Using a trim router for cutting sheetrock

Messages
774
Location
NJ
Thread starter
I have 2 routers, a larger corded router that needs two hands, and a smaller lighter Ryobi 18v hand held router. Can I use the latter for cutting holes in sheetrock? What bit? I will not buy a Roto-Zip or similar cut off tool.
 
Messages
14,888
Location
NE,Ohio
a 10$ drywall saw works pretty good, how many holes we talking about. I would be worried about blowing up your router with it sucking in the dust.. plus a huge mess. How about an oscillating multitool?
 
Messages
774
Location
NJ
Thread starter
Sheetrock dust is such a killer wet/dry vacuums have a special filter they want you to buy to save the motor. I have the smaller router it for smaller less powerful jobs, grab it and go. It was free with a Ryobi battery and charger purchase or vice versa. I don't need to use it. Just seems from the videos with spiral cut out tools you get really nice straight edges and it's fast.
 
Last edited:
Messages
3,651
Location
Worst Case, Ontario
Originally Posted by JLawrence08648
Sheetrock dust is such a killer wet/dry vacuums have a special filter they want you to buy to save the motor.
I've vacuumed probably hundreds of pounds of drywall dust with a Ridgid vacuum and the filter that comes with it. You needn't anything special to protect the motor. It is destructive like any fine abrasive dust, but that's what the vacuum is for.
Originally Posted by JLawrence08648
Just seems from the videos with spiral cut out tools you get really nice straight edges and it's fast.
Get a drywall square and a 19mm Olfa, or a 3 1/2" holesaw for potlights. Those and a drywall saw are all you need. Scoring with a straight edge will give you a straight edge. No need for any fancy tools.
 
Messages
1,618
Location
Flatlands of Indiana
If you are hanging a lot of drywall, then a roto-zip or similar makes sense. Fast and perfect cuts every time. I don't think they work well with the blue plastic boxes. I usually use the beige fiberglass boxes.
 
Messages
2,379
Location
pa
being a retired pro i like the shark saw, just gotta measure good! roto zip type tools can be faster but theres a learning curve + a lotta dust + of course a utility knife for fast cut-snap straight cuts. prolly some vids on that but it too like anything takes practice. of course a drywall screw gun is best for fastening in either metal suds we used on construction or "dead wood" typical in house work! i laugh at myself as i did my old hose with a typical wood saw + keyhole saw, it dot done but today i would be much faster + efficient after 30 yrs as a pro carpenter doing mostly drywall many did not want because is it was heavy, usually fire rated 5/8" 10 + 12 feet long + production was key for getting more jobs from various contractors!!
 
Last edited:
Top