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eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ?

Posted By: Shannow

eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 05/31/18 08:45 AM

Posted By: Ducked

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 05/31/18 11:17 AM

I got a couple of tyre irons the last time I was back in the UK but can't do anything with them. Much too blunt. I had a Girling one a long time ago that was usable, but that guys (probably self-made) look much better. Wonder what he made them from. Look like spring steel but a bit thin for leaf springs.

The details of the vulcanising procedure are obscured by the tyre a bit. Here's one from Cambodia, though its only patching a tube.



Rather disappointingly, the patch looks to be made for the job rather than improvised. The heater appears to be a piston fitted with a handle.
Posted By: Kira

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 05/31/18 11:20 AM

Nifty video....served to underscore my appreciation for my place on this planet.

NOW for the TECH of it: Seems the "fire step" went on a little long.

I've installed patches on the inside and after roughening-up, some glue, lat the patch on and roll it hard....then light it up.
It'd burn for 5 seconds or so.

That guy was roasting marshmallows!
Posted By: Shannow

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 05/31/18 11:22 AM

I've got a couple of vulcanising patch tins around the place...a couple of clapms too...took them to work, and only two guys knew what they were.

I remember one weekend when I was around 7 or 8, when My Mum's Sister's husband tried to fix a flat (tubed) on his car (Datsun 240K), by the vulcanising patch...it was a debacle, as he refitted the tyre, he made more holes in the tube.

Smell of napalm in the morning is nothing compared to phosphorous.
Posted By: pandus13

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 05/31/18 12:54 PM

I like the safety shoes....
And Kira, spot on... our place...

and the lookie-loos at the end admiring the tech's work....

now one question: why a round boulder to hold the car? why not a square/rectangle/curbside piece one?
Posted By: andyd

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 05/31/18 01:11 PM

Being raised in a service station, tire repair was often observed. Irons were called spoons, much soap was used. On bicycles I learned quickly that screwdrivers made lousy tire irons.
Posted By: 4WD

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 05/31/18 01:18 PM

That’s all pro ~ I used to work in the Philippines … see something different every day …

Lots of natural beauty in the countryside and areas like Makati City were developed into very modern business and dining spreads while keeping some green belts …
Posted By: oil_film_movies

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 05/31/18 03:32 PM

Originally Posted By: Ducked
The details of the vulcanising procedure are obscured by the tyre a bit.
"Vulcanizing" is sulphur, heat, and raw rubber. This is just melting rubber to seal the hole, that's all. He damaged the halobutyl inner liner with that marshmallow-roast move.

I don't like his lug nut torquing pattern. Should be a star pattern to keep the rotors from warping. Where is his ASE Certification? Didn't see it hanging on the wall anywhere.
Posted By: Yah-Tah-Hey

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 05/31/18 04:47 PM

OSHA violation X ???.
Posted By: PimTac

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 05/31/18 04:59 PM

Reminds me of my childhood. One of the first repair jobs we learned was how to fix a flat on our bicycles. Always borrowed matches from the folks to light the patch to fuse the glue and rubber on the tubes.


Spent a bit of time in the Philippines. Vulcanizing shops are everywhere. Tires get repaired until they just cannot be saved. A lot of bald tires running on vehicles there.
Posted By: thrace

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 05/31/18 05:05 PM

Vehicle is Innova Diesel. Assembly likely in Santa Rosa, Philippines
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Innova
Posted By: nthach

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 05/31/18 11:07 PM

Originally Posted By: thrace
Vehicle is Innova Diesel. Assembly likely in Santa Rosa, Philippines
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Innova

Toyota developed the IMVs for the 3rd world, but you don't see them in Central America/South America/Mexico.

And it's also a D4-D common rail engine but unless you're in Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, Taiwan, South Korea and parts of China the diesel in Asia is dirtier than our ULSD or even the pre-2007 low-sulfur diesel.
Posted By: Ducked

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 05/31/18 11:45 PM

Originally Posted By: oil_film_movies
Originally Posted By: Ducked
The details of the vulcanising procedure are obscured by the tyre a bit.
"Vulcanizing" is sulphur, heat, and raw rubber. This is just melting rubber to seal the hole, that's all. He damaged the halobutyl inner liner with that marshmallow-roast move.


Yeh, should have been "Vulcanising".

Seems to be some some disagreement as to whether its just melting rubber. Several mentions above of lighting off glue, though I wouldn't have thought that'd enhance adhesion.

On bikes I just use contact adhesive and a bit of old inner tube.No heat but clamp between two coins in mole grips. On cars so far I've only used the tyre string kits, which are widely considered criminally irresponsible in the UK, especially by people who sell tyres. Maybe I/'ll try the BBQ technique.

Originally Posted By: oil_film_movies


I don't like his lug nut torquing pattern. Should be a star pattern to keep the rotors from warping. Where is his ASE Certification? Didn't see it hanging on the wall anywhere.


Looked over-tightened to me, so he's following the same standards as you get in the first world from a professional using air tools.
Posted By: Ducked

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 05/31/18 11:49 PM

Originally Posted By: PimTac
A lot of bald tires running on vehicles there.


Fair number here, but then its predictably dry for more than half the year, and they'll perform better then, so statistically you might be no worse off.
Posted By: Ducked

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 05/31/18 11:55 PM

Originally Posted By: pandus13
I like the safety shoes....
And Kira, spot on... our place...

and the lookie-loos at the end admiring the tech's work....

now one question: why a round boulder to hold the car? why not a square/rectangle/curbside piece one?


I'd describe it as a tapered section of tree trunk. Taper has obvious advantages in fitting. Squared off with a side=axe or adze would have been nicer but not so easily moved. Actually I was surprised he used anything, but perhaps his jack leaks.
Posted By: Shannow

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 06/01/18 07:35 AM

Originally Posted By: Ducked
Yeh, should have been "Vulcanising".

Seems to be some some disagreement as to whether its just melting rubber. Several mentions above of lighting off glue, though I wouldn't have thought that'd enhance adhesion.


Vulcanising is a process in which the rubber polymerises and cross links becoming more homogeneous gluing is gluing.

e.g.


Me personally, when I was asset managing the conveyors, I went with gluing (yes, it's contact cement)...the belts stretch in service, and I can cut out the glued splices and renew them as I shorten the belt.
Posted By: Shannow

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 06/01/18 08:02 AM

Just realised that he's wearing the same shoes for tyre repairs as I use when welding.
Posted By: Delta

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 06/01/18 11:22 AM

Originally Posted By: Shannow
Just realised that he's wearing the same shoes for tyre repairs as I use when welding.


Hahah, you know while it's a bad idea, it's not that bad of an idea. Ever get a hot spark down your work boots? Fastest I've ever removed my shoe, lol. laugh

EDIT: I've never seen a belt being put together like that. We just use metal lacing, although our belts didn't see as much abuse as that...
Posted By: Shannow

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 06/01/18 11:34 AM

Had a spark in the boot.
Had a spark drill through a sneaker.

Scariest I ever saw was down in a hydro (should be cold, but a big steel box in the sun), and the foreman was overhead welding with overalls, and only wearing (nylon) jocks (was 1989 after all)...slag fell, was slowed by his chest hairs, and then parked in the nylon underwear.

Re belts, ours see 13,000 Tonnes per day, 365 days a year. Some at 2500TPH.
Posted By: Silk

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 06/02/18 12:54 AM

Yeah, welding exhausts on cars, I've had MIG sparks travel all the way down in side my overalls into my boots. When I worked in the Ag shop we would get bailer belts changed by glueing, it's a huge amount of work to remove rollers to slip a new belt in.

We used to use a Stenor vulcaniser to patch tubes, and even repair sidewall cuts...back in the '70's. Never had one fail. I've got a roll of the patch rubber we used at home, nice thin rubber you can cut to any size, for a multitude of purposes.

Posted By: eljefino

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 06/02/18 12:57 AM

Nah, I'm not that bald... or tan.

Obligatory crack at it:

Posted By: spasm3

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 06/02/18 01:09 AM

Originally Posted By: eljefino
Nah, I'm not that bald... or tan.

Obligatory crack at it:



Some people run air in their tires, some run nitrogen. eljefino runs a carbon monoxide fill!
Posted By: tbm3fan

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 06/02/18 01:10 AM

Love the background noise in the video. Yep, that is the Philippines nothing but constant noise. Between 1988-2008 I made 53 trips over there and ended up getting married to a Filipina, in 2003, who grew up way out in a province. These types of gonzo repairs happen all day long. Given that most traffic rarely moves at more than 25 mph, except on the few expressways, this repair won't be a problem. Now if you saw them do electrical that would really make your hair stand on the back of your neck.
Posted By: supton

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 06/02/18 12:30 PM

Originally Posted By: eljefino
Nah, I'm not that bald... or tan.

Obligatory crack at it:



I like how you made sure to wear HF nitrile gloves. 'cuz that'll be worth something while playing with fire.

Heh, good vid. Did you leave the valve core in?
Posted By: eljefino

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 06/02/18 01:47 PM

Originally Posted By: supton

Heh, good vid. Did you leave the valve core in?


Yes and that was my downfall. The fire consumed all the oxygen so when the gases cooled down the tire puckered up. Luckily the beads stayed seated.

What's funny is I'm sure the ether burned off in a second or so, so it was probably the oils on the tire surface that kept going for those long few extra seconds.
Posted By: DAC2018

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 06/03/18 11:04 AM

i wonder how long it will last
Posted By: pandus13

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 06/06/18 02:07 PM

Originally Posted By: supton
Originally Posted By: eljefino
Nah, I'm not that bald... or tan.

Obligatory crack at it:



I like how you made sure to wear HF nitrile gloves. 'cuz that'll be worth something while playing with fire.

Heh, good vid. Did you leave the valve core in?

HEY, safety first.

He removed the bottle from next to the tire.
Also he jumped pretty dexterously when the fire puffed ...

Also I thought the video is 2-3 years old?

P.S. off topic:
My FIL tried like that the propane tanks connections all his life.
It worked until a defective valve...
After 15 years he still has the scars on his hands....
Posted By: JTK

Re: eljefino - is that you in the Phillipines ? - 06/06/18 02:26 PM

I guess a Hunter road force balance is out of the question..
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