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#2795826 - 11/07/12 05:29 PM Seafoam
hockeyfun1 Offline


Registered: 02/21/12
Posts: 51
Loc: New York
If I put half a bottle of Seafoam where I normally pour in oil to top it off, how many miles is ok to drive it around like that?

The can says something to the effect of "drive a little bit, then get an oil change" and "use for long term cleaning" but I'm worried that leaving it in there too long would cause damage.

This is for a 2001 Ford Ranger XLT 2.5L engine with 165k miles. I ran Seafoam around 150k miles through the vaccum or whatever that is, then around 155k miles, I had a friend do the 3M kit (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003YJ47JO/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i01) on the truck.

I run synthetic and have been running it since 150k miles. Always used to run regular dino from the 10 minute quick changes (I know that's bad! lol) before that, but I need the longer OCI now.
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#2795842 - 11/07/12 05:46 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
jeepman3071 Offline


Registered: 04/15/10
Posts: 1748
Loc: Storrs, Connecticut
I wouldn't top off your Ranger with seafoam. It is a good cleaner, and I've used it, but its very strong. Seafoam in the oil is meant to be run right before an oil change. It is aggressive and can loosen lots of [censored] in your engine. Some guys just pour it in right before changing the oil, idle the engine for a few minutes, then change it.

Marvel Mystery Oil can be run (at the specified ratio on the bottle) for a 3,000 mile oil change if you'd like. I think that defeats the purpose of running synthetic though. If your truck leaks or burns oil over your oil change interval, I would just top off with more of the synthetic. thumbsup
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#2795849 - 11/07/12 05:54 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
hockeyfun1 Offline


Registered: 02/21/12
Posts: 51
Loc: New York
Sorry, I wasn't clear. I pour the Seafoam WHERE I top off the oil. I think it's called the crankcase, but I'm not sure. I'm not looking to top off with Seafoam.
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#2795884 - 11/07/12 06:22 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
OVERKILL Offline


Registered: 04/28/08
Posts: 26369
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: hockeyfun1
Sorry, I wasn't clear. I pour the Seafoam WHERE I top off the oil. I think it's called the crankcase, but I'm not sure. I'm not looking to top off with Seafoam.


If you put in Seafoam instead of oil, you topped off with Seafoam. Yes, that place is called your crankcase.

Just use decent oil and leave the solvents out.
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#2795931 - 11/07/12 07:04 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
hockeyfun1 Offline


Registered: 02/21/12
Posts: 51
Loc: New York
My oil level was fine to begin with. My poor choice of words said otherwise. I "added" Seafoam to my crankcase.

So, how long is ok to keep Seafoam in my crankcase before I need an oil change?
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#2795941 - 11/07/12 07:12 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
mechtech2 Offline


Registered: 09/05/06
Posts: 19479
Loc: Chicago Area
How many miles is good to drive around with seafoam?
answer: Zero

Run seafoam through the vacuum line?
answer: Never

Running dino is bad?
answer: Just plain silly to think dino is bad


Edited by mechtech2 (11/07/12 07:13 PM)

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#2795948 - 11/07/12 07:15 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: mechtech2]
OVERKILL Offline


Registered: 04/28/08
Posts: 26369
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: mechtech2
How many miles is good to drive around with seafoam?
answer: Zero

Run seafoam through the vacuum line?
answer: Never

Running dino is bad?
answer: Just plain silly to think dino is bad


+1 LOL smile
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#2796155 - 11/07/12 10:29 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: mechtech2]
antiqueshell Offline


Registered: 03/02/12
Posts: 4220
Loc: chicago, Illinois
Originally Posted By: mechtech2
How many miles is good to drive around with seafoam?
answer: Zero

Run seafoam through the vacuum line?
answer: Never

Running dino is bad?
answer: Just plain silly to think dino is bad



Listen to mechtech2!

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#2796252 - 11/08/12 03:01 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
jjcom Offline


Registered: 09/19/11
Posts: 181
Loc: Illinois
I've used Seafoam with great results before...it'll quiet down sticky lifters in GM motors almost 100% of the time in my experience. I'll run a whole can at idle for 15 minutes or so to quiet down sticky lifters or run about a half can for 50 miles. Either way seems to help quiet lifters and clean out extra gunk.
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#2796283 - 11/08/12 05:14 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
LeakySeals Offline


Registered: 02/18/11
Posts: 5070
Loc: MA
Seafoam was created by a fisherman as a top end lube and fuel stabilizer for boat problems back in the 1930's. So you have nothing to worry about because its not doing anything other than thinning your oil.

When added to gas you get a octane boost from the IPA which gives euphoria for a tankful. Down the road your cat will thank you with a P0420 for all the pale oil.
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#2796355 - 11/08/12 07:33 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: jjcom]
NHHEMI Offline


Registered: 07/06/07
Posts: 5136
Loc: NH
Originally Posted By: jjcom
I've used Seafoam with great results before...it'll quiet down sticky lifters in GM motors almost 100% of the time in my experience. I'll run a whole can at idle for 15 minutes or so to quiet down sticky lifters or run about a half can for 50 miles. Either way seems to help quiet lifters and clean out extra gunk.


I too have used it for similar reasons and it works great. I always run a full can in the crankcase. Also works very good at removing moisture from the crankcase and as an engine flush. I generally stick to running it for 15-20 minutes at idle vs driving with it in there but in really stubborn situations( i.e. sticking lifters )I have driven as much as 200 miles with it in there( only on an engine I know is basically clean )to get the lifters free.

IMO run it for 15-20 minutes or drive for approx 25 miles then change the oil. Seafoam added to your oil will NOT hurt anything! At least not in and of itself. If you have a really sludged up engine and you add it and then drive and drive and drive it could lead to a blocked oil pickup and oil filter and thus engine damage. Not the actual Seafoam causing the harm though.

I know of people who ad a full can at every oil change and never had any issues. I personally wouldn't do that but it just shows it is ok to use.


Edited by NHHEMI (11/08/12 07:34 AM)
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#2796363 - 11/08/12 07:47 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
Mr_Incredible Offline


Registered: 01/02/07
Posts: 1376
Loc: Nebraska
From the Seafoam site, pertaining to engine cleaning:

"Performing a Sea Foam Engine Treatment on a Fuel Injected Engine

Begin by parking the vehicle in a well ventilated area. Locate a vacuum line that you are certain DISTRIBUTES EVENLY TO ALL CYLINDERS. On many vehicles the easiest option is taking the vacuum line from your brake booster PCV. "

Pertaining to using it in the oil:

"To clean built-up oil residues and contamination from the crank case, add 1 oz. Sea Foam to each quart of engine oil. Sea Foam will slowly re-liquefy residues and suspend contaminants for easy removal. Monitor oil for color and clarity and change oil and replace filter when oil looks dirty."

I've done both. No problems. I've run it in the oil for several hundred miles prior to an oil change. No problems.

As with any additive, know what you're doing before you do it, and keep an eye on things. And, most importantly, Google is your friend and take any "advice" with a grain of salt. Caveat Emptor.
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#2796383 - 11/08/12 08:10 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
Char Baby Offline


Registered: 05/25/05
Posts: 7287
Loc: Rochester NY
I guess what the members are saying is:
Change the oil/filter NOW!

Run the engine ~20 minutes and drain. These engines typicaly don't need engine flushes especially since you use known/very good synthetic oils which already have good cleaner in'em and will do very well in your engine.

Some folks may recomend a Dino Oil Rinse Cycle for about 1000 miles, IDK!

Staying with your OCI regime, your engine will likely outlast the rest of the truck.


Edited by Char Baby (11/08/12 08:12 AM)
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#2796409 - 11/08/12 08:39 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: mechtech2]
skyship Offline


Registered: 06/09/12
Posts: 2071
Loc: Tettnang, Baden-Wurttemberg, G...
Originally Posted By: mechtech2
How many miles is good to drive around with seafoam?
answer: Zero
Run seafoam through the vacuum line?
answer: Never
Running dino is bad?
answer: Just plain silly to think dino is bad


At least one person is talking sense! Almost every engine manufacturer includes a warning about oil additives and how damaging they can be. Using an oil flush additive for 10 minutes at idle just before an oil change seems to be safe and I know some of the dealers and garages do that when changing oil in older cars, BUT driving around with any kind of oil additive that says it can remove sludge is very risky, particularly as regards the turbo bearings.
Seafoam, Marvel oil and all the other Snake oils were used with some limited success in old non turbo engines that had very tollerant oil systems that were unlikely to block and large oil pump intake screens. Modern engines are different and far more easily damaged by dislodged debris.
If you suspect your engine is grubby and don't want to get it cleaned properly, just switch to using a top quality oil that has a high detergent content and do some shorter OCI's.
Every engine manufacturer publishes procedures for cleaning an engine of sludge or varnish, but many folks prefer to just look at a nice shiny bottle of snake oil and then think their advertising is the gospel itself.


Edited by skyship (11/08/12 08:40 AM)

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#2796435 - 11/08/12 09:11 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
PZR2874 Offline


Registered: 05/06/11
Posts: 499
Loc: San Antonio, TX
Using SeaFoam and snake oil in the same sentence is just plain ignorance.
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#2796465 - 11/08/12 09:41 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: PZR2874]
Bgallagher Offline


Registered: 04/17/12
Posts: 1232
Loc: Boston, MA
Originally Posted By: PZR2874
Using SeaFoam and snake oil in the same sentence is just plain ignorance.


+1 Seafoam works. Don't lump it in with Lucasoil and the STPs. True snakeoils
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#2796563 - 11/08/12 11:39 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: PZR2874]
OVERKILL Offline


Registered: 04/28/08
Posts: 26369
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: PZR2874
Using SeaFoam and snake oil in the same sentence is just plain ignorance.


I don't think it has anything to do with ignorance, perhaps more with what one defines a "snake oil" as.

As a cleaner, Seafoam works reasonably well. That's what you get with something based on stoddard solvent.... a cleaner.

As a lubricant, well, I'm betting it is no better than WD40 based on the addition of bright stock to the stoddard solvent.

Though we must not forget that hint of oil of wintergreen for the enticing fragrance! LOL!

So, for those willing to dump WD40 into their crankcase for it's "mad cleaning powaz, yo!" then yes, I'm sure they would be served equally as well with Seafoam.

HOWEVER

For those who don't feel that entertaining the idea of putting solvent in with their engine oil and driving about is all that bright, then yes, I'd imagine that calling it a "snake oil" in this context is quite accurate.

My owners manual doesn't say "don't put additives in with your engine oil, except Seafoam because it's the freakin' bees knees and will rock you out so hard your gums are going to bleed". No, it doesn't say anything of the sort. Manufacturers advise that you use an engine oil meeting the approvals required for your vehicle in the sump. They advise this because they designed the bloody engine and probably know what they are talking about.

And it isn't that manufacturers are opposed to additives and treaments in general. Ford sells Motorcraft injector cleaner, fuel system treatment....etc. GM sells their combustion chamber cleaner, Engine Oil Supplement, injector cleaner...etc and so does Mother Mopar. But none of them sell magic crankcase solvent and there is likely a reason for that.
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#2796675 - 11/08/12 01:26 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
PZR2874 Offline


Registered: 05/06/11
Posts: 499
Loc: San Antonio, TX
Good post OVERK1LL

The reason is "we are in the market to sell cars and our brethren dealer's are here for service".

Nothing more, nothing less.

Some people have the know how/how to.... no need for Mechanics/dealers/snake oils....
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#2796740 - 11/08/12 02:29 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: PZR2874]
OVERKILL Offline


Registered: 04/28/08
Posts: 26369
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: PZR2874
Good post OVERK1LL

The reason is "we are in the market to sell cars and our brethren dealer's are here for service".

Nothing more, nothing less.

Some people have the know how/how to.... no need for Mechanics/dealers/snake oils....


I've maintained many an engine. I've also torn down a number of engines over the years. A properly maintained engine (read: an engine maintained in the manner in which the manufacturer prescribes) will in most cases, barring a design defect, outlast the vehicle it is fitted to. This means changing the oil, maintaining the PCV system and keeping it in tune. No additives needed.

I've never owned an engine that needed stoddard solvent dumped in the crank case to clean something up. Some gentle cleaning was done on my Expedition by Mobil 1 and Redline lubricants after a life on dealer bulk oil for the 150,000Km that were put on it before we owned it.

Seafoam works reasonable well for cleaning a Ford IAC valve for example. Dissolving carbon, used on a rag to remove varnish....etc. But I don't think it has any place in a crankcase. Oils are designed to keep an engine clean when changed at the prescribed interval dictated by the OEM or oil manufacturer (depending on who's schedule you follow) and my experience has shown me that this works quite well. Diluting a properly formulated lubricant with solvent and bright stock not only thins the oil, but effects its lubricity, dilutes the additive package and essentially makes it less effective at what it was designed to do: properly lubricate your engine.

On a poorly maintained engine, while I can see the solvent breaking free deposits in the crankcase, I can also see those deposits clogging a filter, blocking the pick-up....etc. And even if this "cleaning" is deemed effective based on its use in this type of scenario, to what end? What has the dilution of the lubricant with a solvent done to the lubricant's effectiveness at its primary role?

There is a reason Mobil, Shell, Castrol, the Conoco family...etc don't manufacture solvents to dump in your crankcase. It isn't like they don't have the capability. Heck, it isn't like they don't already manufacture solvents. So this begs the question as to how much sense it really makes to be doing something that nobody but the blender of the solvent-based product recommends doing to your vehicle.
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#2796841 - 11/08/12 04:12 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: PZR2874]
NHHEMI Offline


Registered: 07/06/07
Posts: 5136
Loc: NH
Originally Posted By: PZR2874
Using SeaFoam and snake oil in the same sentence is just plain ignorance.


Agreed. duh
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#2796849 - 11/08/12 04:21 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
jjcom Offline


Registered: 09/19/11
Posts: 181
Loc: Illinois
For the most part, I'd have to agree that extra additives aren't normally needed in a well maintained motor. But you do run across cars that have been well maintained that end up needing something.

My 96 Grand Prix I feel is a pretty good example of this. It was a dealer demo car for the first year or of it's life. Oil was changed every 3k at the dealership. Then the previous owners to me bought it and changed the oil every 2500-3000 miles with Pennzoil. I don't know how the car was used at the dealership, but for the previous owners, it was a commuter car. All the miles were highway, so the OCI was rather short considering. Then I bought the car with 130k miles on it. Somewhere about 140k miles, after I had been running Mobil 1 changing it every 3k miles as well...I had a lifter get stuck. From everything thats on here, a diet of Pennzoil and Mobil 1 should have really left the engine very clean. And if you looked through the filler cap, it was quite clean looking. Unfortunately, the lifter was still ticking very loudly. Dumped a can of Seafoam in and in a short while that tick turned into a light tap, then was completely gone within a few minutes.

Now I could have tore into the motor and replaced all the lifters...but I figured I'd try this first. Now I'm at 219k miles, and all is well.
_________________________
1996 Grand Prix 3.1 V6 220,000 Pennzoil Plat 5W30/Wix Filter
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#2796855 - 11/08/12 04:30 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: OVERKILL]
NHHEMI Offline


Registered: 07/06/07
Posts: 5136
Loc: NH
Originally Posted By: OVERK1LL

As a cleaner, Seafoam works reasonably well. That's what you get with something based on stoddard solvent.... a cleaner.

As a lubricant, well, I'm betting it is no better than WD40 based on the addition of bright stock to the stoddard solvent.


Who said Seafoam was to be used as a lubricant? Just because some of us talk about adding it to the crankcase doesn't mean it is being added as a lubricant.

Seafoam is a cleaner. moisture remover, and fuel stabilizer period and end of story. Haven't seen anyone say otherwise. Just because it isn't oil however does not mean it will harm the engine if used properly.

Have you ever used it in your crankcase and had it do something bad? Ever used it in there ever? If not then why are you telling others not to or cracking wise about those of us that have?

Many of us have used it in the crankcase, and done so for years and years, with nothing but great results. Believe it or not many of us are just as anal about our vehicles as you are.
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#2796874 - 11/08/12 04:48 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
GearheadTool Offline


Registered: 03/31/12
Posts: 1711
Loc: Boston, MA
I have never had Seafoam generate any kind of code.

And every engine that has a traditional style PCV (not this Volvo.. I am scared to put Seafoam in its crankcase, though some do for its PCV "system") that I have let it suck up Seafoam through either it or the brake booster line, half a can then sit for an hour on a hot engine.. has 1. Had the smoke show and 2. Ran sooo smoooooth.

I almost with I could with the Volvo but I am doing other things to her. (Redline SI-1 is a go.)
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#2796940 - 11/08/12 05:56 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: GearheadTool]
LeakySeals Offline


Registered: 02/18/11
Posts: 5070
Loc: MA
P0420 here. Had I known its mostly lube (pale oil), would have never used it in the gas. naphtha is the solvent in small amounts. It gets rave reviews, but on paper there's just not enough solvent to make a difference. If you think its made a difference somehow thats all that matters.
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#2796956 - 11/08/12 06:10 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: LeakySeals]
GearheadTool Offline


Registered: 03/31/12
Posts: 1711
Loc: Boston, MA
Originally Posted By: LeakySeals
P0420 here. Had I known its mostly lube (pale oil), would have never used it in the gas. naphtha is the solvent in small amounts. It gets rave reviews, but on paper there's just not enough solvent to make a difference. If you think its made a difference somehow thats all that matters.


Isn't that where it works the best?

I just don't understand. I thought it was a "moderate" strength cleaner. MMO is a "low" strength cleaner, and B12 is a "high" strength cleaner (with Toluene.) It seems that Seafoam is the one you can "feel" when you add it to a tank. That, and Redline SI-1. I used to use Gumout.. until I discovered Redline SI-1.

Now, I only think about Redline SI-1 and SeaFoam (which costs a lot) and leave the others alone.

About to visit the "make your own SeaFoam" thread in Gas Additives. And it still never ruined a car or threw a code for me! Even when heavily overdosed.. if it does "nothing" then ODing... ?

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#2796979 - 11/08/12 06:27 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: GearheadTool]
LeakySeals Offline


Registered: 02/18/11
Posts: 5070
Loc: MA
The 20% IPA (fuel stabilizer) boosts octane levels giving you the "feel it" for a tankful.

I used it as directed, fell for the internet hype. My bad.
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#2797029 - 11/08/12 07:07 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
mechtech2 Offline


Registered: 09/05/06
Posts: 19479
Loc: Chicago Area
Seafoam DOES have it's uses. It is a strong solvent.
I have no problems using it in the gas tank, even though there are far better products nowadays - it's a third choice.
Sometimes in a lawnmower crankcase for a few minutes that has been neglected.

Lifter sticking - Really rare.
Worn or maladjusted lifters/cams - very common.
Seafoam will not build up metal.
We are not using non detergent oils in the 1940s.

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#2797035 - 11/08/12 07:11 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: NHHEMI]
OVERKILL Offline


Registered: 04/28/08
Posts: 26369
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: NHHEMI
Originally Posted By: OVERK1LL

As a cleaner, Seafoam works reasonably well. That's what you get with something based on stoddard solvent.... a cleaner.

As a lubricant, well, I'm betting it is no better than WD40 based on the addition of bright stock to the stoddard solvent.


Who said Seafoam was to be used as a lubricant? Just because some of us talk about adding it to the crankcase doesn't mean it is being added as a lubricant.


Well, the role of what goes in the crankcase is to lubricate the engine, hence, lubricant. So, if you are using Seafoam in the crankcase, it is being used as a lubricant.


Quote:
Seafoam is a cleaner. moisture remover, and fuel stabilizer period and end of story.


Seafoam is stoddard solvent and bright stock with a hint of wintergreen for fragrance. Dress it up all you want, it is very similar to WD40. But I don't see people on here claiming that WD40 should be put in your crankcase.

Quote:
Haven't seen anyone say otherwise. Just because it isn't oil however does not mean it will harm the engine if used properly.


The fact that it isn't oil is the exact reason as to why it shouldn't be used in the crankcase.

Quote:
Have you ever used it in your crankcase and had it do something bad?


No, because I don't put things that aren't oil in my crankcase.

Quote:
Ever used it in there ever?


See above.

Quote:
If not then why are you telling others not to or cracking wise about those of us that have?


1. Manufacturers specify to not put things that aren't oil in the crankcase.

2. In a device that is pressure and boundary lubricated the only thing I want circulating in that device is a lubricant designed to do just that.

3. If somebody spins a rod bearing on a car under warranty because they thinned their already thin 5w20 with Seafoam in search for its magical abilities and the manufacturer voids their warranty and they are on the hook for a new engine, is Seafoam going to buy them a new engine? Are you?


Quote:
Many of us have used it in the crankcase, and done so for years and years, with nothing but great results. Believe it or not many of us are just as anal about our vehicles as you are.


I would never advocate the use of any product that could potentially void somebody's warranty when used in the crankcase. That's my position and it is a safe (and admittedly conservative) one.

Seafoam through the vacuum line, as a piston soak, as a cleaner....etc, those uses I am perfectly fine with and with people recommending them.
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#2797322 - 11/09/12 04:50 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
LeakySeals Offline


Registered: 02/18/11
Posts: 5070
Loc: MA
MMO smells like wintergreen too.
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#2797325 - 11/09/12 04:59 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: LeakySeals]
TDOHGL01 Offline


Registered: 03/06/12
Posts: 104
Loc: VT
I've used seafoam in the crankcase for the full 3,000 miles it said you could and only did the 1.5oz per quart of oil like it says and had no problem with it and even made my oil stay cleaner the second time I did it, but now I use Amsoil Signature Series and do not use any additives with it at all, so I can get 10k to 15k miles out of it.
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#2797336 - 11/09/12 05:47 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: LeakySeals]
LeakySeals Offline


Registered: 02/18/11
Posts: 5070
Loc: MA
Lets compare seafoam to another product...
Code:
Seafoam
Pale Oil    40.00 - 60.00% (lube)            cas 64742-54-7 
Naphtha     25.00 - 35.00% (solvent/cleaner) cas 64742-49-0 
IPA         10.00 - 20.00% (fuel stabilizer) cas 67-63-0

STA-BIL/Fuel stabilizer
Proprietary         5%      ?                cas 000000-00-8
Naphtha             95%    (solvent/cleaner) cas 64742-53-6 

Naphtha is a class of products containing varying degrees of naphtha, as well as various other chemicals (what the cas# refers to) If Naphtha is the primary solvent in both products, which one would give better results? 30% or 95%?
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#2797337 - 11/09/12 05:48 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: LeakySeals]
demarpaint Offline


Registered: 07/03/05
Posts: 21301
Loc: NY
Originally Posted By: LeakySeals
MMO smells like wintergreen too.


There is some in it.
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#2797394 - 11/09/12 07:36 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: demarpaint]
OVERKILL Offline


Registered: 04/28/08
Posts: 26369
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: demarpaint
Originally Posted By: LeakySeals
MMO smells like wintergreen too.


There is some in it.


Yup. IIRC, it is majority light pale oil though, something like 2cSt with some stoddard solvent and some oil of wintergreen.
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#2797405 - 11/09/12 07:54 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
Mr_Incredible Offline


Registered: 01/02/07
Posts: 1376
Loc: Nebraska
I prefer Seafoam to Sta-Bil. I've used it for 20 years and have nothing but good things to say about it for that purpose. Sta-Bil left evaporated gas darker, with a thicker consistency, while Seafoam didn't do either.

I've used Seafoam in motorcycles for decades as well. It has cleaned out varnish and gunk from old bikes recently purchased and made them run like silk.

I've used it in the crankcase for hundreds of miles with no ill effects. I've sucked it up through vacuum lines with no ill effects.

I've used it. I have no issues with it. If someone is basing their OPINION on a general, personal aversion to anything other than oil in the crankcase, that's one thing. Asserting them vehemently, and somewhat snobbishly, as FACT, in the face of real users with real stories, is just plain silly.

And we all know what opinions are worth.
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#2797417 - 11/09/12 08:18 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: Mr_Incredible]
OVERKILL Offline


Registered: 04/28/08
Posts: 26369
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: Mr_Incredible
I prefer Seafoam to Sta-Bil. I've used it for 20 years and have nothing but good things to say about it for that purpose. Sta-Bil left evaporated gas darker, with a thicker consistency, while Seafoam didn't do either.

I've used Seafoam in motorcycles for decades as well. It has cleaned out varnish and gunk from old bikes recently purchased and made them run like silk.

I've used it in the crankcase for hundreds of miles with no ill effects. I've sucked it up through vacuum lines with no ill effects.

I've used it. I have no issues with it. If someone is basing their OPINION on a general, personal aversion to anything other than oil in the crankcase, that's one thing. Asserting them vehemently, and somewhat snobbishly, as FACT, in the face of real users with real stories, is just plain silly.

And we all know what opinions are worth.


Just a couple of points:

1. My OPINION goes hand-in-hand with the recommendations of the manufacturers. Who clearly state you can void your warranty dumping something other than an approved lubricant in your crankcase.

2. My OPINION is also based on years of experience using nothing but good oil, changed at an appropriate interval in the crankcase of everything ranging from a 425HP Ford Y-block to lawn mowers. This includes tear downs for upgrades and gasket replacements.

The difference here is that my opinion and recommendation doesn't potentially void anybody's warranty. That makes my advice safe.

The issue you and others advocating the use of this product in the crankcase have with my position here is that I'm being vocal about it. You appear to think that just because you've used it in your crankcase with no ill effects means that it is safe to deal this recommendation out to other people without the requisite disclaimer about following the owners manual while under warranty and that you aren't liable if your advice causes epic engine failure.

The difference between my opinion and yours sir, is that mine considers the recommendations of the manufacturer as part of it, whilst yours does not. This makes my advice safer than yours. That's fine if you don't agree with it, but it is no less valuable than your faceless advice and Internet testimony which carry no more weight than my own.


Edit: I will also add that I have absolutely nothing against the use of the product as a stabilizer, cleanser or soak. I've mentioned that many times. I am not trying to be rude, snobby or the host of other adjectives I'm sure you'd love to use to describe me here. I'm simply trying to be clear about my position on the use of additives, particularly those that are solvent-based in the crankcase and my reasoning behind that position which has everything to due with the liability of dealing out advice that could potentially cause issues for those under warranty if something bad were to happen.


Edited by OVERK1LL (11/09/12 08:26 AM)
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#2797472 - 11/09/12 09:31 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
BillyTheKid Offline


Registered: 10/12/11
Posts: 416
Loc: ny
I love all the different views on this thread, well most on this site. That is why I am on this site several times per day.

My take on this (and I don't know all that much) is they would not advertise it can be put in this or that (tank, pan, injectors, etc), and open themselves up for a lawsuit if it will destroy things. There is no company going to put themselves in that position. With that said, I would say it can be done under their recommendations and not a [censored] thing will go wrong. I also believe it takes a heck of A LOT to hurt or destroy an engine of today! I have seen worse things done to engines or even put in them than this Seafoam or MMO or whatever. Heck, I was given a car some years ago from someone. Long before I had an idea of even checking oil or any of that. I was happy I was getting something free. The car sat dormant in the outdoor NY weather for over 3 years. We jumped it and it stated (bingo not even a battery needed) and continued to run. Change the oil?? At that age all I cared about was having money to put gas in it to drive. Well I had the car well over a year. It started perfect each morning. Check the oil, not once! The only reason the car was not held on to longer was a cousin crashed it on me when I let him use it. The engine was still purring fine and the junker was happy to be getting something he could yank the engine and resell. Who know who it went to and how long it kept running?

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#2797484 - 11/09/12 09:42 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
demarpaint Offline


Registered: 07/03/05
Posts: 21301
Loc: NY
My question is this, why would you add Seafoam or any engine cleaning product to a new engine that's already clean? I never had the need to add a cleaning product to a new engine under warranty that was running fine. OTOH if I had a problem with an older vehicle, or needed to clean an engine, I'd have no problem adding either one of my favorite engine cleaners to the oil.

Although I've never added Seafoam to oil I'm pretty sure it won't wreck the engine. If it did we'd know it by now. JMO
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#2797491 - 11/09/12 09:47 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: OVERKILL]
skyship Offline


Registered: 06/09/12
Posts: 2071
Loc: Tettnang, Baden-Wurttemberg, G...
Originally Posted By: OVERK1LL
Originally Posted By: Mr_Incredible
I prefer Seafoam to Sta-Bil. I've used it for 20 years and have nothing but good things to say about it for that purpose. Sta-Bil left evaporated gas darker, with a thicker consistency, while Seafoam didn't do either.
I've used Seafoam in motorcycles for decades as well. It has cleaned out varnish and gunk from old bikes recently purchased and made them run like silk.
I've used it in the crankcase for hundreds of miles with no ill effects. I've sucked it up through vacuum lines with no ill effects.
I've used it. I have no issues with it. If someone is basing their OPINION on a general, personal aversion to anything other than oil in the crankcase, that's one thing. Asserting them vehemently, and somewhat snobbishly, as FACT, in the face of real users with real stories, is just plain silly.
And we all know what opinions are worth.

Just a couple of points:

1. My OPINION goes hand-in-hand with the recommendations of the manufacturers. Who clearly state you can void your warranty dumping something other than an approved lubricant in your crankcase.

2. My OPINION is also based on years of experience using nothing but good oil, changed at an appropriate interval in the crankcase of everything ranging from a 425HP Ford Y-block to lawn mowers. This includes tear downs for upgrades and gasket replacements.

The difference here is that my opinion and recommendation doesn't potentially void anybody's warranty. That makes my advice safe.

The issue you and others advocating the use of this product in the crankcase have with my position here is that I'm being vocal about it. You appear to think that just because you've used it in your crankcase with no ill effects means that it is safe to deal this recommendation out to other people without the requisite disclaimer about following the owners manual while under warranty and that you aren't liable if your advice causes epic engine failure.

The difference between my opinion and yours sir, is that mine considers the recommendations of the manufacturer as part of it, whilst yours does not. This makes my advice safer than yours. That's fine if you don't agree with it, but it is no less valuable than your faceless advice and Internet testimony which carry no more weight than my own.


Edit: I will also add that I have absolutely nothing against the use of the product as a stabilizer, cleanser or soak. I've mentioned that many times. I am not trying to be rude, snobby or the host of other adjectives I'm sure you'd love to use to describe me here. I'm simply trying to be clear about my position on the use of additives, particularly those that are solvent-based in the crankcase and my reasoning behind that position which has everything to due with the liability of dealing out advice that could potentially cause issues for those under warranty if something bad were to happen.


Very correct! But some folks never read the cars handbook or engine maintenance manual and prefer to read snake oil advertising.

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#2797503 - 11/09/12 10:00 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
LeakySeals Offline


Registered: 02/18/11
Posts: 5070
Loc: MA
The point I was making by comparison is clear. Even though STA-BIL has more than twice the solvent strength of Seafoam, people prefer the Seafoam. One can only assume its all in the name. With a name like Seafoam, its gotta be good.
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#2797670 - 11/09/12 12:41 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: OVERKILL]
NHHEMI Offline


Registered: 07/06/07
Posts: 5136
Loc: NH
Originally Posted By: OVERK1LL
Originally Posted By: NHHEMI
Originally Posted By: OVERK1LL

As a cleaner, Seafoam works reasonably well. That's what you get with something based on stoddard solvent.... a cleaner.

As a lubricant, well, I'm betting it is no better than WD40 based on the addition of bright stock to the stoddard solvent.


Who said Seafoam was to be used as a lubricant? Just because some of us talk about adding it to the crankcase doesn't mean it is being added as a lubricant.


Well, the role of what goes in the crankcase is to lubricate the engine, hence, lubricant. So, if you are using Seafoam in the crankcase, it is being used as a lubricant.


Quote:
Seafoam is a cleaner. moisture remover, and fuel stabilizer period and end of story.


Seafoam is stoddard solvent and bright stock with a hint of wintergreen for fragrance. Dress it up all you want, it is very similar to WD40. But I don't see people on here claiming that WD40 should be put in your crankcase.

Quote:
Haven't seen anyone say otherwise. Just because it isn't oil however does not mean it will harm the engine if used properly.


The fact that it isn't oil is the exact reason as to why it shouldn't be used in the crankcase.

Quote:
Have you ever used it in your crankcase and had it do something bad?


No, because I don't put things that aren't oil in my crankcase.

Quote:
Ever used it in there ever?


See above.

Quote:
If not then why are you telling others not to or cracking wise about those of us that have?


1. Manufacturers specify to not put things that aren't oil in the crankcase.

2. In a device that is pressure and boundary lubricated the only thing I want circulating in that device is a lubricant designed to do just that.

3. If somebody spins a rod bearing on a car under warranty because they thinned their already thin 5w20 with Seafoam in search for its magical abilities and the manufacturer voids their warranty and they are on the hook for a new engine, is Seafoam going to buy them a new engine? Are you?


Quote:
Many of us have used it in the crankcase, and done so for years and years, with nothing but great results. Believe it or not many of us are just as anal about our vehicles as you are.


I would never advocate the use of any product that could potentially void somebody's warranty when used in the crankcase. That's my position and it is a safe (and admittedly conservative) one.

Seafoam through the vacuum line, as a piston soak, as a cleaner....etc, those uses I am perfectly fine with and with people recommending them.


If you never have used it then your opinion means little. Especially to those who have.
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#2797677 - 11/09/12 12:43 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: NHHEMI]
OVERKILL Offline


Registered: 04/28/08
Posts: 26369
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: NHHEMI
Originally Posted By: OVERK1LL
Originally Posted By: NHHEMI
Originally Posted By: OVERK1LL

As a cleaner, Seafoam works reasonably well. That's what you get with something based on stoddard solvent.... a cleaner.

As a lubricant, well, I'm betting it is no better than WD40 based on the addition of bright stock to the stoddard solvent.


Who said Seafoam was to be used as a lubricant? Just because some of us talk about adding it to the crankcase doesn't mean it is being added as a lubricant.


Well, the role of what goes in the crankcase is to lubricate the engine, hence, lubricant. So, if you are using Seafoam in the crankcase, it is being used as a lubricant.


Quote:
Seafoam is a cleaner. moisture remover, and fuel stabilizer period and end of story.


Seafoam is stoddard solvent and bright stock with a hint of wintergreen for fragrance. Dress it up all you want, it is very similar to WD40. But I don't see people on here claiming that WD40 should be put in your crankcase.

Quote:
Haven't seen anyone say otherwise. Just because it isn't oil however does not mean it will harm the engine if used properly.


The fact that it isn't oil is the exact reason as to why it shouldn't be used in the crankcase.

Quote:
Have you ever used it in your crankcase and had it do something bad?


No, because I don't put things that aren't oil in my crankcase.

Quote:
Ever used it in there ever?


See above.

Quote:
If not then why are you telling others not to or cracking wise about those of us that have?


1. Manufacturers specify to not put things that aren't oil in the crankcase.

2. In a device that is pressure and boundary lubricated the only thing I want circulating in that device is a lubricant designed to do just that.

3. If somebody spins a rod bearing on a car under warranty because they thinned their already thin 5w20 with Seafoam in search for its magical abilities and the manufacturer voids their warranty and they are on the hook for a new engine, is Seafoam going to buy them a new engine? Are you?


Quote:
Many of us have used it in the crankcase, and done so for years and years, with nothing but great results. Believe it or not many of us are just as anal about our vehicles as you are.


I would never advocate the use of any product that could potentially void somebody's warranty when used in the crankcase. That's my position and it is a safe (and admittedly conservative) one.

Seafoam through the vacuum line, as a piston soak, as a cleaner....etc, those uses I am perfectly fine with and with people recommending them.


If you never have used it then your opinion means little. Especially to those who have.


I didn't say I haven't used it. I said I haven't used it in my crankcase and gave a rather in depth explanation as to why. If you want to run horse pee in your crankcase, go right ahead. Just keep in mind if you start telling people that it is a good idea, I'm going to post the same thing about horse pee.

This isn't about seafoam, it is about putting things that don't belong in the crankcase, in the crankcase. And ALL of the auto manufacturers agree with me on this stance, so it isn't like I'm forging ahead with this crusade on my own with no basis for my argument........
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#2797700 - 11/09/12 01:02 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
OVERKILL Offline


Registered: 04/28/08
Posts: 26369
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Ford's stance:


BMW's stance:


If you'd like further examples, just take a look in your owners manual. This isn't some baseless posturing to cause you undue grief, it is the stance of the automotive manufacturers and can cause warranty issues for people still covered by their powertrain warranty.
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#2797706 - 11/09/12 01:09 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
KCJeep Offline


Registered: 06/30/11
Posts: 4608
Loc: Mahzurrah!
A typical manufacturers stance, and I don't blame them a bit. You think Ford is going to sort through or test hundreds of products and then list a handful that my be useful? Not a chance, much easier to just say "don't do it", which is what I would also do if I were in their shoes.

And many will turn right around and sell various bottled fixes in their very own service department, but that they can control, which is the point.
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#2797712 - 11/09/12 01:13 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: KCJeep]
OVERKILL Offline


Registered: 04/28/08
Posts: 26369
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: KCJeep
A typical manufacturers stance, and I don't blame them a bit. You think Ford is going to sort through or test hundreds of products and then list a handful that my be useful? Not a chance, much easier to just say "don't do it", which is what I would also do if I were in their shoes.

And many will turn right around and sell various bottled fixes in their very own service department, but that they can control, which is the point.


They certainly do, I listed them earlier in the thread. But none of those go in the crankcase that I've ever seen. Fuel treatments, throttle body cleaners, carbon removers.....etc all kinds of additives. Just not crankcase ones.

One exception would be GM EOS, but then it isn't a solvent either.
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#2797874 - 11/09/12 04:06 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: OVERKILL]
skyship Offline


Registered: 06/09/12
Posts: 2071
Loc: Tettnang, Baden-Wurttemberg, G...
Just to clarify one point, I'm not anti fuel additives if they are approved or recommended by an engine manufacturer and a number of fuel additives are, BUT most cars that use good quality fuel will never need a fuel additive. If you do have to buy poor quality fuel then the situation is different.
A lot of people use fuel additives because they think they protect the injectors from wearing out or failing, when they don't. The two main reasons for injector failures are bad fuel filitration and corrosion due to lack of use.

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#2798007 - 11/09/12 06:58 PM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
mechtech2 Offline


Registered: 09/05/06
Posts: 19479
Loc: Chicago Area
How do you know that you had "no Problems"?
The engine still ran. What damage or wear did you cause? what loss of longevity?

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#2798272 - 11/10/12 05:26 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: OVERKILL]
SteveSRT8 Offline


Registered: 10/10/08
Posts: 15101
Loc: Sunny Florida
Originally Posted By: OVERK1LL

If you'd like further examples, just take a look in your owners manual. This isn't some baseless posturing to cause you undue grief, it is the stance of the automotive manufacturers and can cause warranty issues for people still covered by their powertrain warranty.


Absolutely agreed as long as warranty is in play. it's downright risky to play with that unless you are financially prepared to take the hit.
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#2798392 - 11/10/12 09:38 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: SteveSRT8]
NHHEMI Offline


Registered: 07/06/07
Posts: 5136
Loc: NH
Originally Posted By: OVERK1LL

If you'd like further examples, just take a look in your owners manual. This isn't some baseless posturing to cause you undue grief, it is the stance of the automotive manufacturers and can cause warranty issues for people still covered by their powertrain warranty.


There is no way a car mfg will know you used Seafoam in your crankcase for 15 minutes/25 miles "if" it caused a problem. Not unless the vehicle was towed in and the Seafoam was still in the crankcase and they tested the oil. Other than them being able to test the oil to discover it they have no way of knowing. Well, unless you tell them.

I am a huge "follow the warranty requirements guy" as any regular member here knows from my years of posting. On this issue though it seems like a very lame reason not to use Seafoam( not meant to be offensive ). Car mfg's tell us all kinds of things not to use/do that we all know are perfectly ok to use/do. Just their way of covering themselves if by some remote chance that thing did cause an issue.

Seafoam has a very long and well documented history of doing what it is advertised as doing. "IF" it was going to harm the engine if run in the crankcase there would be plenty of proof out there by now. The mfg would have been sued and more than likely stopped recommending it's use in that way as well. Just not the case. There are more documented instances out there of an oil filter failing and taking an engine out than problems with Seafoam( in the crankcase ).

I think some of you are just tilting at windmills here.
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#2798394 - 11/10/12 09:40 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: OVERKILL]
NHHEMI Offline


Registered: 07/06/07
Posts: 5136
Loc: NH
Originally Posted By: OVERK1LL

They certainly do, I listed them earlier in the thread. But none of those go in the crankcase that I've ever seen. Fuel treatments, throttle body cleaners, carbon removers.....etc all kinds of additives. Just not crankcase ones.

One exception would be GM EOS, but then it isn't a solvent either.


Not sure if they still offer it or not but when I worked at Ford( local dealer )they offered an engine flush. Came in a Ford can like all the other chemicals.
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#2798410 - 11/10/12 09:49 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: NHHEMI]
OVERKILL Offline


Registered: 04/28/08
Posts: 26369
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: NHHEMI
Originally Posted By: OVERK1LL

They certainly do, I listed them earlier in the thread. But none of those go in the crankcase that I've ever seen. Fuel treatments, throttle body cleaners, carbon removers.....etc all kinds of additives. Just not crankcase ones.

One exception would be GM EOS, but then it isn't a solvent either.


Not sure if they still offer it or not but when I worked at Ford( local dealer )they offered an engine flush. Came in a Ford can like all the other chemicals.


AMSOIL offers one too. But AFAIK, it also isn't marketed as a solvent for other purposes smile

I've never seen the Ford one, but if they've put their name on it, they are liable for what it does.
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#2798415 - 11/10/12 09:59 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: OVERKILL]
NHHEMI Offline


Registered: 07/06/07
Posts: 5136
Loc: NH
Originally Posted By: OVERK1LL
Originally Posted By: NHHEMI

If you never have used it then your opinion means little. Especially to those who have.


I didn't say I haven't used it. I said I haven't used it in my crankcase and gave a rather in depth explanation as to why. If you want to run horse pee in your crankcase, go right ahead. Just keep in mind if you start telling people that it is a good idea, I'm going to post the same thing about horse pee.

This isn't about seafoam, it is about putting things that don't belong in the crankcase, in the crankcase. And ALL of the auto manufacturers agree with me on this stance, so it isn't like I'm forging ahead with this crusade on my own with no basis for my argument........


The point is we are talking about it being used in the crankcase. You have stated not to that it could harm something, and have argued with those who have used it and basically called them nuts for doing so, yet by your own admission you have never used it in your crankcase. You can spout all the reasons not to use it you wish but they hold little value compared to comments from those who actually have used it( in the crankcase ). Your reasons not to use it( in the crankcase )might hold more validity if there wasn't so much real world proof out there that it works and will not hurt anything. You remind me of the guy walking down the street with the "The World Is Ending" sign hanging off his shoulders trying to scare everyone.

Let's try this. How about you find some examples of Seafoam causing engine damage when used in the crankcase. If it is as bad as you claim it is when used there you should have no problem finding plenty of examples to back up your theories. I hate to throw out that tired old BITOG challenge but it really is appropriate here. Show me real world, and not just in your head, where it has actually harmed a few engines( one is not a conclusive sample - need multiple )when used in the crankcase. Also, try and compare the # you find to the # of positive reviews to see what % of those who have used it in the crankcase have actually had it cause a problem vs those who have not. I bet you could find more engine failures, and a higher % rate, from cheap oil filters failing than from using Seafoam in the crankcase

Remember, no one is saying throw a can in and then hit the drag strip for the weekend or tow a 10,000lbs load across country. It's use is being advocated under controlled situations where it can do it's job and not hurt anything. I will repeat I have used it for years( even longer than RP )and I have never had a problem with it in the crankcase or anywhere else. It is a very good product in my experience. Not crazy about it in the gas tank( better options IMO )but in the crankcase to free sticking lifters, to remove moisture, and as a flush it works very well. Through a vacuum source to clean the CC it also works very well.

If you don't wish to use it I could care less. I just don't see how you can be so adament about not using it( in the crankcase )if you never have and thus have no experience to back up your arguments/stance when discussing this with those of us who have? That is liek me giving a woman advice on giving birth.


Edited by NHHEMI (11/10/12 10:00 AM)
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#2798426 - 11/10/12 10:16 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: NHHEMI]
OVERKILL Offline


Registered: 04/28/08
Posts: 26369
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: NHHEMI
Originally Posted By: OVERK1LL

If you'd like further examples, just take a look in your owners manual. This isn't some baseless posturing to cause you undue grief, it is the stance of the automotive manufacturers and can cause warranty issues for people still covered by their powertrain warranty.


There is no way a car mfg will know you used Seafoam in your crankcase for 15 minutes/25 miles "if" it caused a problem. Not unless the vehicle was towed in and the Seafoam was still in the crankcase and they tested the oil. Other than them being able to test the oil to discover it they have no way of knowing. Well, unless you tell them.


That would be dishonest though, no?

Quote:
I am a huge "follow the warranty requirements guy" as any regular member here knows from my years of posting. On this issue though it seems like a very lame reason not to use Seafoam( not meant to be offensive ). Car mfg's tell us all kinds of things not to use/do that we all know are perfectly ok to use/do. Just their way of covering themselves if by some remote chance that thing did cause an issue.


For an under warranty situation, I think it is a good reason.

For a not under warranty situation, I think as long as the person is made aware of the fact that a solvent, ANY solvent, can be potentially dangerous due to it breaking free large chunks of build-up and clogging the pick-up, the filter....etc and will also thin the oil, and if they know this and continue to go ahead, that's fine.

Quote:
Seafoam has a very long and well documented history of doing what it is advertised as doing. "IF" it was going to harm the engine if run in the crankcase there would be plenty of proof out there by now. The mfg would have been sued and more than likely stopped recommending it's use in that way as well.


Many of the cases I see of people using solvents in their oil on this board are cars that already have serious issues:

-Sludge
-Stuck rings
-Massive varnish build-up
-Smoking

They have a vehicle that is long out of warranty and are faced with either living with the problem(s) or using a cleaner as a less expensive route to avoid having to do a tear down. Because on a lot of these cars, a tear down and rebuild is going to cost more than the car is worth.

If Joe Blow with his Saturn and stuck rings runs Seafoam in his car that drinks 1L/500 miles and it doesn't get better, he's not going to sue Seafoam. And if the engine fails, he's not going to sue them either, as he wouldn't have a leg to stand on.

Now, as far as people I know that use Seafoam, they all use it for the same purposes as I've used it: Cleaning carbon, varnish...etc. I know one guy who swears by it as a diesel conditioner in his Cummins. I don't know anybody who uses it in the crankcase. Now this is admittedly a small sample, but if it is representative of the typical uses of the product, then I'd argue that in the role(s) that the product is primarily used for (and marketed for) it is certainly successful at these things.

What I'm trying to say is that Seafoam is advertised to do a number of things, only one of which is as a crankcase additive. I have no doubt in my mind that Seafoam has a very long and well documented history (as you put it) of doing these things. I've used it myself for many of these purposes.

If the "typical" sample of people on this board who use it in the crankcase is as example of that demographic as a whole (yourself excluded) then they are already dealing with something on its last legs and there would never be any sort of pursuit of Seafoam for any kind of liability if their engine were to fail or get worse at that point in its life.

I could be completely wrong, but that's my take on it shrug

Quote:
Just not the case. There are more documented instances out there of an oil filter failing and taking an engine out than problems with Seafoam( in the crankcase ).

I think some of you are just tilting at windmills here.


I'm just concerned about the personal liability of condoning the use of a solvent in the crankcase in a broad brushed manner without mention of the caveats that go along with such an approach. I haven't been shy about making it clear that this isn't something I would ever do, but I'm not going to sit here and condemn you for doing it, as what you do with your car is your own business and I have no right to tell you otherwise.

What I will say is that as long as somebody is clear about the potential repercussions if something DOES go sideways, and that it shouldn't be done under warranty AND they have experience with the product used in this manner, then I will respect their position on the subject.

Otherwise, I will, as I have here, point to the manufacturer's stance on the use of such products in the crankcase, the potential effects on any powertrain warranty that may be in place and of course the risks of using a solvent in a place where only a lubricant is specified.

Hopefully you can see where I'm coming from here cheers
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#2800150 - 11/12/12 11:39 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: OVERKILL]
PZR2874 Offline


Registered: 05/06/11
Posts: 499
Loc: San Antonio, TX
Originally Posted By: OVERK1LL
Ford's stance:


BMW's stance:


If you'd like further examples, just take a look in your owners manual. This isn't some baseless posturing to cause you undue grief, it is the stance of the automotive manufacturers and can cause warranty issues for people still covered by their powertrain warranty.


I think the last part of that scan you have there made me LOL. So the BMW oil's you buy at the dealer don't have any additives in it?
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#2802306 - 11/14/12 11:37 AM Re: Seafoam [Re: hockeyfun1]
Cristobal Offline


Registered: 01/02/11
Posts: 2016
Loc: Montebello, CA
I placed about four ounces Seafoam in the crankcase of The Beast two days ago. I think this is fine if a person does not overdo it. My main concern is that Seafoam is very fluid, and will reduce oil viscosity. So do not use a lot at a time.
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