How to stop drain plug drips / seepage

Messages
589
Location
Joplin
Thread starter
I like cars that don't drip fluids and try and keep mine that way. I seem to have the most problem recently at the oil drain plugs where I'm getting minor drips from both of my cars. I changed the gasket last oil change thinking the old one looked about worn out. The old one never leaked. I used the same gasket material to make a new gasket and it didn't leak for a month but now has started. Yes, I've tried to retorque but it hasn't helped and cleaned the flange area on mating surface of plug and oil pan. In the past I've tried both aftermarket copper and nylon washers and they were much worse than the gaskets that I made myself. Has anyone got any suggestions on what has worked for them? I'm considering trying just a large O ring from the hardwares stores. If the nitrle material on the hand-tighten filter gasket can be leak free why not at the darn drain plug when I put 20 or more ft. lbs. on it? [Bang Head]
 
Messages
352
Location
Ontario, Canada.
....Never had any problem in any vehicle with leaks at the drain plug. Toyota recommends replacement of the gasket at every oil change. I'm still using the original in my 98 Tacoma. Is there a chance that you are over torquing the plug? That is worse than too little torque as it flattens and distorts the sealing area. I'm assuming that you've tried an OEM gasket but if not that is what I'd do. As you said, the old gasket worked fine!! I did buy an aftermarket drain plug gasket for my classic Mustang which is working ok. It has copper around the outside and a rubber material on the inner area where it seals against the plug.
 
Messages
1,902
Location
cali
..i thought it was my plug, but it was my threads on the oil pan that were slightly damaged. so now i tighten it a little harder but not alot...in a few years ill have to replace the pan cause of the bad threads.
 
Messages
3,203
Location
Southeastern, PA
I'd think twice about using an o-ring, it would really need a groove to capture it. An o-ring between two flat surfaces would not allow you to tighten the drain plug properly. When you tighten the drain plug enough to keep it from loosening, the o-ring would squeeze right out. The drain plug gaskets that have a metal outer ring and a molded on rubber seal on the inside diameter seem to work well. I've had good luck with them. [ April 11, 2003, 08:02 PM: Message edited by: Rick in PA ]
 
Messages
874
Location
Pacific NW
drifter, my remark was only to suggest that sometimes, when the drain plug seems to be leaking, in fact it's only the lowest point and the source is somewhere higher on the engine.
 
Messages
1,902
Location
cali
quote:
Originally posted by OneQuartLow: drifter, my remark was only to suggest that sometimes, when the drain plug seems to be leaking, in fact it's only the lowest point and the source is somewhere higher on the engine.
o gosh thanks for clairifying. see i miss things like this if i get only 2 hours of sleep. point taken, sorrie.
 
Messages
589
Location
Joplin
Thread starter
quote:
Originally posted by Rick in PA: I'd think twice about using an o-ring, it would really need a groove to capture it. An o-ring between two flat surfaces would not allow you to tighten the drain plug properly. When you tighten the drain plug enough to keep it from loosening, the o-ring would squeeze right out. The drain plug gaskets that have a metal outer ring and a molded on rubber seal on the inside diameter seem to work well. I've had good luck with them.
Probably good advice about the O rings squeezing out. I've never seen the gasket with a metal outer ring and rubber seal. Do you or anyone recall where these are being purchased at? I'd like to try one of these since I've tried so many other things
 
Messages
3,203
Location
Southeastern, PA
quote:
Originally posted by Cressida: Probably good advice about the O rings squeezing out. I've never seen the gasket with a metal outer ring and rubber seal. Do you or anyone recall where these are being purchased at? I'd like to try one of these since I've tried so many other things
I got one at Pep Boys, I suspect most auto parts stores would carry them. The brand was Motormite, the product line was Oil-Tite. There was a full selection of drainplugs, gaskets and whatnot. It was in the oil section.
 
Messages
401
Location
Southcentral PA
I had this problem too, leaking oil plug and damaged threads on a used car I bought. My solution was to install a Fram Sure Drain, and instead of using the provided copper gasket, I used a ribbed nylon washer and a liquid-gasket product (Hondabond) that is made for oil environments. I put it on the threads and on both sides of the washer. I drained the oil really well and cleaned the threads on the pan with brake cleaner. When I tightened the plug, I stopped well short of what's recommended to crush a copper washer. So far, no leaks at all. This saved me buying an oil pan, I can change the oil all I want and not worry about more thread damage or leaks. The Fumoto drain valve would be another option. It's provided with a high quality gasket material that also doesn't require high torque to crush. However, the threads are made of brass, which aren't as tolerant to boogered threads. [ April 12, 2003, 08:04 PM: Message edited by: S2000driver ]
 
Messages
1,527
Location
Southeast United States
I haven't tried the Sure-Drain yet, but I have had the Fumoto on all my vehicles for the last several years. If you once try one of these valves, you'll never go back to wrenching drain plugs. My fix would be the same as S2000's. Use sealer on a drain valve and forget it.....
 
Top