GM 2.8 Diesel Canyon MIL: p244c and p24a0

Messages
1,415
Location
Alaska
I second the fuel gelling possibility. Although fuel stations in Alaska and I hope Canada sell #1 fuel in the winter (in Alaska it's actually Jet A-50), most dealers in the lower 48 even the northern tier sell #2 and the purchaser has to deal with it. If they have a #1 pump it is usually specifically labeled. BTW driving 80mph on a "potentially icy" road at night in deer country isn't the best idea.
 
Messages
6,710
Location
SE British Columbia, Canada
I won't vote for fuel gelling unless they picked up up a bad batch some where. They drove through Edmonton when it was -30 F. Minus 14 is a Cake walk. Did they fuel up at Shelby? Bet they did. -14 F is at the bottom edge of normal temperatures for Shelby.
 
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Messages
2,611
Location
San Rafael, CA
Thread starter
Well I guess it's easy enough to check if it's gelled? Just pull the fuel filter out? We have a spare new one anyway. Only problem is it's currently at a GM dealer... that won't even touch it til Monday. We'll try to get over there and mess with it without them noticing. Is it possible it could gel if we last fuelled up in Alberta? Ever since we fuelled up we had it running, but we did shut it off at the restaurant where we had dinner. Maybe 45 minutes? And then drove for about 15-20 mins afterward before it hiccuped a couple times then died.
 
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Messages
6
Location
Alberta
I'm wondering if you have some ice in your fuel water separator? I never trust the sensors in mine and always drain the canister every so often.
 
Messages
1,385
Location
RI
With all the problems with this truck on the road trip I'd be trading it in as soon as I got back.
 
Messages
6,710
Location
SE British Columbia, Canada
Yeah, but there are all extraordinary low temps. They are headed for California. smile There about to see a 32 degree F rise in temperature in 24 hours. We see this in Alberta all the time.
 
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Messages
446
Location
California
Originally Posted by mattd
With all the problems with this truck on the road trip I'd be trading it in as soon as I got back.
I have a 2017 GMC Canyon CCLB 2.8 and I love it. Never had a problem in 30k miles. The liability with this vehicle and all other modern diesels is the emissions system. I would not plan a trip like this without taking precautions on a stock vehicle. -insulate DEF tank or add supplementary heating -insulate downpipe to DPF -proper off-road AT tires like Duratracs or Geolander -fill and maintain tank concentration with fuel improver/anti-gel additive. -install factory block heater -fill sump with appropriate 0w30 or 0w40 diesel oil All these above at the very minimum. It seems like this trip was poorly planned and they underestimated the effect of the extreme cold would have on the truck.
 
Messages
6,710
Location
SE British Columbia, Canada
Originally Posted by CleverUserName
Originally Posted by mattd
With all the problems with this truck on the road trip I'd be trading it in as soon as I got back.
I have a 2017 GMC Canyon CCLB 2.8 and I love it. Never had a problem in 30k miles. The liability with this vehicle and all other modern diesels is the emissions system. I would not plan a trip like this without taking precautions on a stock vehicle. -insulate DEF tank or add supplementary heating -insulate downpipe to DPF -proper off-road AT tires like Duratracs or Geolander -fill and maintain tank concentration with fuel improver/anti-gel additive. -install factory block heater -fill sump with appropriate 0w30 or 0w40 diesel oil All these above at the very minimum. It seems like this trip was poorly planned and they underestimated the effect of the extreme cold would have on the truck.
Hey Clever, I thought they were well prepared, it's just that they would have done better with a gas engine. smile
 
Messages
2,611
Location
San Rafael, CA
Thread starter
We tried some powerservice911... Poured it into new fuel filters and the rest in the tank. No luck. My scantool says the commanded fuel pressure is around 32000inhg while the actual fuel pressure never got above 180inhg. Sooo?
 
Messages
2,611
Location
San Rafael, CA
Thread starter
Originally Posted by Snagglefoot
Originally Posted by CleverUserName
Originally Posted by mattd
With all the problems with this truck on the road trip I'd be trading it in as soon as I got back.
I have a 2017 GMC Canyon CCLB 2.8 and I love it. Never had a problem in 30k miles. The liability with this vehicle and all other modern diesels is the emissions system. I would not plan a trip like this without taking precautions on a stock vehicle. -insulate DEF tank or add supplementary heating -insulate downpipe to DPF -proper off-road AT tires like Duratracs or Geolander -fill and maintain tank concentration with fuel improver/anti-gel additive. -install factory block heater -fill sump with appropriate 0w30 or 0w40 diesel oil All these above at the very minimum. It seems like this trip was poorly planned and they underestimated the effect of the extreme cold would have on the truck.
Hey Clever, I thought they were well prepared, it's just that they would have done better with a gas engine. smile
We were plenty prepared, this truck is just a piece of crap.
 
Messages
1,385
Location
RI
Originally Posted by dogememe
We tried some powerservice911... Poured it into new fuel filters and the rest in the tank. No luck. My scantool says the commanded fuel pressure is around 32000inhg while the actual fuel pressure never got above 180inhg. Sooo?
If the fuel isn't gelled, and you did get some fuel with water in it, and that's what caused your low fuel pressure(bad fuel) then it's possible the injection pump failed with the possibility of complete fuel system contamination. A repair that is unfortunately common with common rail diesels with CP3/CP4 pumps, is expensive to repair and not covered under warranty.
 
Messages
446
Location
California
Originally Posted by mattd
Originally Posted by dogememe
We tried some powerservice911... Poured it into new fuel filters and the rest in the tank. No luck. My scantool says the commanded fuel pressure is around 32000inhg while the actual fuel pressure never got above 180inhg. Sooo?
If the fuel isn't gelled, and you did get some fuel with water in it, and that's what caused your low fuel pressure(bad fuel) then it's possible the injection pump failed with the possibility of complete fuel system contamination. A repair that is unfortunately common with common rail diesels with CP3/CP4 pumps, is expensive to repair and not covered under warranty.
These trucks don't have a Bosch fuel system so no CP3/4 to worry about. The fuel filter assembly is usually very effective at removing water and will trigger a warning in the DIC for contamination if it happens.
 
Messages
446
Location
California
Originally Posted by dogememe
Originally Posted by Snagglefoot
Originally Posted by CleverUserName
Originally Posted by mattd
With all the problems with this truck on the road trip I'd be trading it in as soon as I got back.
I have a 2017 GMC Canyon CCLB 2.8 and I love it. Never had a problem in 30k miles. The liability with this vehicle and all other modern diesels is the emissions system. I would not plan a trip like this without taking precautions on a stock vehicle. -insulate DEF tank or add supplementary heating -insulate downpipe to DPF -proper off-road AT tires like Duratracs or Geolander -fill and maintain tank concentration with fuel improver/anti-gel additive. -install factory block heater -fill sump with appropriate 0w30 or 0w40 diesel oil All these above at the very minimum. It seems like this trip was poorly planned and they underestimated the effect of the extreme cold would have on the truck.
Hey Clever, I thought they were well prepared, it's just that they would have done better with a gas engine. smile
We were plenty prepared, this truck is just a piece of crap.
You and I have different interpretations of the word "prepared". You did not heed my warnings about insulation of the emissions system components prior to your departure, as expected you had issues. I can tell you my 2.8 Canyon has been flawless however I would never take it to Alaska without performing the work listed above. It's a gamble and I don't like the odds.
 
Messages
446
Location
California
Originally Posted by mattd
So what style injection system does it have?
Both the 2.8 and LP5 both use Denso HPCR units and there have been very few reported issues with them.
 
Messages
1,385
Location
RI
Really any common rail injection pump is susceptible to this failure due to the design. The fuel is its source of its lubrication. Poor quality or low supply pressure, poor lubrication which will result in pump failure.
 
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Messages
1,212
Location
Sask, Canada
See that's the thing, on the outside it appears to be gelling related but most, if not ever place I have bought diesel at runs winter blend. Most of us on the prairies only carry some antigel in the cab for an emergency but never actually need to add any. Best I can think is he got poor fuel from an underground tank.
 
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