Pittsburgh Brake Bleeder and Vacuum Pump Kit

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34,653
Location
NY
Thread starter
Originally Posted By: Donald
Too little volume to do a lot. A MityVac 7201 with brake bleeder attachment is a much better solution.
A little more volume would be nice, I'm working on that. For sucking out a small amount of ATF in a transmission that was overfilled it was perfect. I have the MV 7201 and didn't want to be bothered taking it out, let alone clean it. For bleeding brakes I think it will be fine too. For anything with some real volume the 7201 would have come out.
 
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19,528
Location
Lake Forest, CA
Originally Posted By: JHZR2
A suction tool is useful, but I can't see the benefits for bleeding brakes. What am I missing?
You connect a hose to bleeder valve, connect that hose to the main tube of Mityvac, connect the main tube to Mityvac container. Pump the Mityvac 4-5 times then loosen the bleeder valve by 1 turn, brake fluid will start draining into Mityvac container, keep an eye on reservoir and top off to max line 2 times, you are done on that wheel. Go to next wheel.
 
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11,652
Location
NorthEast
Few youtube celebrities have claimed that tube submerged in the brake fluid works as good as two-man or pressure bleeder to bleed the brakes. Watching them do it makes me think it is the easiest and safest method as you the one man controls everything and has the least probability of something going wrong. Pump the pedal by hand few times; that way you will not force the pedal to travel to never never land.
 
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19,528
Location
Lake Forest, CA
Originally Posted By: bmwpowere36m3
I use mine as a mini-extractor... I prefer the traditional two-man or a pressure bleeder.
I did too I loved pressure bleeder, about 10-12 years ago. I bought Motive Power Bleeder with all accessories for may cars at that time: 1994 Lexus LS400, 2000 MB E430 and 2004 Honda S2000. I tried Motive Power Bleeder on LS400 and E430 around 2006-2008, it worked okay with front wheels but didn't do much for rear wheels, the rate of fluid coming out is as slow as gravity bleed. Also, it is time consuming connecting the accessory for LS400 (the one with short chains). Why should I waste time connecting the pressure bleeder to the brake reservoir and then wait up to 1 hour for each rear wheel ? With Mityvac I can bleed both rear wheels in less than 10 minutes(I am slow and I am very careful working with corrosive brake fluid) To me, using Mityvac 7201 to bleed the brake is easy and fast and no chance for error and absolutely no mess, raise the car, setup jack stands, remove/reinstall the wheels ... are hard works.
 
Messages
19,528
Location
Lake Forest, CA
Originally Posted By: Vikas
Few youtube celebrities have claimed that tube submerged in the brake fluid works as good as two-man or pressure bleeder to bleed the brakes. Watching them do it makes me think it is the easiest and safest method as you the one man controls everything and has the least probability of something going wrong. Pump the pedal by hand few times; that way you will not force the pedal to travel to never never land.
It may, but I already bought Mityvac 7201 to do oil change for my E430, why not use it to do the brake ?
 
Messages
34,653
Location
NY
Thread starter
Originally Posted By: HTSS_TR
Originally Posted By: bmwpowere36m3
I use mine as a mini-extractor... I prefer the traditional two-man or a pressure bleeder.
I did too I loved pressure bleeder, about 10-12 years ago. I bought Motive Power Bleeder with all accessories for may cars at that time: 1994 Lexus LS400, 2000 MB E430 and 2004 Honda S2000. I tried Motive Power Bleeder on LS400 and E430 around 2006-2008, it worked okay with front wheels but didn't do much for rear wheels, the rate of fluid coming out is as slow as gravity bleed. Also, it is time consuming connecting the accessory for LS400 (the one with short chains). Why should I waste time connecting the pressure bleeder to the brake reservoir and then wait up to 1 hour for each rear wheel ? With Mityvac I can bleed both rear wheels in less than 10 minutes(I am slow and I am very careful working with corrosive brake fluid) To me, using Mityvac 7201 to bleed the brake is easy and fast and no chance for error and absolutely no mess, raise the car, setup jack stands, remove/reinstall the wheels ... are hard works.
There's nothing like feeling comfortable using a good tool! Especially when it can save you a lot of time.
 

JHZR2

Staff member
Messages
44,520
Location
New Jersey
Originally Posted By: HTSS_TR
Originally Posted By: JHZR2
A suction tool is useful, but I can't see the benefits for bleeding brakes. What am I missing?
You connect a hose to bleeder valve, connect that hose to the main tube of Mityvac, connect the main tube to Mityvac container. Pump the Mityvac 4-5 times then loosen the bleeder valve by 1 turn, brake fluid will start draining into Mityvac container, keep an eye on reservoir and top off to max line 2 times, you are done on that wheel. Go to next wheel.
Thanks. With a pressure bleeder, you replace the fluid in the reservoir and then pressurize with the pressure bleeder, go around to all four corners and pull fluid... Done. I'm not really saying there's a wrong/bad way, it just seems to me that pressurizing once is slightly easier, and you can flow more, longer if desired.
 
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11,652
Location
NorthEast
I think the advantage with dedicated brake fluid contraption is that you don't have to worry about mixing the fluids in the tool or having to thoroughly clean it. Brake fluid really does a number on all the extractor type tools having rubber parts whether it is a simple turkey baster or an over-sized syringe.
 
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24,120
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
I just used mine a short time ago to diagnose leaking vacuum operated headlights on an old Buick Riviera. It is very useful tool for use on the old MB cars with vacuum locking system which includes the fuel door and trunk, being able to apply vacuum to individual components in the engine compartment with the small tool makes life easier. It seems most posters are talking about its fluid transfer ability which it does fine for small amounts but its value as a diagnostic tool is far beyond that, its one tool I wouldn't want to be without. I use the Mityvac 8500.
 
Messages
835
Location
Connecticut, USA
Originally Posted By: HTSS_TR
Originally Posted By: bmwpowere36m3
I use mine as a mini-extractor... I prefer the traditional two-man or a pressure bleeder.
I did too I loved pressure bleeder, about 10-12 years ago. I bought Motive Power Bleeder with all accessories for may cars at that time: 1994 Lexus LS400, 2000 MB E430 and 2004 Honda S2000. I tried Motive Power Bleeder on LS400 and E430 around 2006-2008, it worked okay with front wheels but didn't do much for rear wheels, the rate of fluid coming out is as slow as gravity bleed. Also, it is time consuming connecting the accessory for LS400 (the one with short chains). Why should I waste time connecting the pressure bleeder to the brake reservoir and then wait up to 1 hour for each rear wheel ? With Mityvac I can bleed both rear wheels in less than 10 minutes(I am slow and I am very careful working with corrosive brake fluid) To me, using Mityvac 7201 to bleed the brake is easy and fast and no chance for error and absolutely no mess, raise the car, setup jack stands, remove/reinstall the wheels ... are hard works.
Everyone has different experiences... I've never had issues with rate of flow or time to bleed. As far as vacuum, I don't like the idea of pulling fluid and potentially introducing air. It also never fails that the air leaks past the bleeder threads and it seems (constant stream of bubbles) like your never done bleeding. I will however use a vacuum bleeder on a motorcycle when a dry system (brake line R&R) to get fluid going... and then finish via manual bleeding.
 
Messages
835
Location
Connecticut, USA
Originally Posted By: Vikas
Few youtube celebrities have claimed that tube submerged in the brake fluid works as good as two-man or pressure bleeder to bleed the brakes. Watching them do it makes me think it is the easiest and safest method as you the one man controls everything and has the least probability of something going wrong. Pump the pedal by hand few times; that way you will not force the pedal to travel to never never land.
I don't see the need to have the line submerged if your applying vacuum... open MC reservoir cap, make sure its full, attach "bleeder" hose to caliper, apply vacuum and open bleeder nipple.
 
Messages
6,136
Location
Illinois
Most cars have some sort of restriction for the back brakes. My Tauruses use to have a mechanical valve in the rear that if the wheels were not supported it would cut flow. And every method of bleeding other than pressure I always had problems with the threads on the bleeder screw. So I usually will back the screw out and put some liquid thread sealant on them to stop the air form getting drawn back into the lines through the threads.
 
Messages
6,136
Location
Illinois
Originally Posted By: bmwpowere36m3
Originally Posted By: Vikas
Few youtube celebrities have claimed that tube submerged in the brake fluid works as good as two-man or pressure bleeder to bleed the brakes. Watching them do it makes me think it is the easiest and safest method as you the one man controls everything and has the least probability of something going wrong. Pump the pedal by hand few times; that way you will not force the pedal to travel to never never land.
I don't see the need to have the line submerged if your applying vacuum... open MC reservoir cap, make sure its full, attach "bleeder" hose to caliper, apply vacuum and open bleeder nipple.
I usually use the hose in a bottle method. The hose has a split in it near the bottom and a bolt with hose clamp to plug the end.
 
Messages
835
Location
Connecticut, USA
Originally Posted By: HTSS_TR
Originally Posted By: Vikas
Few youtube celebrities have claimed that tube submerged in the brake fluid works as good as two-man or pressure bleeder to bleed the brakes. Watching them do it makes me think it is the easiest and safest method as you the one man controls everything and has the least probability of something going wrong. Pump the pedal by hand few times; that way you will not force the pedal to travel to never never land.
It may, but I already bought Mityvac 7201 to do oil change for my E430, why not use it to do the brake ?
Have the same Mityvac in the shop and a large pneumatic one as well... both a intended for oil extraction. I mainly use the pneumatic one (too lazy to pump) and its generally to suck up fluid in PS and brake MC reservoirs. Sometimes when you overfill engine or ATs. The Mityvac was handier when we still had boats. I'm sure they could be adapted to brake bleeding, but the internals might not hold up to long brake fluid exposure.
 
Messages
835
Location
Connecticut, USA
Originally Posted By: SHOZ
Originally Posted By: bmwpowere36m3
Originally Posted By: Vikas
Few youtube celebrities have claimed that tube submerged in the brake fluid works as good as two-man or pressure bleeder to bleed the brakes. Watching them do it makes me think it is the easiest and safest method as you the one man controls everything and has the least probability of something going wrong. Pump the pedal by hand few times; that way you will not force the pedal to travel to never never land.
I don't see the need to have the line submerged if your applying vacuum... open MC reservoir cap, make sure its full, attach "bleeder" hose to caliper, apply vacuum and open bleeder nipple.
I usually use the hose in a bottle method. The hose has a split in it near the bottom and a bolt with hose clamp to plug the end.
? I always use a "catch bottle" (homemade, Motive, etc..), but having the line submerged is only beneficial when doing a manual bleed... then you can pump without opening/closing the bleeder without worrying of introducing air. I really speeds up the process when your flushing a lot of fluid thru. However I always finish the bleed with "pressure".
 
Messages
11,652
Location
NorthEast
Quote:
I don't see the need to have the line submerged if your applying vacuum... open MC reservoir cap, make sure its full, attach "bleeder" hose to caliper, apply vacuum and open bleeder nipple.
The included manual from the vacuum bleeder tool tells you to put some brake fluid in the reservoir so that the incoming hose is submerged in it. This prevents air getting back in to the bleeder in all cases.
 
Messages
835
Location
Connecticut, USA
Originally Posted By: Vikas
Quote:
I don't see the need to have the line submerged if your applying vacuum... open MC reservoir cap, make sure its full, attach "bleeder" hose to caliper, apply vacuum and open bleeder nipple.
The included manual from the vacuum bleeder tool tells you to put some brake fluid in the reservoir so that the incoming hose is submerged in it. This prevents air getting back in to the bleeder in all cases.
Close the bleeder before you release the trigger... otherwise you severely limit the capacity of the jug.
 
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