Is 10 microns concidered a bypass filter?

Messages
1,414
Location
South Carolina
Is that 95% @ 10 microns or 50%? Micron rating can be used rather loosely. I'm assuming it's 95% @ 10 microns which isn't that great for bypass. The Fram Ultra full flow filters are 94% @ 10 microns. My thoughts on a bypass filter would be 95+% at like 2 microns.
 
Messages
1,414
Location
South Carolina
Originally Posted by Linctex
GENERALLY...... the answer is "no" ( That crosses over to a Napa 1050 https://www.fleetfilter.com/filter/51050.html ) Some of us do.... I figure "every little bit helps". I have the longer version of that filter as my "first bypass" - - (it is actually a Hastings LF334 - same as Baldwin B164, or Fram P3404) The oil then flows from there to a Napa 1749 https://www.fleetfilter.com/filter/51749.html (5 micron nominal rating)
Then look at the Beta Ratio. 2/10=5/14 50% @ 5 microns 90% @ 14 microns The Fram Ultra full flow filter is 80% @ 5 microns. I feel like better filtration would come from just running dual Fram Ultra XG8A filters on a remote mount.
 
Last edited:
Messages
4,846
Location
VA
I was figuring 10 micron filters would be filtering in bypass mode the majority of the time. grin
 

dnewton3

Staff member
Messages
8,459
Location
Indianapolis, IN
Back decades ago, a 10um filter was often used as a BP filter in many applications. Due to the orifice restriction, the flow rate was very low through those filters and so the capture ratio (beta) was "better" than a normal FF filter. My 1987 Escort 2.0L diesel (Mazda engine IIRC) had two filters mounted on one base mount; they sat opposite of each other. Both were FF filters rated about the same beta, but one had an orifice and was the "bypass" filter. (Wix 51324 and 51839)
 
Messages
187
Location
San Antonio,TX
Originally Posted by Gebo
I was figuring 10 micron filters would be filtering in bypass mode the majority of the time. grin
A true bypass filter doesn't ever let anything get around(bypass) its filtering media. There is not a bypass spring in a bypass filter. Every bit of fluid that enters a bypass must go thru its filtering media to get out. 98 to 99 % efficiency @ 10 micros is a good element, like a Fleetguard LF777. So a bypass filter is good at filtering. What it is not good at is flowing. The LF777 is rated at only 2 gpm as an example.
 
Messages
2,401
Location
pa
todays tea cup filters are just OK, but at least adding a bigger remote mount would be good since many vehicles dont rust thru as fast + last longer. my fully galvanized body panels in my traded 2001 Jetta had only a little surface rust where the "mud flaps" were, thats 10 years + 200 thou of Pa salty roads!!
 
Messages
88
Location
USA
These appear to be nominal ratings rather than absolute. This means that efficiency is probably low.
 
Messages
10,000
Location
Waco, TX
These appear to be nominal ratings rather than absolute. This means that efficiency is probably low.
I received two emails from CLARCOR (Parker filtration)
1) from Travis R. Winberg that says Baldwin and Hastings are exactly the same filter.
2) from Sandra "Sandy" Huckfeldt that says: "2 micron nominal, 15 micron absolute"
 
Messages
553
Location
Caldwell Idaho
Old post but this unit is is a bypass filter because I looked it up in the cross reference and it is a match for the Clark forklift filter 990936 which fits on the Clark C500 series that have a Continental flat head engine or a Wakesha over head valve engine [depending on the forklift size] lots of old vehicles were fitted with these bypass filters not as the present day sell of ultra fine filtration, but to add a filter to an engine that did not have full flow filtration. The newer Forklifts have full flow automotive engines and had double the life of the engines that were equipped with a bypass filter.
 
Top