Wheel Bearing Grease for Max Effort Rolling Resistance Reduction

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The title is a mouthful, but says it all. I'm looking to maximize rolling resistance reduction on a drag car. Could a lower viscosity NLGI 1 be used since there's no street time? Lamb Performance sells a "ultra low friction" wheel bearing grease, but I can't seem to find any specs on it.

On top of the wheel grease, I'm also checking/correcting bump steer, ensuring the alignment is on point, running the tires at the max psi that traction/safety will allow, checking the rear end for binding, etc...
 
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Have you looked into those new fancy ceramic bearings, or the coated bearings that can run without lube at all? Not an expert but remember reading about them.
 
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I'll have to look into the Amsoil Dominator grease. I see that it's GC-LB. I'm also curious about the Lamb Performance Low Friction grease.

I've looked into ceramic bearings, but that's a little to rich for my wallet at the moment. I might go that route eventually.
 
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Respectfully, contrary to marketing claims, the little benefit gained from a miracle grease ( even if one existed) in the overall rolling resistance equation scenario in terms of a significant meaningful impact is so small, it would be almost immeasurable except by calculation.

Focusing only on the rotating shaft elements ( not tires, geometry, wind resistance, weight, contact footprint etc.), you could probably upsize the bearing once to reduce the moving ( not starting) COF but even then, if the geometry and clearance isn't right you wont see anything there either.
 
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Respectfully, contrary to marketing claims, the little benefit gained from a miracle grease ( even if one existed) in the overall rolling resistance equation scenario in terms of a significant meaningful impact is so small, it would be almost immeasurable except by calculation.

Focusing only on the rotating shaft elements ( not tires, geometry, wind resistance, weight, contact footprint etc.), you could probably upsize the bearing once to reduce the moving ( not starting) COF but even then, if the geometry and clearance isn't right you wont see anything there either.
I don't disagree with you. I've done everything else though. I have light wheels with skinny front tires (at 60 psi) and rear radial slicks at the highest pressure they'll still dead hook. The suspension is set up to react quick and settle quick so the front end stays down going down the track. The car is lowered as low as it can be without compromising suspension geometry and traction. I've removed the air dam for the radiator to reduce drag underneath. I've put in headlight covers to give a slick air profile from bumper to hood. Weight is rules enforced at taken to the limit. Tire alignment has no toe-in and corrected for any bumpsteer to ensure it tracks straight down the track. The brakes are optimized to reduce any drag. The driveshaft / pinion angle is adjusted on point. The engine, trans, and rear end all have low viscosity, highly friction modified (engine wise) fluids. I'm running crankcase evacuation to improve ring seal. Power steering and AC/HVAC deleted. Battery relocated for better weight distribution and transfer. Using Sunoco EXO2 fuel for the high oxygenation / power potential.

You name it, I've thought of it or tried it. The bearing grease is the next step. If it'll get .01 second quicker in the 1/4-mile, it's worth it. Do 20 things that get a .01 ET improvement, that knocks a couple tenths off which is substantial. Especially in a class where a margin of victory measured in thousandths and even ten-thousandths of a second isn't uncommon.
 
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I don't disagree with you. I've done everything else though.

You name it, I've thought of it or tried it. The bearing grease is the next step. If it'll get .01 second quicker in the 1/4-mile, it's worth it. Do 20 things that get a .01 ET improvement, that knocks a couple tenths off which is substantial. Especially in a class where a margin of victory measured in thousandths and even ten-thousandths of a second isn't uncommon.
I copy you Lima Charlie

If that's the case then you could try a Kluber 000 spindle grease ( might have to change seals to a tighter one) or convert to an oil

Not knowing the actual bearing sizes, vehicle load and all that- I believe it possible you may benefit in a 1/4 mile. (I would do some experimenting though). I would definitely replace/recharge after every run.
 
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There was rumor in bike racing(think Tour de France) that the wheels get oil for lube, if they use serviceable hubs from Shimano or Campagnolo. Now, the effort with 3rd party wheels like Zipp(SRAM), Mavic and Enve is to use ceramic ball bearings and fluoropolymer grease.

if this is for a drag car, I can see a semi-fluid grease like Chevron Delo Grease SF or Mobil Mobilith SHC 007 that’s used for bus and truck wheelends or Krytox grease being used. Honda was touting low-friction grease in the wheel bearings of the Accord and Odyssey as an measure to increase MPG. It’s probably some esoteric low-hysteresis/low viscosity Kyodo Yushi or Shell Japan grease made to Honda specs and supplied to NTN/Koyo.
 

JHZR2

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Drag racing is a brutal sport there is no making up the thousandth of a second on the next lap.
I wasn’t really aware that it was a “sport”. But it is brutal and you can’t get the time back.

I’m with Kestas on the seal drag. If there’s some, how would you get rid of it?

I think this is an interesting topic. I’m not sure that the actual improvements will be measurable compared to human error, but it’s worth a try I guess.

Will this sort of thing be considered for front and rear bearings?
 
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