Oil Bypass filtration, can oil starvation happen,someone explain please

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1
Location
Surrey, BC, Canada
Thread starter
Hi All. I was looking at the remote oil filter adapters and kind of got confused by a few comments/theories/posts. Especially the engine damage post this guy had on a dual filter bypass. go to post #19 https://www.f150forum.com/f72/budget...-90460/index2/ I'm confused, please educate me. and THANK YOU. 1, Originally I was looking at the following simply relocation kit, so that the filter is at a more accessible location. the change in pressure would be small depending on hose length and filter resistance. correct me if I'm wrong. [Linked Image from i.ibb.co] 2, Then I found some of us are putting in a parallel dual filter bypass kit, made by either amsoil hayden derale transdapt permacool, etc. I see people put in two full-flow filters which I think only increase oil capacity and soot-holding capacity, but it does not filter out smaller particles at all. Others puts in a full-flow and a bypass filter, the bypass filter has a much higher resistance and hypothetically 90% through full-flow and 10% through bypass filter. but wouldn't all the oil just go through the full-flow since it has less resistance? and downstream of bypass filter being connected to that of full-flow, wouldn't the back pressure further restricted the flow through bypass filter. back pressure shown in green. [Linked Image from i.ibb.co] Many people said the bypass filter is beneficial because smaller particles, 2-10 micron, do more damage to the engine in long run. but the the guy in other thread had damage within 11,500 miles by the oil starvation in upper engine. Is the bypass system really the cause. 3. it makes a lot more sense to me that the bypass filter is in a separate route similar to the following diagram, although the pressure would also drop in the rest of the oil passage, say the camshaft in this case. [Linked Image from i.ibb.co] __________________ 2014 XLT SuperCrew, 5.0L, 302A, 4x4, Oxford White, 157", 6.5' bed, 3.55, Chrome Package, Ford dropin bedliner, Leer 700 cover, 20" Chrome Clad Wheels, chrome billet lower grille. berlinbai is online now Report Post
 
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Messages
1,518
Location
SW Ontario Canada
It takes a very cold outdoor temp, far colder than you see in Surrey BC, or a very plugged filter to have the engine filter go into bypass for measurable time. Given that you are new to BITOG, the second scenario is pretty remote too. Engines will have some residual oil on the critical surfaces to prevent most damage during a cold start - a normal operating condition, provided the engine doesn't see full load 5 seconds after the thing starts. Yes, internet engine oil threads are made to split hairs...but your engine will be fine in 500,000km if you follow even the most average OCI - regardless of how you mount your remote filter.
 
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Messages
2,949
Location
Western S.C.
I'm not particularly knowledgeable about bypass filtration, but will venture this: The system diagrammed under your #3 could lead to significantly reduced oil pressure and flow in the bearings, etc., if restriction through the bypass circuit is not high, compared to the original oiling circuit. I don't see any fundamental problem in the #1 diagram.
 
Messages
6
Location
NM, USA
System #1 works fine as a full flow Filter relocation. Notice that the diagram uses NO 90 degree fittings. If you use 90 fittings, they have to be the high flow bent tube style, not drilled brass. System #3 is the easiest way to do a bypass.The bypass circuit needs a restriction so less than 10% of the oil flows thru. My pressure dropped less than 2 lbs. The low pressure oil return from the bypass can go many different places. Oil filler cap, valve cover, oil pan, Dodge even made a hollow bolt to go into the block at the fuel pump mount. System #2 only works if the filter mount is engineered to force the oil thru the bypass filter like the Amsoil unit does.
 
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Messages
24,807
Location
Upstate NY
I am not a fan of adding hoses and connections solely to make it easier to change the oil filter. Hoses can fail as can connections to the fitting. I did add a bypass filter to my PSD. And I do worry about hose chaffing so I check those on a regular basis. The bypass kit I bought was made specifically for my year truck. No hose clamps.
 
Messages
2,949
Location
Western S.C.
Correction: Where I mentioned system #1 in my previous post, I meant #2. The percentage of flow going through each filter will depend on their relative resistances, if I understand the diagram correctly.
 
Messages
528
Location
Kelowna, BC, Canada
Here's my filters for engine bypass and transmission.:) Engine is an Amsoil Dual Gard and Frantz in series, the transmission is a Amsoil Dual Remote and a MotorGuard M100 in Parallel. [Linked Image] [Linked Image] [Linked Image]
 
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Messages
9,912
Location
Jupiter, Florida
While I don't know what caused that F150's engine to fail, I strongly suspect the bypass filter setup did restrict the oil flow just enough to cause problems. The Ford Modular engines of this vintage already don't have sufficient oil flow to the heads. This is due to a poor oil pump design, with a stamped sheet metal backplate that allows some oil to escape. The owner mentioned that the crankshaft had too much end play and this may have been a contributing factor. Maybe.... But it's good to know that end play is not known to "relieve" oil pressure. In my case, I simply use 10W-30 M1. It's a little more viscous and it's use is known to prevent problems. 140,000 miles without issue, whereas many 2009 5.4L's fail around 100K. Again, it's not unusual for "healthy" 2008-2010 Ford 4.6 and 5.4 3 valve engines to, at times, have near zero oil pressure in the heads. The left head sometimes fails first. I do use a bypass filter on my Lister Diesel engine. But that engine does not have any pressurized bearings. They are all splash lube. The oil pump simply squirts oil on the roller bearings. I'm 100% sure a well designed submicron bypass filter can help extend engine life. HOWEVER, frequent oil changes do exactly the same thing AND MORE. Namely removal of combustion by products, particulates and the evaporated remains of fuel that bypasses the piston rings.
 
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