Is CR-V AWD really that bad?

Ws6

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Originally Posted by Brigadier
Originally Posted by Ws6
Originally Posted by edyvw
Originally Posted by Brigadier
Well, I must have been dreaming when my fake AWD Santa Fe drove right around stuck Jeeps and Subarus going up hills this last winter. And going down the other side of the hill, on ice, the ABS never kicked in. Especially since i didn't have dedicated snow tires, just the TrueContact Tours....yep, must've been a dream. BTW, I never could tell if I was in FWD or AWD. The transitions were seemless.
It's all about tires.
Tires matter a ton, but even using mediocre tires, AWD makes the magic happen while FWD/RWD will leave you stranded in many circumstances. No, it won't help you turn or stop, but it will help you out of the drive way.
If you think the TrueContact Tour is a mediocre tire, you need to do some research. And reread my post - climbing up and down hills covered in Seattle area snow/ice. A little more than just getting out of the driveway.
I never addressed your tires. That said, I've been looking at those vs. RT43's. Which and why?
 
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Originally Posted by Ws6
I never addressed your tires. That said, I've been looking at those vs. RT43's. Which and why?
I do not have any experience with the RT43's. My past experience in the mid to late 90s with General Tire keeps me from considering them. Past experience with my dad and Continentals on his VWs has been extremely positive. So my first set was for my wife's Mazda3 - Control Contacts. Long mileage warranty, and the way they handled the Seattle rain and snow, on a 2WD car has been impressive indeed. My past experience with AWD vehicles and Seattle snow showed me that dedicated snow tires are not needed on a good AWD vehicle, if you drive sanely, as one should anyway regardless. I originally wanted to get the GY WeatherReady tires like I got for my son's 2WD Escape- his college is in central WA where there is snow for months. The 3PMS rating will help him over Snoqualmie pass when WSDOT declares traction tires required. However, after getting his tires just before school, I needed to save a bit of money....I have wiggle room on the AWD SantaFe. So, watching tire reviews from Tire Rack on the TrueContact Tours was very favorable in dry, wet, and snow. The customer reviews on the Discount Tire website were glowing as well. So at $50 less per tire that the GY, I went for it. To say that the performance is all conditions is excellent is an understatement. And my son says that the GY were well worth the $$ for his car in Ellensburg snow.
 
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Originally Posted by Brigadier
Originally Posted by edyvw
Originally Posted by Brigadier
Well, I must have been dreaming when my fake AWD Santa Fe drove right around stuck Jeeps and Subarus going up hills this last winter. And going down the other side of the hill, on ice, the ABS never kicked in. Especially since i didn't have dedicated snow tires, just the TrueContact Tours....yep, must've been a dream. BTW, I never could tell if I was in FWD or AWD. The transitions were seemless.
It's all about tires.
But, but, but, they weren't dedicated snow tires and I wasn't driving a VW or Audi, so I must be lying, right? I was driving a cheap, low end Korean SUV with mediocre all season tires.....how could this happen?
When you drive 2mph they won't slip. And yeah, probably you are lying. It is tin can after all.
 
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Originally Posted by Ws6
Originally Posted by edyvw
Originally Posted by Brigadier
Well, I must have been dreaming when my fake AWD Santa Fe drove right around stuck Jeeps and Subarus going up hills this last winter. And going down the other side of the hill, on ice, the ABS never kicked in. Especially since i didn't have dedicated snow tires, just the TrueContact Tours....yep, must've been a dream. BTW, I never could tell if I was in FWD or AWD. The transitions were seemless.
It's all about tires.
Tires matter a ton, but even using mediocre tires, AWD makes the magic happen while FWD/RWD will leave you stranded in many circumstances. No, it won't help you turn or stop, but it will help you out of the drive way.
No it won't. I would take FWD or RWD with snow tires any day in snow over AWD with all seasons. Again, people do not die because they do not go forward fast enough, but bcs they cannot stop fast enough.
 

Ws6

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Originally Posted by edyvw
Originally Posted by Ws6
Originally Posted by edyvw
Originally Posted by Brigadier
Well, I must have been dreaming when my fake AWD Santa Fe drove right around stuck Jeeps and Subarus going up hills this last winter. And going down the other side of the hill, on ice, the ABS never kicked in. Especially since i didn't have dedicated snow tires, just the TrueContact Tours....yep, must've been a dream. BTW, I never could tell if I was in FWD or AWD. The transitions were seemless.
It's all about tires.
Tires matter a ton, but even using mediocre tires, AWD makes the magic happen while FWD/RWD will leave you stranded in many circumstances. No, it won't help you turn or stop, but it will help you out of the drive way.
No it won't. I would take FWD or RWD with snow tires any day in snow over AWD with all seasons. Again, people do not die because they do not go forward fast enough, but bcs they cannot stop fast enough.
Meh. I've never driven in snow that my tires couldn't handle just fine. Also, when I couldn't deal with it, it was black ice on a steep hill that nothing would have worked on short of a tank ripping into t he asphalt with metal treads.
 
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Originally Posted by Ws6
Meh. I've never driven in snow that my tires couldn't handle just fine. Also, when I couldn't deal with it, it was black ice on a steep hill that nothing would have worked on short of a tank ripping into t he asphalt with metal treads.
I agree. But the snow tire nazis must protest reality.
 
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Originally Posted by edyvw
When you drive 2mph they won't slip. And yeah, probably you are lying. It is tin can after all.
Sacred cows are being slaughtered...... horse
 
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There's been a lot of stupidity in this thread, lately. In deep, sticky, packy snow, AWD with crap tires will leave you with 4 tires spinning in the snow-tire-chock that gets formed. You have to have deep, wide tread to grip in that, just like in gumbo mud. On cold pavement (40f and under), snow tire rubber will stop faster and corner harder than 'all-seasons'. (If you are buying 'summer' tires for extra grip, you're a fool not to buy 'winter' tires, when you need the grip even worse). You won't stop fast enough in snow, with all-season tires. AWD/4WD won't make any difference. Snow tires will help stop you before you run over someone else's child. Or if you don't give a dmn about other people's kids, it'll help prevent that deer from crashing through your windshield, and decapitating you.
 

Ws6

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Originally Posted by bobdoo
There's been a lot of stupidity in this thread, lately. In deep, sticky, packy snow, AWD with crap tires will leave you with 4 tires spinning in the snow-tire-chock that gets formed. You have to have deep, wide tread to grip in that, just like in gumbo mud. On cold pavement (40f and under), snow tire rubber will stop faster and corner harder than 'all-seasons'. (If you are buying 'summer' tires for extra grip, you're a fool not to buy 'winter' tires, when you need the grip even worse). You won't stop fast enough in snow, with all-season tires. AWD/4WD won't make any difference. Snow tires will help stop you before you run over someone else's child. Or if you don't give a dmn about other people's kids, it'll help prevent that deer from crashing through your windshield, and decapitating you.
Dude...noones kids are put playing on the roads I drive in a snow storm. No tire will stop you fast enough to miss a deer that lunges in front of you. Also, my Nokian wrg3s in 10 degree weather could not keep up with any of the all seasons I've used on the same vehicle in the corners. Nor were they any good in the rain. In snow and on ice, I couldn't tell a difference, what little snow I saw with them. All seasons are fine unless you go studded all-out snows, then Id argue there is a real difference.
 
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Originally Posted by y_p_w
Originally Posted by littlehulkster
Hence the need for snow tires. Even the most sophisticated AWD system does nothing at all to help you stop. That said, I find trucks even worse for that sort of thing because the tail wants to come loose due to the massive weight difference. SUVs are a little more balanced.
Honestly probably the best thing for those conditions are chains/cables. But every state seems to have its own rules on when they can be used. Around here I believe it's only for designated chain conditions and they have to come off at the end of a chain-required area. I haven't tried driving with them, but I'm pretty sure that there's a difference between ladder-style radial chains (that lose contact with the chain) and diagonal or other styles where there's always contact with the chain. This guy is trying out chains in Yosemite Valley. He stops on the side and then tries to accelerate back onto the road. It still slips, but eventually digs in every time the chain contacts the road.
Autosocks...... https://youtu.be/WYjIDvSdzHQ https://youtu.be/WtBzXVbE3Rc
 
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There are different types of snow too, just to add to the confusion. Regions that are fairly flat versus hilly ones, etc. The conditions in Colorado or Kansas may be a bit different versus those in Washington or the NE. I've had no problems driving on snow. Whether it's fresh or packed I can get around. The problem are the Yahoos who drive at normal speeds and end up playing bumper pool with everyone else. If you live in a region that has snow for weeks or months then a winter tire makes sense. Another reason is if you go skiing or are traveling through the mountains. For some of us, snow is a one week or even a one day event. This past winter we had snow for around three weeks. Purchasing winter tires for that bit of time is cost prohibitive. If you have the money then by all means that is your prerogative. I have found that for over 40 years of driving I have had no issues with driving on good all season tires. Again it's a three legged stool. A VW awd is no guarantee that you will make it okay. It's the skill of the driver plus the condition of the tires that makes the trip safer. If conditions are such that I drive only 20mph then that is my prerogative as well. If you want to go 50 then by all means go around. It's your neck.
 
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Originally Posted by PimTac
If you live in a region that has snow for weeks or months then a winter tire makes sense. Another reason is if you go skiing or are traveling through the mountains. For some of us, snow is a one week or even a one day event. This past winter we had snow for around three weeks. Purchasing winter tires for that bit of time is cost prohibitive. If you have the money then by all means that is your prerogative. I have found that for over 40 years of driving I have had no issues with driving on good all season tires.
Depends. In a previous post I talked about seeing a car with Oregon plates that had studded winter tires and had traveled to Northern California. I saw a car with a ski rack and Dunlop performance winters. I'm guessing those probably stayed on for the entirety of the winter ski season. And the the oddest was when I took my kid sledding around the Lake Tahoe area - somewhere in Nevada. There was a BMW 328xi with Firestone Winterforce tires. They weren't studded, but they really stood out. I talked the the driver about them, that they weren't exactly a performance tire, that they're inexpensive, and loud. He said yes, but if one really needed to drive in snow/ice they did the job pretty well. The parking lot had a bit of snow that my WRX ( with Pilot Sport A/S 3) handled well enough at low speeds, but the main roads were all bone dry save the occasional patch of snow (like no more than 3 feet across).
 
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Originally Posted by y_p_w
Originally Posted by PimTac
If you live in a region that has snow for weeks or months then a winter tire makes sense. Another reason is if you go skiing or are traveling through the mountains. For some of us, snow is a one week or even a one day event. This past winter we had snow for around three weeks. Purchasing winter tires for that bit of time is cost prohibitive. If you have the money then by all means that is your prerogative. I have found that for over 40 years of driving I have had no issues with driving on good all season tires.
Depends. In a previous post I talked about seeing a car with Oregon plates that had studded winter tires and had traveled to Northern California. I saw a car with a ski rack and Dunlop performance winters. I'm guessing those probably stayed on for the entirety of the winter ski season. And the the oddest was when I took my kid sledding around the Lake Tahoe area - somewhere in Nevada. There was a BMW 328xi with Firestone Winterforce tires. They weren't studded, but they really stood out. I talked the the driver about them, that they weren't exactly a performance tire, that they're inexpensive, and loud. He said yes, but if one really needed to drive in snow/ice they did the job pretty well. The parking lot had a bit of snow that my WRX ( with Pilot Sport A/S 3) handled well enough at low speeds, but the main roads were all bone dry save the occasional patch of snow (like no more than 3 feet across).
Sounds like the driver felt it was better to be safe than sorry. Weather is unpredictable. Even up here. I went to work once in rainy weather and when I got off my 8 hour shift we had over a foot of snow on the ground. Snow was not in the forecast.
 
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Originally Posted by PimTac
There are different types of snow too, just to add to the confusion. Regions that are fairly flat versus hilly ones, etc. The conditions in Colorado or Kansas may be a bit different versus those in Washington or the NE. I've had no problems driving on snow. Whether it's fresh or packed I can get around. The problem are the Yahoos who drive at normal speeds and end up playing bumper pool with everyone else. If you live in a region that has snow for weeks or months then a winter tire makes sense. Another reason is if you go skiing or are traveling through the mountains. For some of us, snow is a one week or even a one day event. This past winter we had snow for around three weeks. Purchasing winter tires for that bit of time is cost prohibitive. If you have the money then by all means that is your prerogative. I have found that for over 40 years of driving I have had no issues with driving on good all season tires. Again it's a three legged stool. A VW awd is no guarantee that you will make it okay. It's the skill of the driver plus the condition of the tires that makes the trip safer. If conditions are such that I drive only 20mph then that is my prerogative as well. If you want to go 50 then by all means go around. It's your neck.
^^^THIS. Well said. I grew up in upstate NY. We NEVER had snow tires, and we were NEVER stuck or stranded at home. We left in 1988. Traction control wasn't even invented yet. All we had were hundreds of pounds of rocks in the bed of the 2WD pickups, and all seasons on the FWD VWs, and a working brain between the ears.
 
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Originally Posted by Brigadier
Originally Posted by PimTac
There are different types of snow too, just to add to the confusion. Regions that are fairly flat versus hilly ones, etc. The conditions in Colorado or Kansas may be a bit different versus those in Washington or the NE. I've had no problems driving on snow. Whether it's fresh or packed I can get around. The problem are the Yahoos who drive at normal speeds and end up playing bumper pool with everyone else. If you live in a region that has snow for weeks or months then a winter tire makes sense. Another reason is if you go skiing or are traveling through the mountains. For some of us, snow is a one week or even a one day event. This past winter we had snow for around three weeks. Purchasing winter tires for that bit of time is cost prohibitive. If you have the money then by all means that is your prerogative. I have found that for over 40 years of driving I have had no issues with driving on good all season tires. Again it's a three legged stool. A VW awd is no guarantee that you will make it okay. It's the skill of the driver plus the condition of the tires that makes the trip safer. If conditions are such that I drive only 20mph then that is my prerogative as well. If you want to go 50 then by all means go around. It's your neck.
^^^THIS. Well said. I grew up in upstate NY. We NEVER had snow tires, and we were NEVER stuck or stranded at home. We left in 1988. Traction control wasn't even invented yet. All we had were hundreds of pounds of rocks in the bed of the 2WD pickups, and all seasons on the FWD VWs, and a working brain between the ears.
Exactly. Even when I had my 4wd pickups, I carried a couple of bags of sand in the back. They helped with the weight distribution. I never used the sand for myself but instead used it to help others get going.
 
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Originally Posted by PimTac
Originally Posted by Brigadier
Originally Posted by PimTac
There are different types of snow too, just to add to the confusion. Regions that are fairly flat versus hilly ones, etc. The conditions in Colorado or Kansas may be a bit different versus those in Washington or the NE. I've had no problems driving on snow. Whether it's fresh or packed I can get around. The problem are the Yahoos who drive at normal speeds and end up playing bumper pool with everyone else. If you live in a region that has snow for weeks or months then a winter tire makes sense. Another reason is if you go skiing or are traveling through the mountains. For some of us, snow is a one week or even a one day event. This past winter we had snow for around three weeks. Purchasing winter tires for that bit of time is cost prohibitive. If you have the money then by all means that is your prerogative. I have found that for over 40 years of driving I have had no issues with driving on good all season tires. Again it's a three legged stool. A VW awd is no guarantee that you will make it okay. It's the skill of the driver plus the condition of the tires that makes the trip safer. If conditions are such that I drive only 20mph then that is my prerogative as well. If you want to go 50 then by all means go around. It's your neck.
^^^THIS. Well said. I grew up in upstate NY. We NEVER had snow tires, and we were NEVER stuck or stranded at home. We left in 1988. Traction control wasn't even invented yet. All we had were hundreds of pounds of rocks in the bed of the 2WD pickups, and all seasons on the FWD VWs, and a working brain between the ears.
Exactly. Even when I had my 4wd pickups, I carried a couple of bags of sand in the back. They helped with the weight distribution. I never used the sand for myself but instead used it to help others get going.
When I had my 4X4 Colorado, every late October, four 60 lb bags of concrete mix were put in the bed over the rear axle. As such, when I put the All-Weather GY DuraTrac AT tires on it, I could pretty much go anywhere in 2WD only. And it pretty much stopped a dime, too.
 
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Originally Posted by Ws6
Originally Posted by bobdoo
There's been a lot of stupidity in this thread, lately. In deep, sticky, packy snow, AWD with crap tires will leave you with 4 tires spinning in the snow-tire-chock that gets formed. You have to have deep, wide tread to grip in that, just like in gumbo mud. On cold pavement (40f and under), snow tire rubber will stop faster and corner harder than 'all-seasons'. (If you are buying 'summer' tires for extra grip, you're a fool not to buy 'winter' tires, when you need the grip even worse). You won't stop fast enough in snow, with all-season tires. AWD/4WD won't make any difference. Snow tires will help stop you before you run over someone else's child. Or if you don't give a dmn about other people's kids, it'll help prevent that deer from crashing through your windshield, and decapitating you.
Dude...noones kids are put playing on the roads I drive in a snow storm. No tire will stop you fast enough to miss a deer that lunges in front of you. Also, my Nokian wrg3s in 10 degree weather could not keep up with any of the all seasons I've used on the same vehicle in the corners. Nor were they any good in the rain. In snow and on ice, I couldn't tell a difference, what little snow I saw with them. All seasons are fine unless you go studded all-out snows, then Id argue there is a real difference.
You felt need to confirm his post?
 
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Originally Posted by littlehulkster
It can be done, I'm sure, but the potential for spinning out or fishtailing is always going to be a lot higher. Your solution seems pretty good, but up here in the mountains a RWD truck just wouldn't cut it, even with snow tires. In the flatlands, you can manage.
In the mountains, I'd certainly consider something different. Here, not so much. wink 4x4 is nice, ground clearance is nice. Most times, if I had to choose one over the other, I'd choose the ground clearance first. Off topic, but years back, that LPG powered LTD I had, you just couldn't get it stuck. Between the way the car was balanced and the lack of power, you could just modulate the throttle perfectly and work your way through darned near everything.
 
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Living in central Alabama, we don't see snow very often. However, we get plenty of rain. I would like to see a CR report or such, comparing various AWD systems on wet roads, to include highway driving, city traffic, hils, curves, etc. We currently have a 2013 CR-V AWD, and have been pleased with it, aside from a VTC actuator replacement. It drives great in rainy weather and other slippery conditions. BTW, a few years ago, we had a GMC Safari AWD van. I used to have fun at stoplights, teasing young guys in sports cars, when the pavement was wet. The light would turn green, and away I would go, while they were slipping and spinning. The looks I got were funny; a VAN beat them off the line!
 
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Originally Posted by Auae85
Living in central Alabama, we don't see snow very often. However, we get plenty of rain. I would like to see a CR report or such, comparing various AWD systems on wet roads, to include highway driving, city traffic, hils, curves, etc. We currently have a 2013 CR-V AWD, and have been pleased with it, aside from a VTC actuator replacement. It drives great in rainy weather and other slippery conditions. BTW, a few years ago, we had a GMC Safari AWD van. I used to have fun at stoplights, teasing young guys in sports cars, when the pavement was wet. The light would turn green, and away I would go, while they were slipping and spinning. The looks I got were funny; a VAN beat them off the line!
For the most part I don't believe that wet weather is as bad for traction as snow or mud, unless there's something seriously wrong about the pavement conditions. In that case good tires matter more than anything else. I do remember having a front-wheel drive car where I had a tendency to slip in wet conditions over a painted stop or crosswalk stripe. I'd hit that strip and my tires would start spinning until I got enough traction. Not a problem with an AWD car since the rear wheels will push me past that stripe.
 
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