage. It ran with a 20 to 25% duty cycle for 5 years with no failure and was not heated in the winter, It is now the backup compressor. I think any decent quality cast iron compressor will run the rest of your life on any oil regardless in home use. If it is real cold you might start it with the tank vented and let it run for a few minutes to heat the oil before you let it build pressure. Rod
 
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3,651
Location
Worst Case, Ontario
Originally Posted by ragtoplvr
Compressors do not have filters so they do not want detergents, they want the dirt to settle out. The IR compressor is kind of a semi pro unit with a longer intended life than consumer grade but I believe it still uses reed valves. This is opposed to disc valves that run forever. Some will use it in their repair shop and it will run several hours a day. This compressor is supposed to last in that environment for 20-30 years with maybe a occasional reed valve replacement. Then you do need to adhere to the oil requirement in that use.. Home use is so much less hours that any oil changed once and a while will work. When we started our business we used a reed valve IR 2 stage. It ran with a 20 to 25% duty cycle for 5 years with no failure and was not heated in the winter, It is now the backup compressor. I think any decent quality cast iron compressor will run the rest of your life on any oil regardless in home use. If it is real cold you might start it with the tank vented and let it run for a few minutes to heat the oil before you let it build pressure. Rod
IR is not pro grade anymore. Indian pumps, Chinese motors.
 
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12,164
Location
Indiana
Thread starter
Originally Posted by maxdustington
Originally Posted by ragtoplvr
Compressors do not have filters so they do not want detergents, they want the dirt to settle out. The IR compressor is kind of a semi pro unit with a longer intended life than consumer grade but I believe it still uses reed valves. This is opposed to disc valves that run forever. Some will use it in their repair shop and it will run several hours a day. This compressor is supposed to last in that environment for 20-30 years with maybe a occasional reed valve replacement. Then you do need to adhere to the oil requirement in that use.. Home use is so much less hours that any oil changed once and a while will work. When we started our business we used a reed valve IR 2 stage. It ran with a 20 to 25% duty cycle for 5 years with no failure and was not heated in the winter, It is now the backup compressor. I think any decent quality cast iron compressor will run the rest of your life on any oil regardless in home use. If it is real cold you might start it with the tank vented and let it run for a few minutes to heat the oil before you let it build pressure. Rod
IR is not pro grade anymore. Indian pumps, Chinese motors.
Some pumps are Chinese. Others are Indian. I'll have to recheck, but my motor was made in Mexico.
 
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6,748
Location
Lake Havasu City, Arizona
Originally Posted by ragtoplvr
Compressors do not have filters so they do not want detergents, they want the dirt to settle out. Rod
In theory that's true. I will only add that I ran my compressor on average at least once to twice a week for almost 30 years before I decided to change the oil. I was surprised to find it came out just as clean as it went in. I refilled it with Mobil 1 0W-30, and I'm not going to worry about it again.
 
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12,164
Location
Indiana
Thread starter
Originally Posted by jakewells
They do sell all season compressor oil that is what i use.
That's currently what I'm using. It's my understanding that it's around the 30 weight range.
 
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15,388
Location
In the shop
Originally Posted by xxch4osxx
Originally Posted by Lubener
SAE 20 non detergent goes into my compressor.
Where do you get the 20 weight ND oil?
Probably Rural King
 
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4,216
Location
Parts Unknown
Originally Posted by xxch4osxx
Originally Posted by Lubener
SAE 20 non detergent goes into my compressor.
Where do you get the 20 weight ND oil?
The local, privately owned, mom and pop auto parts store near me. You won't find it at the ridiculous chain stores.
 
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