Odd filter issue

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AZ
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I purchased Pro-Tec oil filters after reading on this website that some folks were satisfied with them. I purchased three models for 3 cars (of course): Pro-Tec 163 Pro-Tec 167 Pro-Tec 130 The 163 and the 167 have a strange quality. I can't blow air or suck air through the mounting hole. I can suck air through on the 130, but not blow air through. I suppose it makes some sense that anti-siphon valves might prevent blowing into the filters, but it seems like I should be able to draw air through the mounting hole since that's the way the oil travels. I checked all 3 filters against counterparts I had in my garage (that I know work): Parts Plus PH2840 v Pro-Tec 163 goes on a Toyota I4 Pronto PO4006 v Pro-Tec 167 goes on a Chevy V8 Pronto PO241 v Pro-Tec 130 goes on a Toyota I6 On the PH2840 (163) I was able to suck air through but not blow air through (I could actually blow just a little air through). So they are different. On the PO4006 (167) I was able to both suck and blow air through. So they are different. On the PO241 (130) I could suck air through though not as easily as I could on the 130. I could not blow air through. So those two were consistent. Now I'm concerned about putting them on the engines and … well, you know. I'd appreciate any knowledge out there that would help me resolve my dilemma. Thanks much.
 
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35
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MA
For the filters that you cannot pull air thru, possibly the anti-drainback valve surface is slightly sticking to the end cap surface. That rubber valve has probably been sitting in that position in who-knows-what kind of environmental conditions for who-knows-how-long. I would bet that as soon as a bit of oil is pushed against the ADBV surface (in the correct direction of course), it will unstick. (Hopefully). For the one that you can pull and push air thru, rubber valve may be unseated slightly, just enough to not seal. It may seal properly when warm oil is running thru the filter. Perhaps try pushing gently on the rubber ADBV surface in a couple spots (if it is that type of construction of filter) and recheck. Now then, since you got me wondering what my filters do, i just checked an XG7317. I pushed air into the center: it did not allow air to pass thru, as expected. However, when i pulled air thru the center, it also did not allow air thru until i pulled a bit harder vacuum. Upon applying more vacuum, the silicone valve unseated and made a whistling noise. Therefore the ADBV surface must be made to provide a pretty good seal! I say use ‘em.
 
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"Can you please post some pictures of the bases of those filters?"v --- Like the bottom outside? Opposite from the thread side?
 
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Originally Posted by fatrap314
"Can you please post some pictures of the bases of those filters?"v --- Like the bottom outside? Opposite from the thread side?
Yes the base where the threads are at and showing the anti-drainback valve.
 
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MA
Originally Posted by fatrap314
Thanks VolvoZ, that's helpful.
Most people indeed go thru life not trying, testing, examining, interrogating, studying things. I have never checked my filters before like that, but i learned something new today. I do inspect all my filters before installing. Sometimes there are metal shavings and other debris inside the filter right out of the box. Obviously, i clean it out so it does not get into the engine. Following story emphasizes why it is important to inspect the oil filter: A friend of mine gave me a filter to cut open and inspect. It came from his Toyota Corolla (really old one) that incurred an engine failure. Not sure what the problem was with the engine. Anyway, when i took the filter apart, the elastomer ADBV was manufactured/positioned off center, so i don't think it was entirely functional in terms of preventing drain back. If the filter is horizontally mounted in that application, that probably wasn't doing any favors for the engine. Could that have caused the engine failure? Will never know, but the point is, that it's a good idea to inspect them before install.
 
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24,164
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PNW
Originally Posted by Blkstanger
You blowing and sucking on these filters is NOT a valid test. Human lungs are not built anything like an oil pump.
If you blow into the base plate center hole with minimal force and there is no flow, then the ADBV is sealing pretty well. Sucking on the center hole is not a good test however as noted - not enough force can be developed by mouth to open the ADBV. Put a shop vac on the center hole however will get the ADBV to open with enough air flow going the same direction as the oil would in use.
 
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Originally Posted by Chris142
I have never heard of someone doing that to an oil filter. What is you're reason?
It's the ADBV "blow test" to see if it's sealing well. Been talked about for years here.
 
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Originally Posted by ZeeOSix
... Sucking on the center hole is not a good test however as noted - not enough force can be developed by mouth to open the ADBV. Put a shop vac on the center hole however will get the ADBV to open with enough air flow going the same direction as the oil would in use.
I ain't buyin' it. 1. First of all, pressure differential is the relevant quantity, not force. 2. I once knew a car engine that, when its oil pump lost prime during an oil change, had difficulty opening a stuck ADBV on a brand of filters that filters that typically failed the oral suck test. (Yes, obviously the pump could overcome the sticking, once primed.) 3. I wouldn't bet much on a "shop-vac" exceeding the level of suction that "can be developed by mouth" at zero flow rate.
 
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Originally Posted by CR94
Originally Posted by ZeeOSix
... Sucking on the center hole is not a good test however as noted - not enough force can be developed by mouth to open the ADBV. Put a shop vac on the center hole however will get the ADBV to open with enough air flow going the same direction as the oil would in use.
I ain't buyin' it. 1. First of all, pressure differential is the relevant quantity, not force.
Clarification - I was not implying that a vacuum cleaner on the base plate center hole would open the ADBV the same amount as oil flow in use. I was saying a good vacuum cleaner will open the ADBV way easier than a person's mouth. It takes a constant air flow to keep it open - something a human can't maintain. The one inhale volume would suck most of the air volume out of the filter before the ADBV would crack open, and the person's remaining inhale volume would be pretty lacking at that point to cause enough air flow to open the ADBV. The ADBV opens due to force impinging on it due to flow, and the distance it opens is dependant on the flow rate. So it is a force that makes it open - what else would it be.
Originally Posted by CR94
2. I once knew a car engine that, when its oil pump lost prime during an oil change, had difficulty opening a stuck ADBV on a brand of filters that filters that typically failed the oral suck test. (Yes, obviously the pump could overcome the sticking, once primed.) 3. I wouldn't bet much on a "shop-vac" exceeding the level of suction that "can be developed by mouth" at zero flow rate.
I've done the vacuum cleaner trick on the base plate center hole of many filters with a small powerful vacuum cleaner, and can detect air flow through the filter - so the ADBV is cracking open. The suction tube on the vacuum cleaner was just a little larger than the center hole in the base plate and sealed well. A good vacuum cleaner can put more suction on the filter while maintaing a decent air flow (which cracks opens the ADBV) than anyone could with their mouth. Try it sometime.
 
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11
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AZ
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"Sucking on an oil filter will allow air to travel through the filter media" ---- You'd think so. Sometimes it did and sometimes it didn't. That's my concern.
 
Messages
11
Location
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"not enough force can be developed by mouth to open the ADBV. " ----- On some of the filters this is apparently true, but on some of the filters it's apparently false. Some allowed air through and some did not. That's my concern.
 
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24,164
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PNW
Originally Posted by fatrap314
"not enough force can be developed by mouth to open the ADBV. " ----- On some of the filters this is apparently true, but on some of the filters it's apparently false. Some allowed air through and some did not. That's my concern.
On the ones you find to be true, it's possible the ADBV is not sealing 100%. Are those also the same ones that won't dead end when blown into the filter?
 
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