Refuse Lorry 1972 UK

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That is not a "refuse lorry". That is a "bin lorry". Or "dustbin lorry". Almost nobody over here says "refuse", "trash" or "garbage" (although most would know what it means if used in context). We'd say "rubbish", which is thrown away in a "rubbish bin" or "dustbin". The operatives of the bin lorry are "bin men".
 
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Originally Posted by weasley
That is not a "refuse lorry". That is a "bin lorry". Or "dustbin lorry". Almost nobody over here says "refuse", "trash" or "garbage" (although most would know what it means if used in context). We'd say "rubbish", which is thrown away in a "rubbish bin" or "dustbin". The operatives of the bin lorry are "bin men".
Agreed. I also wonder if you're allowed to put anything other than paper in an American "Waste Paper Basket" ?? I know the bin under my desk in work is full of crisp packets, sandwich wrappers etc. LOL
 
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What a great place to visit. I couldn't get over how the languages are the same but completely different. Here it's "to go." There it's a "take away." And so on. Band-aids are "plasters." Fascinating place.
 
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The reporter mentions the word refuse but he confuses the compactor as a cutter. Oh well, off for some bangers and mash.
 
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Originally Posted by Linctex
Overhead crane?? Wow - that entire process has dozens of improvements possible. Does Britain still incinerate?
I thought the same thing, that overhead crane was an inefficient way to move the trash. Burning the trash to generate power could make sense though, particularly where landfill space is not available.
 
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Originally Posted by PimTac
The reporter mentions the word refuse but he confuses the compactor as a cutter. Oh well, off for some bangers and mash.
It's funny why they are called bangers. When they had rations, sausage makers would put large amounts of water in sausages to make weight. And these had a nasty habit of going "bang" when cooking in a skillet.
 
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Originally Posted by weasley
That is not a "refuse lorry". That is a "bin lorry". Or "dustbin lorry". Almost nobody over here says "refuse", "trash" or "garbage" (although most would know what it means if used in context). We'd say "rubbish", which is thrown away in a "rubbish bin" or "dustbin". The operatives of the bin lorry are "bin men".
Is that due to a change in terms since 1972? Curious if that is the cause.
Originally Posted by carviewsonic
Originally Posted by Linctex
Overhead crane?? Wow - that entire process has dozens of improvements possible. Does Britain still incinerate?
I thought the same thing, that overhead crane was an inefficient way to move the trash. Burning the trash to generate power could make sense though, particularly where landfill space is not available.
Same thing, going to guess it's changed since 1972. Come to think of it, I recall seeing overhead cranes in a number of older movies; but haven't seen any recently.
Originally Posted by Alfred_B
Originally Posted by PimTac
The reporter mentions the word refuse but he confuses the compactor as a cutter. Oh well, off for some bangers and mash.
It's funny why they are called bangers. When they had rations, sausage makers would put large amounts of water in sausages to make weight. And these had a nasty habit of going "bang" when cooking in a skillet.
Very interesting!
 

SR5

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Originally Posted by PimTac
Oh well, off for some bangers and mash.
I love bangers and mash, also bubble and squeak with a fried egg on top.
 
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Originally Posted by supton
Originally Posted by weasley
That is not a "refuse lorry". That is a "bin lorry". Or "dustbin lorry". Almost nobody over here says "refuse", "trash" or "garbage" (although most would know what it means if used in context). We'd say "rubbish", which is thrown away in a "rubbish bin" or "dustbin". The operatives of the bin lorry are "bin men".
Is that due to a change in terms since 1972? Curious if that is the cause.
In a way it is a sign of the times. You may note that the reporter is speaking a certain way - what's known as "received pronunciation" or "the Queen's English" (or to many people, simply "posh"). Back then this was typical of broadcasters, who spoke in a way not necessarily representative of the populus. "Refuse" is the sort of word someone from the higher echelons of society might use, as is demonstrated here. The sort of person who may have talked about the "refuse" being put out for collection would probably have had someone do it for them.
 
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