Yak trax

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1,409
Location
Gone Fishing
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greetings: just checking to see what some of you folks may use for traction control out doors. I have been using these(linky below) for several years and they work great..of course you have to remove them when you come inside or they are slick and can cause a fall as well..... https://www.amazon.com/Yaktrax-Trac...1543423920601&ref_=sb_s_sparkle_slot so what are you using for out door traction control on your shoes?
 
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687
Location
Indiana
They're great on ice and slippery surfaces like packed snow. My experience with them has been for dog walking in those types of conditions (on pavement). On even the slickest ice I always felt sure-footed. On bare pavement they feel "shaky" for the lack of a better description. Mine have shown no signs of wear, nor have I had issues with them coming off. I bought them after talking to my UPS guy - his opinion was that they work but he didn't like them. I like them a lot, but have never worn them all day, or getting in or out of a vehicle. Don't wear them indoors as they'd likely damage floors.
 
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16,681
Location
NH
I think wife and kids have yak tracks, they seem to work ok. I found these in a local store, if not these then similar, and like them, but they are murder on wood surfaces as you might guess. But I really like them.
 
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1,409
Location
Gone Fishing
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Originally Posted by Touring5
They're great on ice and slippery surfaces like packed snow. My experience with them has been for dog walking in those types of conditions (on pavement). On even the slickest ice I always felt sure-footed. On bare pavement they feel "shaky" for the lack of a better description. Mine have shown no signs of wear, nor have I had issues with them coming off. I bought them after talking to my UPS guy - his opinion was that they work but he didn't like them. I like them a lot, but have never worn them all day, or getting in or out of a vehicle. Don't wear them indoors as they'd likely damage floors.
i have experienced the same on pavement and concrete, at that moment have to slow down....see next post
 
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8,088
Location
New England
I'm not a fan. I've noticed they give me a false sense of security. My thoughts: 1. They're even more slippery than just my boots on smooth or black ice 2. They tend to pack just as quickly with snow as my boot treads, so no benefit there 3. They provide increased grip when I'm walking on non-smooth ice (e.g., chopped, broken, re-frozen, etc. ice) and hard-packed snow. If you're wearing shoes with low traction, to begin with, I guess these might help, but the above might still be issues. Who wears shoes like that in wintry weather anyway???
 
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1,409
Location
Gone Fishing
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Originally Posted by supton
I think wife and kids have yak tracks, they seem to work ok. I found these in a local store, if not these then similar, and like them, but they are murder on wood surfaces as you might guess. But I really like them.
i am considering trying something like these too for the reason mentioned above, can't hurt to have 2 pairs as cheap as they are...
 
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1,409
Location
Gone Fishing
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Originally Posted by gathermewool
I'm not a fan. I've noticed they give me a false sense of security. My thoughts: 1. They're even more slippery than just my boots on smooth or black ice 2. They tend to pack just as quickly with snow as my boot treads, so no benefit there 3. They provide increased grip when I'm walking on non-smooth ice (e.g., chopped, broken, re-frozen, etc. ice) and hard-packed snow.
agree with some of this, this is why i think having an additional pair like supton's or something similar as i have seen some studded type too on amazon..
 

Pew

Messages
1,012
Location
Illinois
I have several depending on conditions: Salomon snow boots for snow Kathoola Nanospikes for some ice and little/no snow <- used with trail runners Kathoola K10 crampons for serious ice and hiking <- boots only Black Diamond snow shoes for deep snow <- boots only
 
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It's really icy right now so I am still wearing my Sorel's even though it's not very cold. They have a very soft compound that would wear out quickly on gravel but help somewhat on ice. These are totally common in this rural mountainous area.

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Messages
312
Location
Canadia
I use shoes similar to these for running in the winter: https://www.amazon.com/Icebug-Pytho...icebug+run&qid=1580146998&sr=8-8 I've gone through a few pairs now, and they have been great. The only time I've taken a fall was when I was a bit careless going down a steep hill with a hard, iced-over surface. On packed snow with even a little bit of give for the studs to bite into, they are phenomenal. The only downside is that you have studs under your feet until you take the shoes off, so they aren't the right choice if you plan to wear your footwear inside.
 
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4,914
Location
Columbus,Nebraska
I use Stabilicers I purchased from LL Bean around 2008. Used them multiple times last week when we had ice everywhere. I believe the design has changed and the new design looks like a significant improvement with more gripping cleats distributed around the the edges.
 
Messages
323
Location
Northern KY
I've hiked the Grand Canyon in December or January four times now. The the first 1/2 mile of the South Kaibab and the last mile or so of the Bright Angel trails were both frozen solid every time. I've used a couple of different traction aids and the ones I felt most secure with were made by a company called Yukon Charlie's. They have carbide spikes that sink into the ice and felt more secure than Yak Trax to me. There are places on the Bright Angel where a slip could potentially be fatal so I really appreciated the security of traction aids and a pair of trekking poles.
 
Messages
2,341
Location
Pennsylvania
Hunted pheasants in the winter for about 8 tears with my friend and his dog. Yak Trax were great in the snow, particularly if there was an ice glaze on the surface. Definitely a thumbs up from me!
 

4WD

Messages
13,517
Location
Texas
Originally Posted by supton
I think wife and kids have yak tracks, they seem to work ok. I found these in a local store, if not these then similar, and like them, but they are murder on wood surfaces as you might guess. But I really like them.
Yaks if it is fairly uneven in the field - and the heel studs around town (anti slip devices, Devisys)
 
Messages
8
Location
WI
Check out NEOS overshoes. As the name implies, they slip on over your shoes. Good lugs on the bottom for great traction in snow, and the stabilicer model have replaceable metal cleats for great traction on ice. They are waterproof and come in insulated models. Mine are the Voyager Stabilicer and are not insulated, but keeping the snow and water off of your boots and blocking the wind really help keep your feet warm when on a snowy job site all day. Much better than my waterproof insulated work boots alone. My fire dept gives us the Yak Trax and they do help, but can get packed with snow and ice and take a bit to put on bigger boots.
 
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