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Re: Frequent regens after switching to conventional [Re: Provi] #5177021 08/01/19 08:43 PM
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Garak Offline
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He's using the appropriate class of oil for a Duramax.


Plain, simple Garak.

2008 Infiniti G37 - Shell ROTELLA T6 Multi-Vehicle 5w-30, Wix 57356
1984 F-150 4.9L - Quaker State GB 10w-30, Wix 51515
Re: Frequent regens after switching to conventional [Re: edyvw] #5177504 08/02/19 11:48 AM
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loneryder Offline
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Originally Posted by edyvw
Originally Posted by Jimmy_Russells
The train on deletes is coming to a screeching halt. You can only take off federally mandated emissions devices for so long, a bunch of tuners have been fined already.


State Patrol in CO is seriously going after delete vehicles.

How can you tell? You talking about the black smoke trucks? No sympathy for them.

Re: Frequent regens after switching to conventional [Re: racin4ds] #5177590 08/02/19 01:58 PM
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dustyroads Offline
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Originally Posted by racin4ds
You poor guys and all this Regen/DEF BS... thats why I will not buy a new diesel and if I did it would be deleted same day! Too much headache and hassle!

Not necessarily a hassle. My 2012 Volvo truck did require a new DEF doser valve at around 400k miles. It was a very quick diagnosis and fix and while I couldn't tell you the exact cost at the moment, it wasn't anything jaw dropping.

My '16 Cascadia (Detroit DD13 engine) is nearing 450k miles and trouble free so far. Of course there is the expense of getting the DPF cleaned, but I had that done while doing a bunch of other maintenance so it wasn't an extra delay. Maybe I just jinxed myself, but so far...so good. smile


2013 F150 XLT 5.0 4X4 122k miles
Re: Frequent regens after switching to conventional [Re: dustyroads] #5177782 08/02/19 07:00 PM
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2015_PSD Offline
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Originally Posted by dustyroads
Originally Posted by racin4ds
You poor guys and all this Regen/DEF BS... thats why I will not buy a new diesel and if I did it would be deleted same day! Too much headache and hassle!
Not necessarily a hassle. My 2012 Volvo truck did require a new DEF doser valve at around 400k miles. It was a very quick diagnosis and fix and while I couldn't tell you the exact cost at the moment, it wasn't anything jaw dropping. My '16 Cascadia (Detroit DD13 engine) is nearing 450k miles and trouble free so far. Of course there is the expense of getting the DPF cleaned, but I had that done while doing a bunch of other maintenance so it wasn't an extra delay. Maybe I just jinxed myself, but so far...so good. smile
In all fairness, OTR trucks have very mature and robust DEF/SCR/DPF systems and have good success with them for hundreds of thousands of miles. The same cannot be said for their light truck equivalents and there are plenty of tales about the problems they have--form every manufacturer along with the $$$ that inevitably go along with it.

With that said, having to contend with whatever issues arise with those systems are part of what one has signed on to when purchasing a post-2007 light diesel and it is irresponsible to "gut" or bypass the emissions systems. I never had any visual or olfactory indications that my 2015 Powerstoke was a diesel, in fact, one had to listen closely to detect it was and from that perspective, it was quite enjoyable. The "knowing I will eventually have a major repair bill" department was not something I relished looking forward to, so I sold it when I sold my fifth wheel. YMMV!


2019 o)|||||(o Rubicon Wrangler Unlimited 3.6L V6 [Castrol Edge + Mahle]
2018 Mercedes Benz C300 2.0L Turbo [Pennzoil Platinum + Mann filter]
Re: Frequent regens after switching to conventional [Re: loneryder] #5177832 08/02/19 08:17 PM
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Jimmy_Russells Offline
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Originally Posted by loneryder
Originally Posted by edyvw
Originally Posted by Jimmy_Russells
The train on deletes is coming to a screeching halt. You can only take off federally mandated emissions devices for so long, a bunch of tuners have been fined already.


State Patrol in CO is seriously going after delete vehicles.

How can you tell? You talking about the black smoke trucks? No sympathy for them.


Well aside from looking under the truck and not seeing a giant DPF under there you plug in a scan tool or emissions tool and scan for sensor readiness, which of course won’t work.

Deleting these trucks is the equivalent of littering, everywhere, constantly. It’s just lame. If people actually used the trucks as they should be used and didn’t use them to just go get milk 360 days per year the systems would work as intended and would be more reliable.

Re: Frequent regens after switching to conventional [Re: Jimmy_Russells] #5178246 08/03/19 01:50 PM
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Kamele0N Offline
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Originally Posted by Jimmy_Russells

If people actually used the trucks as they should be used and didn’t use them to just go get milk 360 days per year the systems would work as intended and would be more reliable.


This!!! Diesel users with DPF related problems are usually those who buy diesel car to "save" money/gasoline on their way to curch and back...

Diesel is a working horse....and you dont have to baby it when it reaches its working temperature...


2008 Toyota Yaris 1ND-TV 1.4 D4-D Tech9 5W30 C3 VW 504/507
1997 Toyota Landcruiser KZJ95 3.0 TD Elf Evolution NF900 5W40
Re: Frequent regens after switching to conventional [Re: Kamele0N] #5178280 08/03/19 02:53 PM
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loneryder Offline
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Originally Posted by Kamele0N
Originally Posted by Jimmy_Russells

If people actually used the trucks as they should be used and didn’t use them to just go get milk 360 days per year the systems would work as intended and would be more reliable.


This!!! Diesel users with DPF related problems are usually those who buy diesel car to "save" money/gasoline on their way to curch and back...

Diesel is a working horse....and you dont have to baby it when it reaches its working temperature...

Yes. post 07 MB diesels don't like city driving. They start sludging up and setting off sensors. People who drive in those conditions should regularly take them on the Interstates for a long hi-speed drive. Italian tuneups don't help these diesels. They like a long stretch at 2k rpms or above.

Re: Frequent regens after switching to conventional [Re: Jimmy_Russells] #5178283 08/03/19 02:56 PM
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loneryder Offline
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Originally Posted by Jimmy_Russells
Originally Posted by loneryder
Originally Posted by edyvw
Originally Posted by Jimmy_Russells
The train on deletes is coming to a screeching halt. You can only take off federally mandated emissions devices for so long, a bunch of tuners have been fined already.


State Patrol in CO is seriously going after delete vehicles.

How can you tell? You talking about the black smoke trucks? No sympathy for them.


Well aside from looking under the truck and not seeing a giant DPF under there you plug in a scan tool or emissions tool and scan for sensor readiness, which of course won’t work.

Deleting these trucks is the equivalent of littering, everywhere, constantly. It’s just lame. If people actually used the trucks as they should be used and didn’t use them to just go get milk 360 days per year the systems would work as intended and would be more reliable.

They usually gut the dpfs, but do troopers pull people over and hook a scanner up to their vehicles. I could see doing it if they were rolling coal.
As for me, I don't mind the dpf. It's the egr I would like to delete or block. The egr is what fouls up the oil so quickly. You can see it clearly on uoa's.

Re: Frequent regens after switching to conventional [Re: loneryder] #5178349 08/03/19 04:59 PM
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Kamele0N Offline
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Originally Posted by loneryder

Yes. post 07 MB diesels don't like city driving. They start sludging up and setting off sensors. People who drive in those conditions should regularly take them on the Interstates for a long hi-speed drive. Italian tuneups don't help these diesels. They like a long stretch at 2k rpms or above.


Italian tuneups dont work...because in 99.9% all car brands are set to purge their DPFs between 2-3k rpms in "light duty" conditions (conditions that replicates highway driving) ...plus some additional demands (engine must be on working temperature....tank must be at least half full....etc. Conditions differ from brand to brand a little )


2008 Toyota Yaris 1ND-TV 1.4 D4-D Tech9 5W30 C3 VW 504/507
1997 Toyota Landcruiser KZJ95 3.0 TD Elf Evolution NF900 5W40
Re: Frequent regens after switching to conventional [Re: Kamele0N] #5178553 08/04/19 01:53 AM
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chrisri Offline
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If used appropriately most DPFs will be good for the life of the car. I'm on original, fully functioning DPF on my 07 diesel with 220k km. Still good. Car is used in city and suburbs, as is my wife's car, but every 600-800km we take it on the longer trip for a weekend or something. DPF do the regen then and is all good for stop and go traffic for next cycle.


02 Nissan Terrano 2.7.TDi Total 5w40
06 FIAT Stilo MW 1.9 Multijet SHU 5w40
07 Opel Vectra SW 1.9 CDTI 150 Motul 5w40
Re: Frequent regens after switching to conventional [Re: chrisri] #5178630 08/04/19 07:02 AM
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wensteph Offline
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Originally Posted by chrisri
If used appropriately most DPFs will be good for the life of the car. I'm on original, fully functioning DPF on my 07 diesel with 220k km. Still good. Car is used in city and suburbs, as is my wife's car, but every 600-800km we take it on the longer trip for a weekend or something. DPF do the regen then and is all good for stop and go traffic for next cycle.


VW threw enough money at me for me to sell them back my 3.0L TDI. It had 173,000 miles and vagcom had DPF loading at something over 50%. There is a poster on the Duramax forum that does hauling with his '17 for a living and he's still on the original DPF at 225,000 miles. I asked the question and he didn't mention cleaning in is response.

Re: Frequent regens after switching to conventional [Re: wensteph] #5178688 08/04/19 08:26 AM
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Originally Posted by wensteph
Originally Posted by chrisri
If used appropriately most DPFs will be good for the life of the car. I'm on original, fully functioning DPF on my 07 diesel with 220k km. Still good. Car is used in city and suburbs, as is my wife's car, but every 600-800km we take it on the longer trip for a weekend or something. DPF do the regen then and is all good for stop and go traffic for next cycle.
VW threw enough money at me for me to sell them back my 3.0L TDI. It had 173,000 miles and vagcom had DPF loading at something over 50%. There is a poster on the Duramax forum that does hauling with his '17 for a living and he's still on the original DPF at 225,000 miles. I asked the question and he didn't mention cleaning in is response.
For light trucks (zero experience with passenger cars, though I question some of the information I see posted from time to time on BITOG--not questioning what you posted though), the use case is key. The part I have set in bold font is one of the primary reasons (if not THE reason) the DPF has had zero issues after 225K miles and I would opine he did not clean the DPF. When towing and/or working the engine, there are passive regens that happen and the overall soot creation is far less at a steady speed versus stop and go driving. Totally speaking from a Ford Pwoerstroke experience, if you use a PSD for constant stop and go driving, your MPG will be in the toilet, your oil will be diluted above 5%, and (eventually--likely sooner than later) your emissions systems will be a money pit. Overall recently traded in a Dodge diesel for the same situation I describe--constant regens. The OEMs seriously need to "find a better way".


2019 o)|||||(o Rubicon Wrangler Unlimited 3.6L V6 [Castrol Edge + Mahle]
2018 Mercedes Benz C300 2.0L Turbo [Pennzoil Platinum + Mann filter]
Re: Frequent regens after switching to conventional [Re: oakaro68] #5178847 08/04/19 12:47 PM
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Every brand of light or medium diesel trucks will have their own set of sunshine pumpers or pot bangers. I don't know if it was the latest version of the Duramax (L5P) or the prior, but GM went to a 9th injector for DPF regen which pretty much did away with a fuel dilution problem. I most certainly haven't read through every thread on the Duramax forums since '17, and while there are complaints of codes being thrown, ECMs, and injector failures, there really aren't many pure emission control issues on the boards. Sure, plenty of owners hate regen kills milage and don't like the idea of the engine being choked by "all that crap", but the newer systems seem to be working pretty reliably. At least that brand. wink

edit to add other than replacing a NOx sensor I didn't have an emission system problem with the TDI (2011). There were, however, no small number of DEF system issues posted online. Seems like VW hadn't figured out that part.

Last edited by wensteph; 08/04/19 12:56 PM.
Re: Frequent regens after switching to conventional [Re: 2015_PSD] #5178854 08/04/19 12:53 PM
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dustyroads Offline
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Originally Posted by 2015_PSD
Originally Posted by wensteph
Originally Posted by chrisri
If used appropriately most DPFs will be good for the life of the car. I'm on original, fully functioning DPF on my 07 diesel with 220k km. Still good. Car is used in city and suburbs, as is my wife's car, but every 600-800km we take it on the longer trip for a weekend or something. DPF do the regen then and is all good for stop and go traffic for next cycle.
VW threw enough money at me for me to sell them back my 3.0L TDI. It had 173,000 miles and vagcom had DPF loading at something over 50%. There is a poster on the Duramax forum that does hauling with his '17 for a living and he's still on the original DPF at 225,000 miles. I asked the question and he didn't mention cleaning in is response.
For light trucks (zero experience with passenger cars, though I question some of the information I see posted from time to time on BITOG--not questioning what you posted though), the use case is key. The part I have set in bold font is one of the primary reasons (if not THE reason) the DPF has had zero issues after 225K miles and I would opine he did not clean the DPF. When towing and/or working the engine, there are passive regens that happen and the overall soot creation is far less at a steady speed versus stop and go driving.

No doubt, much of the credit for my good luck with the emissions equipment on my Freightliner has to do with the duty cycle. Out of roughly 12k miles per month, only 400-600 miles are with an empty trailer. The rest of the time I'm zooming along at very close to 80k lbs and passive regeneration keeps the DPF "clean".

Long hours of idling require "active" regens where the engine will rev to 1200 rpm for 10 minutes. In hot summer weather, it will idle 8-9 hours before a 10 minute regen. In the coldest winter weather... maybe 2-3 hours of idling before a regen. All extended idling is done at 900 rpm.

I had my DPF cleaned at about 340k miles, about 9700 hours and having burned about 46k gallons of fuel. I believe the newer ones are capable of 500k miles before needing the DPF cleaned.


2013 F150 XLT 5.0 4X4 122k miles
Re: Frequent regens after switching to conventional [Re: oakaro68] #5180067 08/06/19 03:15 AM
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BlakeB Offline
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My 2017 L5P typically regens every 80-100 miles, the longest I’ve had it go between regens so far is 301 miles. I put a lot of hours on my truck and not so many miles, the DPF doesn’t like it.
My dad has a 2016 LML with 45k miles and 3,000 hours on it. He uses his truck the same way I do and so far he hasn’t had any emission system related problems. His truck does regen at about the same intervals that mine does.

I initiated a stationary service regen on my L5P a while back using my CTS2 and it held the truck at 2,500 RPM for 30-35 minutes. I think enabling a mobile regen is the way to go if you have a long trip planned. A mobile regen is completed as you drive just like when the truck does it on its own, but you get to choose when it starts.


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