Impulse Buy

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I don't normally buy on impulse, especially when it comes to guns. But last night I made a rare exception. I took a quick trip to Sportsman's Warehouse near me to pick up some patches and other gun cleaning supplies I was running low on. As I was browsing the gun rack I saw this beautiful Remington Model 7600 Pump Action 200th Anniversary Edition in .30-06 sitting there. I asked to see it. The nice young kid behind the counter handed it to me, and the rifle was absolutely gorgeous! The Walnut was some of the best I've ever seen on ANY rifle at any cost. Both the butt stock, as well as the forend had what seemed to be endless figure and contrast, coupled with a beautiful high gloss finish. The bluing was very well done, with a very high luster and polish throughout. The gold inlays showed very nice detail on both sides of the receiver, as well as on the pistol grip cap. There is a nice gold inlayed barrel band at the muzzle. The fit and finish of all the wood and metal was as good as it could be. I had seen several of these 200th Anniversary Edition Remington's at Cabela's over the last year and a half. And I almost sprung for a 7600 they had. But I just couldn't justify the price, ($1,595.00), they were asking. It's not the gun wasn't worth it. It was. But it's a lot for a gun that's a safe queen, and you're basically buying to admire, and not to run up a high round count on. So when I asked this kid how much, I just about fell over when he told me $899.00! I said are you sure? He double checked, and came back with the manager and said yes, they were on a special clearance. I couldn't say, "I'll TAKE IT", fast enough! For that price there is just no way I was going to leave without it. When my wife saw it, she was impressed as well. It's just a beautiful rifle. Remington sure did a nice job on it, I'll say that. This is just a quick and dirty phone pic.

Remingto 7600 200th Anniversary Model 003.jpg
 
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That is a really fine looking rifle and well bought. Sometimes, when you run across what you know to be a real deal or even steal for something that you'd really like to have, you just have to take the plunge. I'd bet that you would have regretted not having bought it had you waited a couple of days and then gone back to find that there were none left available.
 
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It's not a high grade gun like the OP but 200th Anniversary 700 .243 I picked up last year on clearance had a nice piece of wood. The dull metal finish wasn't very attractive so I sold it off. The boy I sold it to has been happy with it.
 
Very nice. I have it's grandfather and great-great grandfather in the safe. A 760 in 30.06 my grandpa bought for me when I turned 16 and his Model 141 in .35 Remington. Pump guns are popular in the Pa woods as noted. My 760 shot several truck loads of Pa deer but I have little use for it in Az. It's not all that pleasant to shoot. What will you do with it?
 
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Originally Posted by fdcg27
That is a really fine looking rifle and well bought. Sometimes, when you run across what you know to be a real deal or even steal for something that you'd really like to have, you just have to take the plunge. I'd bet that you would have regretted not having bought it had you waited a couple of days and then gone back to find that there were none left available.
I know for sure I would have regretted not buying it. Especially for that price. I have found over the years you have to be careful with, "eye candy" rifles and pistols. Namely Commemorative's and Anniversary Edition guns. Because it is very easy to overpay for them. Generally, (but not always), the worst time to buy these type of guns is when they are first introduced. Because they are usually priced the highest at that point. Most, (but again not all), of these type of guns tend to be over produced. The Remington 200th Anniversary Edition guns have 2,016 of each manufactured. To commemorate the end date of Remington's Bicentennial. These guns rarely sell out fast because, 1.) They're generally expensive in relation to the standard models of the same gun. And 2.) They tend to be somewhat over produced for what is usually a somewhat limited market. I saw these things everywhere on places like Gun Broker, Bud's, and Cabela's, for $1,599.00 to $1,799.00 when they were first introduced in 2016. In this case it paid to wait, as the price came down almost 50% in just 3 years. The downside to waiting is the guns could sell out. Then you're out of luck. So it becomes a bit of a gamble. One of the best examples you have of these type of guns, were all of the Winchester Model 94 Commemorative's that were produced in the 70's. They produced literally dozens of different one's. Commemorating just about everyone and everything that had anything to do with the old west. From Crazy Horse to the Golden Spike in the Transcontinental Railroad. Some of these guns were produced in the tens of thousands. And came packaged in brightly colored boxes in printed sleeves. (They're worth more today if you have all of the original packaging). You could pick them up for a song by the late 70's and early 80's when all the interest petered out. Some went up in value, like the John Wayne Commemorative Models. But they were priced much higher, and were produced in much smaller numbers. Many were available in odd calibers like .38-55 Winchester, and Winchester made special runs of ammunition to go along with them in equally colorful boxes. The guns became inexpensive enough that people were buying them for shooters, because some models were priced just slightly higher than the standard production 94's were. That was another gun I almost bought, but didn't. I didn't want that to happen this time.
 
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Originally Posted by billt460
The Walnut was some of the best I've ever seen on ANY rifle at any cost.
The walnut was the first thing I noticed. Very beautiful. On a side note, just think of how many cruise vacations you could have purchased! hornets
 
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Originally Posted by dlundblad
Originally Posted by billt460
The Walnut was some of the best I've ever seen on ANY rifle at any cost.
The walnut was the first thing I noticed. Very beautiful. On a side note, just think of how many cruise vacations you could have purchased! hornets
No doubt. $899.00 buys a lot of diarrhea. grin2
 
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Originally Posted by AZjeff
....... Pump guns are popular in the Pa woods as noted. My 760 shot several truck loads of Pa deer but I have little use for it in Az.
Originally Posted by ammolab
Used to be..and still is very popular for big game in Pennsylvania, no semi autos allowed for big game.
I remember reading somewhere, and I don't know how true it is, that over 65% of the Remington 7600 series of pump action rifles ever sold, have been sold in the state of Pennsylvania.
 
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Pump action shotguns are famous, but I don't hear about rifles with that type of action too often. Is there a downside for a pump compared to bolt action? I would imagine the pump is faster for most shooters, but I've seen good shooters operate a bolt pretty darned quickly. Great looking rifle...nice buy!
 
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Originally Posted by Virtus_Probi
Pump action shotguns are famous, but I don't hear about rifles with that type of action too often. Is there a downside for a pump compared to bolt action? I would imagine the pump is faster for most shooters, but I've seen good shooters operate a bolt pretty darned quickly. Great looking rifle...nice buy!
A pump action rifle like the Remington 7600 series, is in essence a bolt action. The only difference is forward and rearward pressure on the forend rotates the bolt, instead of the bolt handle. The downside is a pump action doesn't produce the camming leverage like a true bolt action can. So on a conventional bolt action firing a hot load, the shooter might encounter a slightly harder than normal bolt lift, that would lock up a pump action with the same load. With a pump action, (or lever actuated bolt action like a Browning BLR, or a Winchester Model 88), you want to stay away from hot handloads, or "Light Magnum" factory loads. And you want to keep the chamber clean, and the bolt lugs well greased. That will help to insure trouble free, smooth operation. My rifle came with a chamber brush pre bent on an angle to brush out the chamber through the ejection port every few rounds. My Remington 7400 semi auto came with the same thing. Dirty chambers in these rifles can cause cases to stick, and make cycling the action difficult. They run fine if you keep them clean, lubricated, and feed it the ammunition the gun was designed to operate around. And it is imperative if you shoot handloads of any kind, that you full length resize the brass. And be sure to bump back the shoulder far enough to allow easy bolt lock up without having to force anything.
 
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That is flat gorgeous. Nice find indeed. I had a 7600 in .270 once, and another in 6mm Remington I think, but of course I let them get away. Dumb.
 
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I have the 150th anniversary model 7600 (1966). It was my Dad's and I used it to hunt deer in Pennsylvania after he quit with it. Quite a upgrade from a Winchester 30-30. It is still a beautiful gun and it's been in the snow, rain and killed alot of deer. I think you will be very happy with it.
 
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