Recent Topics
How To Remove Overspray On Aluminum Wheels?
by NDL - 07/02/20 07:16 AM
Gas Buddy Card to pay?
by Redright9 - 07/02/20 04:35 AM
Pentosin Mania
by Snagglefoot - 07/01/20 11:30 PM
Spills. Synthetic vs petrolium
by Chris142 - 07/01/20 10:35 PM
Michelin Pilot Sport All-Season 4
by FordFocus - 07/01/20 10:04 PM
NGK Ruthenium Spark Plugs
by Deontologist - 07/01/20 07:49 PM
Ram Truck Speaker Upgrade Questions
by edhackett - 07/01/20 07:41 PM
OLM SCREWED UP
by demarpaint - 07/01/20 06:12 PM
Have Valvoline European 5w-40. Use in Cummins?
by RetiredGuyOR - 07/01/20 06:06 PM
Change in evaporation rate over time?
by mosschops - 07/01/20 05:56 PM
17 Golf overzealous OLM/Minder
by lawrencerd - 07/01/20 04:24 PM
First cell phone
by Chris142 - 07/01/20 04:08 PM
Motorcraft FL836 Specifications
by viscous - 07/01/20 03:41 PM
Chipmunks - Damit.
by PontiacHO - 07/01/20 03:37 PM
27/18k portable genset oil.
by 1978elcamino - 07/01/20 03:31 PM
Saw a new BMW and had to do a double take.
by wemay - 07/01/20 02:55 PM
Newest Members
bigmike323, SolsticeSHO, Bazza32, Klink_II, williamshrader
71828 Registered Users
Who's Online Now
88 registered members (555, ARCOgraphite, 2K2AcuraTL, 2015_PSD, 1978elcamino, 64bawagon, 6 invisible), 1,291 guests, and 22 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Statistics
Forums67
Topics307,317
Posts5,308,856
Members71,828
Most Online4,538
Jan 20th, 2020
Donate to BITOG
Print Thread
Hop To
Page 1 of 2 1 2
What is a VPN? A BITOG Guide #5437018 05/23/20 08:45 PM
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 42,416
O
OVERKILL Online Content OP
OP Online Content
O
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 42,416
Seems the topic of VPN's has become quite common as of late and there appears to be a significant amount of confusion regarding just what exactly a VPN is and what it can and cannot do. I've written this thread to hopefully provide a layman-geared breakdown of the topic. If there is something you don't feel is sufficiently simplified/comprehensible then please let me know and I will attempt greater clarification.

VPN is an acronym that simply stands for Virtual Private Network. As the name implies, the nature of this private network is logical; it is a construct, not a physically private network, such as your home LAN. At its most basic, a VPN is simply an encrypted tunnel between two or more points where all traffic inside that link is concealed during traversal.

Historically, the purpose of a VPN was to provide remote access for employees to work resources; allow the user's device(s) to securely tunnel into the company LAN and access resources located therein. These resources could be accessed via a Remote Desktop connection, using Citrix, or some other medium or even directly from the remote workstation in smaller deployments when what was being accessed consisted of simple print queues and SMB shares.

VPN connections come in two flavours: Hardware and Software.

Hardware: A physical appliance is deployed at the remote location to provide access to the resources. This is available all the time with no intervention required by the user. This is most common for branch offices but teleworker gateways are also a thing and reasonably popular. This device establishes the tunnel itself and maintains it. Traffic is directed across the tunnel per whatever policy is defined which could be a split-tunnel or full-tunnel setup.

Software: An integrated client or software package is used to create and maintain the tunnel. This may require user intervention (and typically does in most configurations) where the tunnel is only established when the user needs to access the remote resources. There have been myriad proprietary and standards-based commercial packages available over the years, many vendor-specific like Cisco's IPSec VPN client, Juniper's Pulse Secure, OpenVPN, Cisco's AnyConnect SSL client...etc. Most OS's offer core support for standards-based VPN setups like L2TP for example. These software solutions also offer full or split-tunnel capabilities. Browser-based solutions are now also available which function in a similar manner, where all browser traffic is funnelled over an encrypted link to a remote network.

While most hardware VPN's terminate on a corresponding piece of equipment on the other end of the link like say a Cisco ASA or ISR, Juniper SSG...etc, software clients can terminate on those devices, or, on a software solution running on a server like an OpenVPN install for example. The server software decrypts the traffic and forwards it on through its link(s), be it LAN or WAN destined.

Back when bandwidth was expensive, VPN's were very commonly of the split-tunnel variety where only traffic destined to/from the remote LAN was transmitted over the encrypted link. This was done by nature of a routing entry or entries where only those specific subnets were assigned routes that pushed through the adapter interface IP assigned to the VPN. As bandwidth became cheaper, admins were more inclined, particularly if they were using software clients, toward full-tunnel setups so that all traffic to/from the remote client had to pass through the corporate firewall for inspection. This allowed the detection and filtering of malware, inappropriate websites, viruses...etc. These tasks could be offloaded to teleworker gateways and remote firewalls in a hardware deployment however.

More recently, VPN's have gained popularity for concealing traffic from ISP's (Internet Service Providers) because people fear being penalized or having their browsing habits monetized. The main benefits of using a VPN outside of accessing work resources are:
- To facilitate location spoofing for services that filter content based on location, like Netflix
- To protect traffic when using public WiFi at Starbucks or a hotel
- For less-than-legal activities like torrenting where one may come under fire from the RIAA or one of the movie companies for illegal procurement of content.

While Paramount might have luck contacting your ISP and indicating that a specific IP in their block on April 5th was downloading one of their titles from the Pirate Bay, they are going to have much less of a chance of success getting cooperation from a VPN provider headquartered in the Netherlands and terminating your connection in Nigeria.

Because a VPN only encrypts the traffic traversing the link, it does not provide end-to-end security, unless the resource you are accessing is the VPN provider. This means that already encrypted content like banking transactions for example, aren't further bolstered in security and it also means that any plain-text data being transmitted still crosses multiple hops in its plain-text state once it exits the VPN. This could actually mean more, less secure hops than if the traffic didn't have its egress point relocated, depending on where the tunnels lands.

Say for example you were posting on BITOG pre-SSL days, so all traffic is unencrypted. We'll pretend the server is located in Washington at a Datacentre that put it squarely on the AT&T backbone.

Scenario 1, no VPN: Traffic goes from your computer, through your ISP to the AT&T network, total carrier count is 2, hop count is 7.
Scenario 2, with VPN: Traffic goes encrypted to Romania where it exits the VPN. It then gets routed through Skynet then onto a provider out of Munich, through London where it gets onto Vodaphone which routes it across the pond to AT&T. Total carrier count is 5, hop count 40.

At any point post de-encapsulation that plain text content is sniffable as it traverses those 40 hops.

So already encrypted traffic doesn't benefit. Plain text traffic doesn't benefit unless you count DNS queries, which could be resolved at the VPN termination point, or forwarded on to a server operated by their provider, depending on the topology. This prevents your ISP from seeing the sites you are going to, but it doesn't prevent the VPN provider from seeing them or your DNS queries unless you are using a DNSCrypt mechanism inside the VPN and tunnelling those queries to a separate entity, which you could also just do without the VPN. In any case, the VPN provider sees the same level of detail your ISP would without the VPN, as does their provider.


2019 RAM 1500 Sport - Mobil 1 EP 0w-20, FRAM Ultra
2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT Ravenol SSL 0w-40, FRAM Ultra
Re: What is a VPN? A BITOG Guide [Re: OVERKILL] #5437084 05/23/20 10:25 PM
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,808
S
slacktide_bitog Offline
Offline
S
Joined: Mar 2008
Posts: 9,808
Thank you for posting thumbsup

Re: What is a VPN? A BITOG Guide [Re: OVERKILL] #5437093 05/23/20 10:39 PM
Joined: Dec 2016
Posts: 135
F
frankbee3 Online Content
Online Content
F
Joined: Dec 2016
Posts: 135
Overkill,

Thank you for taking the time to post this information!

I have been intermittently been trying to get a better understanding of VPN’s, how they work and most importantly, whether I can actually be more private and secure on the www?

I have had the desire to at least frustrate the efforts of entities that would monetize my data or snoop into my activities online.

You write up is the most understandable and English language like that I read thus far.

Do you think subscribing to a provider like ExpressVPN or such would be of any benefit?

I am reluctant to use public WiFi and just use my mobile data provider when away from home and avoid consuming video content while using mobile data services.

I try to avoid going to sketchy websites, clicking on links etc. I try to practice good hygiene when going online.

Do you have any recommendations for reading about how to be most private and secure online?

Thanks again for posting your write up.


1992 Toyota Pickup
2001 Mazda Miata
2003 Dodge Ram 2500 Cummins
2008 Subaru Outback
Miscellaneous Yard tractors and lawn mowers
Re: What is a VPN? A BITOG Guide [Re: OVERKILL] #5437121 05/23/20 11:39 PM
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 2,126
R
redhat Offline
Offline
R
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 2,126
Great write up. I used to be at a SNF chain where Site to Site VPNs and T1 MPLS circuits were everywhere. Even had one point where MPLS and backup Cable ISP went down, had a Verizon 3G PCMCIA/CardBus AirCard on a Windows XP laptop using Internet Connection Sharing into the WAN on a SonicWall with Aggressive Mode negotiation mode on and got a whole building running on 3G... man the memories.

Thankfully now, my entire campus is Fiber between buildings, Fiber ISP and Cable Backup WAN and my extent of VPN is using the NetExtender client when I want to remote it. Thank god.


20 Accord 2.0T - HGMO 0W-20, PLM A02, 2k
19 F150 2.7 - MCSB 5W-30, FL2062, 18k
84 JD 316 Repowered w/Vanguard 18
Re: What is a VPN? A BITOG Guide [Re: redhat] #5437152 05/24/20 01:24 AM
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 42,416
O
OVERKILL Online Content OP
OP Online Content
O
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 42,416
Originally Posted by redhat
Great write up. I used to be at a SNF chain where Site to Site VPNs and T1 MPLS circuits were everywhere. Even had one point where MPLS and backup Cable ISP went down, had a Verizon 3G PCMCIA/CardBus AirCard on a Windows XP laptop using Internet Connection Sharing into the WAN on a SonicWall with Aggressive Mode negotiation mode on and got a whole building running on 3G... man the memories.

Thankfully now, my entire campus is Fiber between buildings, Fiber ISP and Cable Backup WAN and my extent of VPN is using the NetExtender client when I want to remote it. Thank god.


That's hilarious! I've had to jimmy rig similar, including a link using 56K LOL So I feel your pain.

Cisco AnyConnect is my current go-to for access to most resources. Using SSL, it works anywhere, hence the name, which makes it an excellent option.


2019 RAM 1500 Sport - Mobil 1 EP 0w-20, FRAM Ultra
2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT Ravenol SSL 0w-40, FRAM Ultra
Re: What is a VPN? A BITOG Guide [Re: frankbee3] #5437153 05/24/20 01:29 AM
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 42,416
O
OVERKILL Online Content OP
OP Online Content
O
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 42,416
Originally Posted by frankbee3
Overkill,

Thank you for taking the time to post this information!

I have been intermittently been trying to get a better understanding of VPN’s, how they work and most importantly, whether I can actually be more private and secure on the www?

I have had the desire to at least frustrate the efforts of entities that would monetize my data or snoop into my activities online.

You write up is the most understandable and English language like that I read thus far.

Do you think subscribing to a provider like ExpressVPN or such would be of any benefit?

I am reluctant to use public WiFi and just use my mobile data provider when away from home and avoid consuming video content while using mobile data services.

I try to avoid going to sketchy websites, clicking on links etc. I try to practice good hygiene when going online.

Do you have any recommendations for reading about how to be most private and secure online?

Thanks again for posting your write up.



You are quite welcome!

Most stuff you can do is pretty easy. If you aren't trying to hide your traffic from your ISP, then a VPN for you doesn't make sense. I'd suggest using OpenDNS or similar as your DNS provider (it gives you some traffic filtering options, which are excellent, and blocks a lot of malware and similar) as well as browser with Adblock Plus or UBlock. Alternatively, you could use Brave, which has a built in blocker. Don't use google for searching, use duckduckgo, and that should keep you reasonably private.


2019 RAM 1500 Sport - Mobil 1 EP 0w-20, FRAM Ultra
2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT Ravenol SSL 0w-40, FRAM Ultra
Re: What is a VPN? A BITOG Guide [Re: OVERKILL] #5437235 05/24/20 07:00 AM
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 3,464
E
edwardh1 Offline
Offline
E
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 3,464
good post. see my signature below , tho does not apply to you

Examples -Poor computer geek instructions: --- if they are so smart why cant they explain better???
1. your token has expired
2. step 1- launch your desktop client
3. software agreement includes Boot rom code
4. ecg watch app is now available in saudi arabia

Last edited by edwardh1; 05/24/20 07:02 AM.

These products are all new every year?? They are a revolution!!! Razor blades, mens shirts, TVs, wiper blades, gutter guards, hearing aids... according to the ads. But also all new last year
Re: What is a VPN? A BITOG Guide [Re: OVERKILL] #5437526 05/24/20 02:26 PM
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 23,931
Z
ZeeOSix Offline
Offline
Z
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 23,931
Nice write-up OVERKILL ... thanks for the info, and thanks to others that contribute to this thread.

One thing that I'm not clear on is how does regular https:// and VPN differ in terms of the possible "packet sniffing" security of the data in the WiFi signal between the computer and modem/router when:

1) Using a https:// website on a secure WiFi network - with VPN vs without a VPN.

2) Using a non https:// website on a secure WiFi network - with VPN vs without a VPN.

Re: What is a VPN? A BITOG Guide [Re: ZeeOSix] #5437599 05/24/20 03:38 PM
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 42,416
O
OVERKILL Online Content OP
OP Online Content
O
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 42,416
Originally Posted by ZeeOSix
Nice write-up OVERKILL ... thanks for the info, and thanks to others that contribute to this thread.

One thing that I'm not clear on is how does regular https:// and VPN differ in terms of the possible "packet sniffing" security of the data in the WiFi signal between the computer and modem/router when:

1) Using a https:// website on a secure WiFi network - with VPN vs without a VPN.

2) Using a non https:// website on a secure WiFi network - with VPN vs without a VPN.


Simply put, HTTPS is end-to-end encryption, that is, all traffic between your computer and that remote site are encrypted. What doesn't take place inside that is name resolution and thus the initial "handshake" establishing with the site.

Whether a network is secured or not doesn't change the ability to capture unencrypted traffic once a client has been authenticated. The encryption is between the client and the network to prevent the traffic from being sniffed from devices not participating on/authenticated with the network. Once a device is securely authenticated and allowed to participate, while the communication with the network is protected, traffic inside that network is not.

Client isolation is a feature that blocks wireless clients from seeing each other. Some access point/WLAN setups also have the ability to prevent wireless clients from talking to LAN clients as well, essentially silo'ing them. But a person cannot depend on client isolation, and what degree of it, being in play when on a network they don't own, this is where a VPN becomes useful, as it means that ALL interesting traffic (assuming a full-tunnel not split tunnel setup) is encrypted before leaving the client device and only returns to its native state once it exits that tunnel. This also prevents against DNS injection hijacks, redirects and the like, because all name resolution happens through the tunnel, typically via a DNS provider you trust (in my case CIRA or OpenDNS).


2019 RAM 1500 Sport - Mobil 1 EP 0w-20, FRAM Ultra
2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT Ravenol SSL 0w-40, FRAM Ultra
Re: What is a VPN? A BITOG Guide [Re: OVERKILL] #5442047 05/29/20 06:52 PM
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 23,931
Z
ZeeOSix Offline
Offline
Z
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 23,931
I didn't want to start a new thread for my following comment, but got this message in Firefox 76.0 which is security related, so I'll just post it here. Any comments?

[Linked Image]

Re: What is a VPN? A BITOG Guide [Re: OVERKILL] #5442310 05/30/20 08:01 AM
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 4,105
A
alarmguy Offline
Offline
A
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 4,105
Originally Posted by OVERKILL
Originally Posted by frankbee3
Overkill,

Thank you for taking the time to post this information!

I have been intermittently been trying to get a better understanding of VPN’s, how they work and most importantly, whether I can actually be more private and secure on the www?

I have had the desire to at least frustrate the efforts of entities that would monetize my data or snoop into my activities online.

You write up is the most understandable and English language like that I read thus far.

Do you think subscribing to a provider like ExpressVPN or such would be of any benefit?

I am reluctant to use public WiFi and just use my mobile data provider when away from home and avoid consuming video content while using mobile data services.

I try to avoid going to sketchy websites, clicking on links etc. I try to practice good hygiene when going online.

Do you have any recommendations for reading about how to be most private and secure online?

Thanks again for posting your write up.



You are quite welcome!

Most stuff you can do is pretty easy. If you aren't trying to hide your traffic from your ISP, then a VPN for you doesn't make sense. I'd suggest using OpenDNS or similar as your DNS provider (it gives you some traffic filtering options, which are excellent, and blocks a lot of malware and similar) as well as browser with Adblock Plus or UBlock. Alternatively, you could use Brave, which has a built in blocker. Don't use google for searching, use duckduckgo, and that should keep you reasonably private.


First a compliment to you as your explanation is first class. The only thing I disagree with in your posts are for my intended purposes which are some of yours as well.
For me, I do use duckduckgo ALL the time. I also have turned off googles "location services" in any or every family members android device when possible.

Since you mention duckduckgo all the time, I feel (and maybe I am dead wrong) you are discounting VPNs as another source of privacy. I feel this maybe doing a disservice to some in here.
More or less, you state that "If you aren't trying to hide your traffic from your ISP, then a VPN for you doesn't make sense."
Well, if you are one who wants privacy and one who does not want your information sold all over the internet or advertisers knowing your every want and desire, a VPN makes perfect sense. using duckduckgo denies google/advertisers from knowing your desires and purchases but your ISP is just as bad selling your information to advertisers. So why one and not the other, as again, the ISP is just as bad as google.

Correct? This is my understanding. Your internet provider is one of the largest collectors of personal information, as much if not more then google. Using a VPN denies them this. It also denies less scrupulous sites and or people your location.

Last edited by alarmguy; 05/30/20 08:26 AM.

14 Road King (current)
08 VStar 1300 Tourer
07 Suzuki C50
Re: What is a VPN? A BITOG Guide [Re: alarmguy] #5442376 05/30/20 09:34 AM
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 42,416
O
OVERKILL Online Content OP
OP Online Content
O
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 42,416
Originally Posted by alarmguy
Correct? This is my understanding. Your internet provider is one of the largest collectors of personal information, as much if not more then google. Using a VPN denies them this. It also denies less scrupulous sites and or people your location.


It's going to depend entirely on your ISP as to if they collect ANY data on you at all for the purposes of monetization, which is far more of a PITA when you don't have access to the ability to control advertising content like ads provided through the browser. My ISP doesn't participate in it at all, and neither does Rogers. In fact, I'd be surprised if there was a Canadian ISP that did.

For ads to be targeted the ISP would have to provide traffic profiles, most likely based on DNS queries, that's the easiest, tied to a given IP, which then an advertising partner would target on their end. This is far more complicated than how Google does it or Microsoft. If it uses DNS, this could be wholly mitigated by simply using OpenDNS for example.

ISP's aren't going to sniff socket traffic for the purposes of determining sites visited because of the performance impact it would have and the obscene amount of data generated that would have to be parsed in that process. That's why I'd expect that if it IS taking place, they are using DNS.

Regarding location, that's just a guess based on where a specific subnet is geographically homed, they aren't determining your street address. Knowing somebody is in Toronto or New York doesn't have any privacy implications, but does allow for a targeted ad to tell you that "singles available in your area! Click here to see all singles in Toronto".


2019 RAM 1500 Sport - Mobil 1 EP 0w-20, FRAM Ultra
2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT Ravenol SSL 0w-40, FRAM Ultra
Re: What is a VPN? A BITOG Guide [Re: ZeeOSix] #5442383 05/30/20 09:49 AM
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 42,416
O
OVERKILL Online Content OP
OP Online Content
O
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 42,416
Originally Posted by ZeeOSix
I didn't want to start a new thread for my following comment, but got this message in Firefox 76.0 which is security related, so I'll just post it here. Any comments?

[Linked Image]


Yes, they've started operating what is essentially a DNS proxy that sends queries to CloudFlare for resolution:
https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/firefox-dns-over-https

This is one of the advantages I noted a VPN could provide when using public WiFi but when using a VPN, ALL traffic that's clear text is encrypted through to the VPN provider, where in this case it's only DNS queries made through Firefox that receives that treatment. So if you open your e-mail client, have steam running...etc those queries still occur through the servers obtained by your adapter through whomever the connection is provided unless overridden, but then they are still plain text.

That said, this service has the advantage of the DNS queries being encrypted end-to-end, so they'd never be in clear text, unlike a VPN that uses servers that are located outside of their service.

One potential disadvantage could be the limiting of the ability for AV software to intercept, and block, traffic from malicious sites, depending on how the service is configured. Something to keep in mind.

I expect we are going to see a serious push towards DNS being encrypted going forward, as more and more traffic is end-to-end encrypted.

Last edited by OVERKILL; 05/30/20 09:50 AM.

2019 RAM 1500 Sport - Mobil 1 EP 0w-20, FRAM Ultra
2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT Ravenol SSL 0w-40, FRAM Ultra
Re: What is a VPN? A BITOG Guide [Re: OVERKILL] #5442925 05/31/20 07:11 AM
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 4,105
A
alarmguy Offline
Offline
A
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 4,105
Originally Posted by OVERKILL
Originally Posted by alarmguy
Correct? This is my understanding. Your internet provider is one of the largest collectors of personal information, as much if not more then google. Using a VPN denies them this. It also denies less scrupulous sites and or people your location.


It's going to depend entirely on your ISP as to if they collect ANY data on you at all for the purposes of monetization, which is far more of a PITA when you don't have access to the ability to control advertising content like ads provided through the browser. My ISP doesn't participate in it at all, and neither does Rogers. In fact, I'd be surprised if there was a Canadian ISP that did.

For ads to be targeted the ISP would have to provide traffic profiles, most likely based on DNS queries, that's the easiest, tied to a given IP, which then an advertising partner would target on their end. This is far more complicated than how Google does it or Microsoft. If it uses DNS, this could be wholly mitigated by simply using OpenDNS for example.

ISP's aren't going to sniff socket traffic for the purposes of determining sites visited because of the performance impact it would have and the obscene amount of data generated that would have to be parsed in that process. That's why I'd expect that if it IS taking place, they are using DNS.

Regarding location, that's just a guess based on where a specific subnet is geographically homed, they aren't determining your street address. Knowing somebody is in Toronto or New York doesn't have any privacy implications, but does allow for a targeted ad to tell you that "singles available in your area! Click here to see all singles in Toronto".


I dont disagree with you, except here in the USA I am almost positive data from ISPs is shared.
and ..
also there is certainly nothing at all wrong with using a VPN as an additional tool for security and privacy. I mean we can all lay down our bodies to be over run by companies building physiological profiles on us to sell to companies so they can sell us goods or we can do everything reasonable to limit it.
I take all the reasonable steps.

Its early Sunday morning and on my first cup of coffee with a thought I never thought about before until you posted this.
If someone picks up my SSID on the street do they or can they know my IP address?

Last edited by alarmguy; 05/31/20 07:15 AM.

14 Road King (current)
08 VStar 1300 Tourer
07 Suzuki C50
Re: What is a VPN? A BITOG Guide [Re: alarmguy] #5443028 05/31/20 09:13 AM
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 42,416
O
OVERKILL Online Content OP
OP Online Content
O
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 42,416
Originally Posted by alarmguy
Its early Sunday morning and on my first cup of coffee with a thought I never thought about before until you posted this.
If someone picks up my SSID on the street do they or can they know my IP address?


Nope, you are all good on that front.


2019 RAM 1500 Sport - Mobil 1 EP 0w-20, FRAM Ultra
2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT Ravenol SSL 0w-40, FRAM Ultra
Page 1 of 2 1 2
Previous Thread
Index
Next Thread

BOB IS THE OIL GUY® Powered by UBB.threads™