Group IV/V confirmed gear oils?

Good luck finding that... is there a reason why you're interested in specific groups? That alone won't guarantee "better" performance or protection. If you're interested in the best performance, most discussions IIRC have always gone back to the MIL SPEC 2105E/ SAE J2360 as being the granddaddy of them all... basically, if your gear oil meets this, it's the cream of the crop. Maybe I'm wrong.
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MIL-PRF-2105E this specification released in 1995 combines the performance requirements of its predecessor (MIL-L-2105D) and API MT-1. MIL-PRF-2105E maintains all existing chemical/physical requirements, stationary axle test requirements, field test requirements and data review by the Lubricants Review Institute that were required under MIL-L-2105D. It also adds the stringent oil seal compatibility and thermal durability test requirements under API MT-1. MIL-PRF-2105E has been re-written as SAE Standard J2360. SAE J2360 standard is a new global quality standard that defines a level of performance equivalent to that defined by MIL-PRF-2105E, a U.S. military standard for approval that was not available to oil blenders in all parts of the world. It includes all of the most recent axle and transmission testing requirements identified in API GL-5, API MT-1, and MIL-PRF-2105E including the need to demonstrate proof-of-performance through rigorous field testing.
 
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PCGO standard service do well using napthenic base stocks. They show high volaitilty v. paraffins or higher groups. If you are in motorsports road racing you might want something that can handles the extremely high heat generated better tan the above. Never looked into it. This Not going to happen even in aggressive street driving, I haven't looked into extreme cold gear oils either. But During a 30K service The chep-out NIssan dealer put some 80W80 HD mobilube in the rear and X-axle and I notice that it didnt work in the winter compared to factory so I put inexpensive Supertech 75W90 in and it was back to good.
 
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In Canada, specifically Saskatchewan, has Federated Co-op gear oils. They make a conventional but use group 4 for their synthetic versions. 75w90 and 80w140. They are advertised 100% group 4. Made at the Regina refinery. The 90 weight is available in 5 litre jugs and bigger but the 140 starts at 20 litre pails. A few years back I picked up a 20 liter pail of the 140 and paid about 180 bucks all in. The 90 weight was cheaper yet per litre. It held the zf 9.25 in my 2011 ram 1500 together for years of heavy towing. Its doi g what is supposed to in my 11.5 AAM as well.
 
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Originally Posted by SubieRubyRoo
Good luck finding that... is there a reason why you're interested in specific groups? That alone won't guarantee "better" performance or protection. If you're interested in the best performance, most discussions IIRC have always gone back to the MIL SPEC 2105E/ SAE J2360 as being the granddaddy of them all... basically, if your gear oil meets this, it's the cream of the crop. Maybe I'm wrong.
Quote
MIL-PRF-2105E this specification released in 1995 combines the performance requirements of its predecessor (MIL-L-2105D) and API MT-1. MIL-PRF-2105E maintains all existing chemical/physical requirements, stationary axle test requirements, field test requirements and data review by the Lubricants Review Institute that were required under MIL-L-2105D. It also adds the stringent oil seal compatibility and thermal durability test requirements under API MT-1. MIL-PRF-2105E has been re-written as SAE Standard J2360. SAE J2360 standard is a new global quality standard that defines a level of performance equivalent to that defined by MIL-PRF-2105E, a U.S. military standard for approval that was not available to oil blenders in all parts of the world. It includes all of the most recent axle and transmission testing requirements identified in API GL-5, API MT-1, and MIL-PRF-2105E including the need to demonstrate proof-of-performance through rigorous field testing.
MIL-PRF-2105E has been cancelled by the military since 2005. SAE J2360 is its replacement.
 
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Also, a company can claim to meet MIL-PRF-2105E. It means nothing if it wasn't on the latest revision of the Qualified Products List (QPL-2105). The US Army did the testing to conform whether a product meets the specification to be included in the QPL. It's just like the Amsoil "Meets or Exceed" line they pioneered.
 
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Thread starter
The application would be the Ford PTU (which uses 75W-140). But there's only 10-20 oz of fluid sitting over hot catalytic converters and is spinning a driveshaft the entire time. I read an article that said that Group IV or V base stocks would be the best for this amount of heat due to the ester content.
 
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Originally Posted by UG_Passat
Also, a company can claim to meet MIL-PRF-2105E. It means nothing if it wasn't on the latest revision of the Qualified Products List (QPL-2105). The US Army did the testing to conform whether a product meets the specification to be included in the QPL. It's just like the Amsoil "Meets or Exceed" line they pioneered.
Meets or Exceeds is legitimate language, AMSOIL's verbiage was "Suitable for use where xxx is called for" or "Use AMSOIL Signature Series Synthetic Motor Oil in applications that require any of the following specifications:" whereas Mobil 1 EP for example "Mobil 1 Extended Performance 5W-20 synthetic motor oil meets or exceeds the requirements of:" followed by API, ILSAC, Ford...etc.
 
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Neo synthetics is the antithesis to Amsoil in terms of advertising and keeping their website up to date. However, I have read good things about their gear oils over the years and suspect they use top tier synthetic oils when formulating them.
 
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