Garage high humidity floor wet vehicle inside.

Messages
725
Location
Northeastern Vermont
Days when humidity is high (summer or winter) my garage floor will be wet and my 2010 Mountaineer will have beads of water in the body but not always depends how high the humidity is. My concern are is moisture getting inside the running gear -frame-door and fender panels. Always garaged never driven in the winter. Just did front and rear differential fluid change and all looked good not milky. I see no water droplets in the oil dip stick. Your opinion would be appreciated.
 
Messages
380
Location
Minnesota
I run a dehumidifier in my extra garage through the summer months. I don't open the doors very often and it stays very comfortable throughout the summer. I am insulated very well also.
 
Messages
725
Location
Northeastern Vermont
Keeping garage door open or closed makes no difference. Open the 2 windows no change. Using a box can does help but takes a long time to dry out.I Using the box fan before it gets wet helps but it will eventually get wet. It's a one car garage.
 
Messages
35,728
Location
ME
Originally Posted by Fitter30
Slab gets wet because it's cooler than the dew point. Garage must be very well insulated to keep slab cooler than dew point.
It's the way my house is, too. Just sucks. Cold comes out of the ground. Garage is uninsulated and has semi-open soffits, but the cold concrete trumps all of that. I could run the dehumidifier 24/7 but the electric bill would be worse than the rust on my tools and vehicles. Inside your axles is probably safe-- I'd worry about the floor pans and brake lines. In winter, if I were you, I'd consider parking outside during the freeze/thaw cycles with high humidity. Only inside for snow prep and real cold snaps (under 10'F). There's more of a breeze under the car outside vs in a clammy dank garage. And salt is worse at the freezing point vs dry crystals at 10'F.
 
Messages
1,425
Location
iowa
I also have been running a dehumidifier when it is really humid for over 20 years in my garage. I just keep it close up, things don't rust, and it almost feels like it's air conditioned when it is hot, and muggy out. I also keep frozen cars covered in snow and ice outside in the winter to keep the moisture under control. I do not ever get any rust on all of the bare steel I have laying around, or my precious tools, and cars.
 
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Messages
725
Location
Northeastern Vermont
Some good advice. Winter is worse then summer believe it or not. I think I will put it outside in the winter when humidity is high. Vehicle has never seen a salt road. I did coat all the brake lines with fluid film. Vehicle is 100% rust free (so far)
 
Messages
4,658
Location
Suburban Washington DC
Originally Posted by littleant
My concern are is moisture getting inside the running gear -frame-door and fender panels.
Running gear is coated in oil so no problem. As long as the frame door and fenders have solid paint, no problem either. I'd be more concerned with mold on the interior. I've had a few cars with all the plastic and vinyl covered in green fuzz after a few months.
 
Messages
13,613
Location
...
You still need to get some ventilation in that garage. It's not just your vehicles that are getting damp.
 
Messages
655
Location
New Hampshire USA
Had this problem in the barn. turned out to be a high ground water. Fortunately the ground slopes away out back so a perimeter drain installed about 4 feet down took care of most of the problem. Wet weather in Dec will still cause moisture on the inside of windows and tools like drill press etc.
 
Messages
299
Location
Detroit
I dealt with a similar issue. My summer camping vehicle is stored in my garage over winter. Last year's winter, the brake disks were covered in rust. Worse yet, rust had creeped all over the vehicle, the valve cover, random nuts and bolts. I was so disappointed. My spotless camper car was showing its first signs of rust. I tackled the issue here on BITOG. With the help of forum input, I determined it was due to condensation of cold bare metal with warm humid air. So all exposed metal was rusting. The solution? I thought about dehumidifiers, but the garage isn't sealed. I considered leaving the daily driven car outside the garage, but that sure isn't worth it in the peak of winter. Turns out the solution was something called Car Jacket. It's basically a sealed tarp cover. You drive the clean, dry vehicle on top the jacket, then wrap and zipper up the entire thing, like a bubble. You throw in some carbon bags to absorb any residual moisture and lock it up. I was absolutely ecstatic with the results. After 6 months of storage, the brake calipers were EXACTLY the way I left them. Tiny little rust spots from washing the car. The car Jacket is the ultimate car storage solution to prevent moisture damage without outrageous electric bills.
 
Messages
3,283
Location
On another site
Originally Posted by littleant
Some good advice. Winter is worse then summer believe it or not. I think I will put it outside in the winter when humidity is high. Vehicle has never seen a salt road. I did coat all the brake lines with fluid film. Vehicle is 100% rust free (so far)
You could try a window air conditioner for summer, and install a gas heater for the winter. Both will help mitigate moisture.
 
Messages
6,748
Location
Lake Havasu City, Arizona
I had this problem with my first house back in Illinois, that had a older stand alone, unattached 2 car garage. On cold, humid, foggy days my vehicles, motorcycles, and even my tool boxes would have moisture and condensation all over them. Along with a wet floor. It's not an easy problem to solve. Both heat and air circulation are the answer. The problem is it is pointless to do either unless you insulate the walls and door first. And that isn't cheap, fast, or easy to do. I tried fans and portable electric heaters with little to no effect. I finally got fed up, called a contractor and told him my problem. The answer was to insulate the walls, and replace the aging, non insulated wooden garage door with a metal insulated one. And install a couple of ceiling fans. Nothing fancy, but something to keep the air circulating. He also ran a gas line from the meter to the garage, and installed a natural gas heater on a thermostat. It solved the problem, albeit expensively. But it was either that, or else live with a garage that was offering no more protection than if I left everything out in the weather. The lesson I learned was two fold. One, it's always better to live in a dryer climate. And two, if you can't, never buy an older home in a temperate climate with an old, unattached garage.
 
Messages
725
Location
Northeastern Vermont
Garage was built in 1960. Open rafters. No insulation. No idea if there is a vapor barrier under concrete floor. Owned the property for 30 years. I have a welder- battery charger that show no rust. BUT every nail-hook that I hang stuff from show surface rust. As most have said air circulation is the problen. The garage is tucked in the woods and only the front (garage door ) is unobstructed. Back and sides have tree's about 20 to 30 feet away.
 
Messages
6,748
Location
Lake Havasu City, Arizona
Originally Posted by littleant
Garage was built in 1960. Open rafters. No insulation.
That's pretty much what mine was. (Only built in 1956). The picture shows the old wooden doors that were replaced. [Linked Image]
 
Messages
725
Location
Northeastern Vermont
Originally Posted by billt460
Originally Posted by littleant
Garage was built in 1960. Open rafters. No insulation.
That's pretty much what mine was. (Only built in 1956). The picture shows the old wooden doors that were replaced. [Linked Image]
The heck with the garage NICE BOAT
 
Messages
6,841
Location
MIchigan
Originally Posted by billt460
The answer was to insulate the walls, and replace the aging, non insulated wooden garage door with a metal insulated one.
Does the insulation keep the moisture out ? I was thinking maybe OP's problem was moisture from the garage floor.
 
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