Current Honda Factory Fill

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4,353
Location
FL
Recently purchased a 2020 Civic. I remember it used to be said that Honda factory fill was "special" because it had a lot of moly in it because it was either part of the add pack or as a result of the assembly lube at the factory. Is that still the case? How long should I keep the break-in oil? I did the first oci on my '16 Fiesta ST within the first 900 miles and another one 1000 miles after that. Thought it was excessive at first, but the first UOA I did on it pretty early on showed no remaining break-in wear metals. I plan on following the OLM after break-in on the Civic.
 
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1,675
Location
WA
Originally Posted by Triple_Se7en
You will get opinions on 1K to 10K OCIs. I'm split in the middle at 5K.
I like your 5K idea. My car was 10K and in the OM break-in paragraph/page never mentioned any early oil change ... Our other new (2014) car same thing ... change at 6500 or 7500. I've heard about moly in most if not all Japanese engines and one very experienced master mechanic told me not to drain the factory fill too quickly. Filter will catch the stuff in any. That's why I like the 5K.
 
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662
Location
South Carolina
I dont think it will hurt anything to change oil early/often or to wait until the OLM tells you to change it, as long as you use the correct viscosity. Do which ever makes you feel warm and fuzzy. I waited for the OLM from day 1 through year 3 on my '12 Odyssey and it runs like new at 105k. Now that i tow with it I do 5k even though it would probably be fine to wait for the OLM.
 
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1,895
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Somewhere in time
Read your owner's manual. In the past, Honda has had an explicit statement about not changing the oil from the factory fill until the OLM states to do so.
 

Bud

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2,801
Location
Texas
Don't know what your 2020 owners manual says, but when I bought my Pilot new the manual said leave the factory oil in until the olm told you to change or one year whichever came first. I would follow the owners manual on a new car, not someone's opinion.
 
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432
Location
AZ
just fallow the OLM, it's set very conservative anyhow. my oil in my accord is always in great shape when changed at 20% usually around the 9000 miles mark. Blackstone tells me it's good for another 2500 easy. i also went to 5/30 over the 0/20. and i use Supertech synthetic. and mobile 1 filters.
 
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15,226
Location
N.H, U.S.A.
Not again.! Every Month a thread when should I do the first OCI smile smile smile Anything under 2K is too early and anything over 5K is too long Somehere in the middle. On the short end if you drive less miles/day on the long end if you drive many miles a day. Then there is the new "keep the oil in and change the filter camp with a light topoff" At least that would prevent the big chunks of casting flash and machining curly-fries from getting let loose during a filter bypass waashout event.
 
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197
Location
Memphis TN
The last honda engine I did own a 2014 4cyl,I sent the oil in for evaluation and it was showing high aluminum which means it was eating itself so I sold it
 
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1,948
Location
.
Honda's factory fill is ordinary, but molybdenum is used in assembly lines and washes into the oil. Honda seems to believe this is helpful for a good break-in because the molybdenum keeps hot spots from forming on new cylinder walls, coking oil and preventing a good seal from forming. So that's the case for a long first interval. On the other hand, if you look at Civic forums or around here, you'll find the Honda 1.5T engine is one of the worst for fuel dilution of engine oil. Admittedly, we don't know how if this is truly harmful, but it's at least an argument for a shorter oil change interval. For my last new Honda engine, I ran the factory fill to about 5k. The replacement oil was Idemitsu with Moly, which seemed to provide some of the break-in benefits Honda was looking for. After that, I switched to Mobil1. Before you take Honda's Maintenance Minder as gospel, I'd suggest a UOA from a lab like Oil Analyzers that does a good job with fuel dilution. This should tell you whether your particular engine and driving style make long intervals appropriate.
 
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640
Location
Colorado
Originally Posted by mightymousetech
I am a dealer tech (20 years with Acura/Honda) every couple years we get another service bulletin from Engineering stating that doing the first oil change early can damage the engine, and we are NOT to change the factory fill early. The factory fill oil is not the issue, it is the high moly assembly lube used they want retained in the oil. Doing the first oil change early can cause hot spots to form in the engine.
If you do change it early, put in Mazda dealership oil with high moly 0w20, or Zepro high-moly 0w20 from Amazon. Fram Ultra oil filters filter better than anything else, always good too.
 
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1,431
Location
TX
My 2017 Civic hatch had it's first oil change at around 4,500mi. Reason for that was rising oil level on the dipstick. I've done UOA on factory fill and sure enough it showed elevated wear numbers (which is expected), as well as super low viscosity 5.8cst or so. Never had oil level issues since. Engine consumes no detectable amount of oil. Btw, OLM was reading 60% left when i changed factory fill - no way i'd drive 10k+ on the oil that is thin as ATF. With all of the above - change it anytime, no harm at all
 
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4,107
Location
SW Ohio
Originally Posted by asiancivicmaniac
How long should I keep the break-in oil? I plan on following the OLM after break-in on the Civic.
Follow the OLM from day one. There is no break-in period on modern Hondas or most other vehicles.
 
Messages
640
Location
Colorado
Originally Posted by hallstevenson
Follow the OLM from day one. There is no break-in period on modern Hondas or most other vehicles.
Not true. Lots of 2018 & 2019 Owners Manuals specifically mention break-in procedures. Modern lapping and honing are not perfect, although better than 1970.
Originally Posted by paoester
Originally Posted by VNTS
Jeep indirectly says brief full throttle acceleration within limits of the law and varying RPM constitutes good break in right in the owners manual for break in.
Volkswagen (2019 Tiguan Owners Manual) says: Break-in period A new engine must be carefully broken in during the first 1000 miles (1600 kilometers). During the first few hours of driving, the engine's internal friction is higher than later when all moving parts have been broken in. Breaking in a new engine Do not use full throttle. Don't let the engine speed get above 2/3 of the maximum speed. Do not tow a trailer. Speed may gradually be increased to maximum permissible road and engine speed. Engine life is influenced by how you drive the vehicle for the first 1000 miles (1600 km). Even afterwards, driving at moderate engine speeds, especially when the engine is cold, will tend to reduce engine wear and help the engine to last longer and go farther. But do not drive at an excessively low engine speed, either. Always downshift if the engine is not running smoothly. .... the rings should twist in their seats, spending about ~equal time on all parts of the rounded face, where twist amount is governed by load & rpm ranges. Some engine makers think moly cuts down on those hot areas.
 
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13,322
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1/2 hr N.E. of Detroit
Originally Posted by paoester
"The goal is to get the engine's piston rings, which expand, contract and flex, to seat properly on the cylinder walls." -- https://auto.howstuffworks.com/do-still-have-to-break-in-new-car.htm That has a decent summary of what many auto makers put in their Owner's Manual.
.... but the automaker may not have built the engine. Then does (hypothetical) GM decide what's in the Owners Manual, or do the Koreans that made the engine?
 
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640
Location
Colorado
Originally Posted by Triple_Se7en
.... but the automaker may not have built the engine. Then does (hypothetical) GM decide what's in the Owners Manual, or do the Koreans that made the engine?
That a serious concern? Really? ... Well, maybe some people don't know that OEMs always have a team of engineers overseeing manufacturing processes, monitoring quality, and specifying standards & performance. GM or Ford or FCA or VAG or whoever, gets involved in any engine production contract.
 
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