Motorcycle oil question

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4
Location
West Virginia
Thread starter
I run Royal Purple oil in all my vehicles. I am going to change oil soon on my motorcycle. I am considering running Royal Purple Max Cycle Oil 10w30 and a K&N oil filter. Can I run it without any issues? I have a Yamaha V-Star 1300 Tourer with less than 1000 miles. Thanks
 
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1,278
Location
Ca USA
Royal Purple Max Cycle Oil 10w30 should meet and exceed your mileage expectations... There was a K&N safety recall back in 2016 for certain K&N oil filters, Part Nos. KN-204 (black) and KN-204C (chrome), manufactured between March 1, 2016 and September 30, 2016 can leak oil at the area where a nut (intended for use to remove the oil filter during routine oil changes) is welded to the end of the filter. If there is such a leak, oil could come into contact with the rear tire or rear brake of the motorcycle on which the filter is installed. If this were to occur, it could lead to a loss of control or a crash. Therefore, K&N offered to replace the affected oil filters at no charge... I continue to employ a K&N 303 filter on Mr.RC45 and I have used OEM and High Flow with equal satisfaction... [Linked Image from vfrdiscussion.com]
 
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638
Location
Colorado, USA
Do you have an owner's manual or a service manual for your bike? I searched the internet for a couple minutes and here's what your owner's manual says. Are ambient temperatures always less than 70 degrees Fahrenheit? The chart shows what the bike should be using. 10w30 isn't it, unfortunately, so I would not use that oil weight regardless of the brand. The bike is liquid cooled, choose a 10w40 or 15w40 and be done with it, go ride! [Linked Image]
 
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4,150
Location
N.C.
According to the chart that Bonz posted, and your location, 10w30 would be the least desirable weight on the list. Since you use RP in all your vehicles it looks like since you have a 10w30 stash and it's easy to come by, you might want to keep it simple and draw from the stash for your bike, which is understandable. The 10w40 is ideal for your bike. When I owned my Suzuki DL1000 I got my RP 10w40 from NAPA, but don't know if they still carry it.
 
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Messages
638
Location
Colorado, USA
BLS, it is not a recommended oil weight for summer temperatures so it will not "meet and exceed his mileage expectations". VSTAR1, is that a new(er) purchase of previous year(s) model? I noticed the bike has less than 1,000 miles on it and is a 2017. What oil weight are you currently using? Since you are considering using RP 10w30 I gather you haven't purchased it yet. If you want to run the proper weight for the upcoming summer temperatures the chart shows you what to do irregardless of some advice that has been posted. Cheers2
 
Messages
243
Location
Hedgesville, WV
I would not run that weight oil in a shared sump motorcycle ever. When I bought my Roadliner Yamaha recommended 20w40 but when they discontinued that weight they superseded that recommendation with a 20w50 but I noticed that on cool mornings in the spring and fall the bike cranked slow so I switched to 15w40 HDEO and have been running that for the last 15,000 miles with no issues. With your options I would run the 10w40 but run the OEM filter until the end of your warranty just in case and dont go by their OCI. If you pay attention the bike will tell you when its time to change because the shifting will change. It just wont be as smooth. I end up changing every 2500-3000 miles. The gear box will shear your oil out of grade real fast so you might want to get a UOA at the first change with the new oil.
 
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Messages
4,150
Location
N.C.
Originally Posted by Bonz
BLS, it is not a recommended oil weight for summer temperatures so it will not "meet and exceed his mileage expectations". VSTAR1, is that a new(er) purchase of previous year(s) model? I noticed the bike has less than 1,000 miles on it and is a 2017. What oil weight are you currently using? Since you are considering using RP 10w30 I gather you haven't purchased it yet. If you want to run the proper weight for the upcoming summer temperatures the chart shows you what to do irregardless of some advice that has been posted. Cheers2
. Respectfully, I just googled the temperature in Charleston, W.V. and as of 11:00 am it was 86 degrees. According to the chart the 10w30 is recommended for temperatures between 10 degrees and 70 degrees. The 10w40 is good for temperatures between 10 degrees and 110 degrees. As I stated before, the 10w30 is the worst choice of those shown considering the op's location. thumbsup
 
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2,380
Location
pa
in Pa i use 15-50 in all my motorcycles, real synthetic or the maxima semi-syn said to have 50% ester. i rarely ride under 60 + the 15W starts easily!!
 
Messages
638
Location
Colorado, USA
Originally Posted by gman2304
Respectfully, I just googled the temperature in Charleston, W.V. and as of 11:00 am it was 86 degrees. According to the chart the 10w30 is recommended for temperatures between 10 degrees and 70 degrees. The 10w40 is good for temperatures between 10 degrees and 110 degrees. As I stated before, the 10w30 is the worst choice of those shown considering the op's location. thumbsup
Precisely, the chart tells him what to do. The 10w30 mantra getting repeated is flat wrong if someone would take the time to look at what Yamaha actually recommends and where the person lives. It's not hard. I'm going to call it out every time. With respect to oil shear, I've run both Mobil motorcycle oils (10w40 4T and 20w50 V Twin) in my shared sump on 5,000 mile oil change intervals. Both maintained excellent shift quality and analysis showed they stayed in grade with 20w50 in the middle of grade and the 10w40 right on the bottom edge. Starting as a 30 weight it's not going to feel as good or shift as nicely as a 40 weight that may eventually drop down to a 30 weight. Fact. It's when the oil drops down to the 30 weight that the shift quality degrades. Sounds silly but I take my shifting seriously and do not want missed shifts or poor feel at the shifter. I have probably tried 12 different oils in my bike and done analysis on every one. 15w40, 5w40, 20w50, 15w50, 10w40. Both oils mentioned above were the best for shift quality and still had so much TBN left they probably could have 10,000 miles unless shift quality fell off first which I suspect would have happened.
 
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4,449
Location
Pittsburgh,PA U.S.A.
10W - 30 is the wrong oil for summer use in that bike. 15W - 50 would be a great choice and should hold up if the bike is ever caught in very slow or stopped traffic on a very hot day. That is what I would put in it if it were mine. It is no fun to be riding on a very hot day and run into very slow stop and go traffic and have the engine stall because the oil can not handle the heat, and that is what could happen with 10W - 30.
 
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1,865
Location
Somewhere in time
Originally Posted by JimPghPA
10W - 30 is the wrong oil for summer use in that bike. 15W - 50 would be a great choice and should hold up if the bike is ever caught in very slow or stopped traffic on a very hot day. That is what I would put in it if it were mine. It is no fun to be riding on a very hot day and run into very slow stop and go traffic and have the engine stall because the oil can not handle the heat, and that is what could happen with 10W - 30.
Unless his liquid cooling system is spec'd incorrectly by the Yamaha engineers this should never occur unless he is in Death Valley. And in that circumstance the bike overheating will be the least of his worries.
 
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4,156
Location
South Carolina
Originally Posted by tomcat27
My vstar calls for 20w40, 10w40, or 20w50 I would would run RP.
Originally Posted by tomcat27
My vstar calls for 20w40, 10w40, or 20w50 I would would run RP.
This is correct. I would not run a 10w30 oil in that bike. A minimum of 10/40 And even then you will find your shifting goes south in warm weather after 1000 miles or so. I'm not sure of the West Virginia summer climate but I would not run less than 15W40 and prefer 20W50 in the summer. With the 20w50 you'll notice nice shifting holds up a lot longer. As far as oil brand it doesn't matter but I really liked Valvoline conventional 20W50 motorcycle oil In that bike. If you'd like something a little lighter in your climate a little cooler, HDEO 15w40. I see someone above recommended 15w50 that would be another great choice. Actually there's another good post by BONZ, if you were to run just synthetic I too would go with the mobil 1 motorcycle oil I think he is dead on that your shift quality will be maintained until the time to change the oil
 
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Messages
938
Location
Arizona
That chart is pretty much standard for any Japanese motorcycle as far back as i remember. You cant go wrong with M1 15w50 or shell T6 15w40 car oil and trans will shift like butter. Available from WM on the cheap or If money is no object get the pricey MC specific.
 
Messages
4
Location
West Virginia
Thread starter
Hey guys I didn't mean 10w30, I have 10w40 Royal Purple...that was my bad, sorry.Any suggestions on an oil filter.since K&N didn't seem filter of choice. I have Royal Purple Max Cycle in 10x40. Thanks again.guys
 
Messages
4
Location
West Virginia
Thread starter
Hey guys I didn't mean 10w30, I have 10w40 Royal Purple...that was my bad, sorry.Any suggestions on an oil filter.since K&N didn't seem filter of choice. I have Royal Purple Max Cycle in 10x40. Thanks again.guys .Its a 2012 model and doesn't get ridden much, I may switch to 15w40. You guys are great help....thanks. Looking 4 you input on a filter
 
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Messages
638
Location
Colorado, USA
Yeah if it's a 2012 and only has 1,000 miles on it, don't spend your money on a boutique synthetic or any synthetic for that matter. 10w40 will do you fine, you don't ride it enough to shear the oil before you should change it each year because of time passing by, not the miles on the oil. With Covid I was teaching from my house and it was easy to get out in the afternoon on the motorcycle for a ride many more days that I would have otherwise. Almost 3,000 miles on the Mobil 1 10w40 4T since I changed it late last fall before the winter. Very easily will go 6,000 miles total or more this riding season. I'm going to take one for the team and change it out around 6,000 miles and see how the oil does versus a 5,000 mile oil change.
 
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1,278
Location
Ca USA
The Importance of Viscosity? Quote Blackstone Labs The viscosity, or thickness of the oil, is not nearly as important as many people think. Oil retains its nature no matter what thickness it is.Think about this: automakers are continually recommending lighter multi-grade oil in new engines. The reason is increased efficiency. It takes power to pump oil through an engine, and the lighter the oil, the less power required to pump it. The oil's ability to act like a solid and protect parts is not related to its thickness. If that doesn't sound quite right, consider this: The gears in a heavy duty Allison automatic transmission are doing the same work as the same machine equipped with an Eaton manual transmission. Due to the hydraulics of the automatic, it runs on a 10W automatic transmission oil.But the manual transmission uses a very thick (sometimes up to 90W)gear lube oil. The gears of both types of transmissions will have a similar life span. We don't find any significant differences in wear, regardless of oil thickness.
 
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24,196
Location
PNW
Originally Posted by BusyLittleShop
The Importance of Viscosity? Quote Blackstone Labs The viscosity, or thickness of the oil, is not nearly as important as many people think. Oil retains its nature no matter what thickness it is.Think about this: automakers are continually recommending lighter multi-grade oil in new engines. The reason is increased efficiency. It takes power to pump oil through an engine, and the lighter the oil, the less power required to pump it. The oil's ability to act like a solid and protect parts is not related to its thickness. If that doesn't sound quite right, consider this: The gears in a heavy duty Allison automatic transmission are doing the same work as the same machine equipped with an Eaton manual transmission. Due to the hydraulics of the automatic, it runs on a 10W automatic transmission oil.But the manual transmission uses a very thick (sometimes up to 90W)gear lube oil. The gears of both types of transmissions will have a similar life span. We don't find any significant differences in wear, regardless of oil thickness.
Blackstone doesn't really know much about tribology. The most basic aspect known in tribology is that the oil viscosity does effect MOFT between moving parts, which in turn will effect engine wear. There is a reason that 99% of the motorcycles on the road don't specify thinner oils. What's their definition of "significant differences". The majority of Blackstone's UOAs are for passenger car engine, not motorcycle engines which are a different animal. So that statement above does not fit everything on the road.
 
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