Propene, polymer with ethene use in motor oil

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This is from a mixed review moly engine oil additive I used. Only contents are oil, moly and this, however there may be "nonhazardous additions". Then again it would not be pronene with ethene if it had some buddies with it right? What would Propene, polymer with ethene be used for in an oil/additive scenario? Is it a solid? 3.2 Mixtures · Description: Mixture of substances listed below with nonhazardous additions. ..... CAS: 9010-79-1 EC number: 618-455-4 1-Propene, polymer with ethene 9-12%
 
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Was thinking along the lines of a ligand or a carrier substance(makes less sense), but then again I only just passed my high school chemistry(a while back) smile You can make tons of things from Propene, polymer with ethene , but all my engine oil explanations require additional chemicals/reactions... thus the question.
 
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Originally Posted by kschachn
It is a polymer, yes. One would assume it is polymerized. Looks like more than one monomer. A VII?
It's not in the classes of rubber used as VII. A bit of research shows that the most appropriate use related to oils/additives would be to make the bottle. ExxonMobil makes it and does not list any use with regards to oils.
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1. Chemical Identity ExxonMobil Chemical's VistamaxxTM Performance Polymers are propylene based copolymers. These copolymers are made from the catalytic polymerization of propylene (C3) and ethylene (C2). CAS No.: 9010-79-1 Chemical Name: Ethylene - Propylene Copolymer 2. Product Uses These resins can be found in a wide variety of products including molded consumer articles, food or non-food packaging containers and films, compounds, hygiene products, and hot melt adhesives. 3. Physical / Chemical Properties ExxonMobil Chemical's VistamaxxTM Performance Polymers are white to off-white solids and can be clear or opaque. These resins are either in pellet or granule form and are stable solid polymers. They are generally safe at ambient conditions, due to their high molecular weight, minimal toxicity and general inertness. These resins are considered hazardous in their base form by the U.S. according to OSHA due to the possibility that they can form a combustible dust in the workplace.
Ed
 

MolaKule

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OCP's can be used in a number of products and in a number of forms but Lubrizol thinks it is the Olefin co-polymer used as a VII:
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The subject product is a liquid additive used to control viscosity in a number of industrial formulations including heavy duty diesel engine oil packages
Dissolved in an oil carrier it is a VII. In dry form it can be used to make plastic bottles, window casings, etc.
 
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Well, it looks like it was my degree that failed me. I completely missed that this compound was an OCP. It also illustrates why I avoided the organic side of chemistry as much as I could. There are ten thousand names for the same compound and they all stank. grin Thanks for the lesson, MolaKule. Ed
 
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There is the IUPAC naming convention, but it is relatively unpopular with marketing forces. The USA is absolutely not alone in this, Europeans use gas oil as a synonym for diesel fuel; in the USA gas oil is a petroleum distillation fraction from both atmospheric and vacuum dustillation processes too heavy to be used for diesel, but too light to be used as asphalt, and is the primary feed source for most fluid catalytic cracking units and hydrocracking units. The German name for gasoline (petrol) is benzin; benzene is the commin name for the compound with formula C6H6 which while having a high octane rating, is restricted in most countries to a low maximum percentage in gasoline.
 
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