Oil Fuel Dilution - Saturation Point?

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Northern Michigan
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Vehicle: 2018 Honda CRV 1.5l (GDI Turbo)...yes it is a fuel diluter Recommend Oil: 0W20...I now use 0W30 Sump Capacity: 3.7qts with filter change OCI: 5000mi Driving Style: Rural...minimum 10mi drive (one way) every time the vehicle is used. 20k mi per year, so I change the oil like every three months. My wife drives this, and has a lead foot for sure. So, after an oil change the oil level quickly rises (after say 500 - 600 miles) 3/8" on the dip stick which equates to about 0.6qts...and seems to stay at that level till the next oil change. I know that 3/8" on the dipstick equals about 0.6qts because I measure the oil I drain out after a change. I realize that cold weather and short trips enhance the issue...but this vehicle never sees short trips and this past oil change was over the summer so no cold weather. So my question - is there a saturation point where only so much fuel can collect in the oil, at that point the rest burns off?
 
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Canada
My wive's 2018 Civic with the 1.5T was recalled a few months ago, is it possible your CRV is under that recall? Back to your question, long highway rides at operating temp would be the best way to burn off the excess fuel. High temperature is the only way to control fuel dilution, not the quantity of fuel in oil.
 
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WA
It'll just continue to form a homogeneous mixture right?.. what burns off, burns off but as long as fuel is added you'll basically have a "Foil" instead of an oil?...‚
 
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Originally Posted by Mad_Hatter
It'll just continue to form a homogeneous mixture right?.. what burns off, burns off but as long as fuel is added you'll basically have a "Foil" instead of an oil?...‚
Is this helpful?
 
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Northern Michigan
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Originally Posted by PimTac
Originally Posted by Mad_Hatter
It'll just continue to form a homogeneous mixture right?.. what burns off, burns off but as long as fuel is added you'll basically have a "Foil" instead of an oil?...‚
Is this helpful?
Yes, sort of what I was thinking...the fuel that absorbs in the oil does not seem to readily burn off.
 
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102
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Northern Michigan
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Originally Posted by Ded Mazai
I'd be more concerned about the fuel dilution itself and how to prevent it. Bumping up the oil viscosity is not going to solve the problem.
Yes I am concerned about fuel dilution which is why I am asking...the higher viscosity doesn't solve the problem, but gives me more "cushion" to keep the motor lubricated as the fuel cuts back the oils starting viscosity.
 
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4,165
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WA
Originally Posted by PimTac
Originally Posted by Mad_Hatter
It'll just continue to form a homogeneous mixture right?.. what burns off, burns off but as long as fuel is added you'll basically have a "Foil" instead of an oil?...‚
Is this helpful?
You mean like when someone asks a question about dealer oil change/practices and your ONLY comment in the thread is this👇...Hypocrite/troll...
Originally Posted by PimTac
They are all out to get you. GDA
And yes, per the OP it was helpful. Sorry you couldn't see it PimTac.....
 
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JAG

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Fredericksburg, VA
The rate of evaporation of fuel out of the oil is proportional to the concentration of fuel in the oil. That causes the fuel concentration to increase most rapidly when there is no fuel in the oil and over time, the concentration keeps increasing but at a slower and slower rate, until it reaches an uneasy equilibrium. I say uneasy because any changes to the system will cause fluctuations in the fuel concentration, like doing more short trips, changing air temperatures, driving habits, etc.
 
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102
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Northern Michigan
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Originally Posted by JAG
The rate of evaporation of fuel out of the oil is proportional to the concentration of fuel in the oil. That causes the fuel concentration to increase most rapidly when there is no fuel in the oil and over time, the concentration keeps increasing but at a slower and slower rate, until it reaches an uneasy equilibrium. I say uneasy because any changes to the system will cause fluctuations in the fuel concentration, like doing more short trips, changing air temperatures, driving habits, etc.
Thank you for this...I suspected something such as this was going on.
 
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