Crushed washer

Messages
15,021
Location
Upper Midwest
I have always used the Toyota OEM washers on my Toyota cars, and the Honda OEM ones on my Honda. The Toyota ones are an aluminum/fiber composite and the Honda are plain aluminum. I have never had any leaks from either one. I usually don't replace the Toyota gasket each time I change oil but on the Honda I do, only because I got a bunch from an online dealer when I bought a case of A01 filters a while back. BMW provides a new copper gasket with each filter. [Linked Image from s3.amazonaws.com] [Linked Image from hondaaccordforum.com]
 
Messages
14,974
Location
NE,Ohio
some actually crush and are 100% not reuseable.. subaru comes to mind. others dont crush much.. I've reused the hyundai version 3-4x each no drip etc.
 
Messages
240
Location
Illinois valley
Ask the dealer which washer is correct. Or, does that take all the fun out of the quest? I had to pay for the washers from my Mazda dealer when I bought the filters but the other guy at the counter gave me three for free when I overpaid for some other stuff. I don't buy the cheapest oil so 118 cents for a new washer each time won't kill me. DIY oil change is less than half what a dealer charges for bulk oil and a cheap filter. But hey, at least they overfill it so maybe it's not that bad of a deal.
 
Messages
1,172
Location
California
If you torque the drain plug to spec, you can get several uses out of most drain plug seals even though they are not designed to be re-used. This is what I do because I am a cheap bast**d. The torque spec usually does not completely mangle the seal, just distorts it enough to get a good leakproof seal. So if you ham-fist the drain plug, you won't get many uses out of them. The rubber coated ones are designed to be used over and over, but again you must torque properly for good results.
Originally Posted by PimTac
And for the record it's a CRUSH washer, not crushed.
What if my crush washer is crushed? It's a crushed crush washer laugh I have a crush on crushed crush washers laugh I know, my sense of humor is crushing you.
 
Messages
2,955
Location
Western S.C.
Originally Posted by Gebo
Toyota's OEM are either blue or black. They have either a blue or black coating on them.
All I've seen are blue plastic-coated aluminum. They want you to replace it every time, but that isn't necessary, given reasonable care. The one now on my car is on its 7th change, and hasn't leaked yet. My previous cars used steel and aluminum washers. None of them were ever replaced or ever leaked, either. The aluminum one did become thinner after numerous re-uses.
 
Messages
4,112
Location
WA
Originally Posted by DGXR
Originally Posted by PimTac
And for the record it's a CRUSH washer, not crushed.
What if my crush washer is crushed? It's a crushed crush washer laugh I have a crush on crushed crush washers laugh I know, my sense of humor is crushing you.
Oh boy, you're just crushing it aren't you?...‚
 
Messages
7
Location
Chicago, IL
I'm happy to have not dealt with crush washers in a long time, despite dozens of oil changes over a number of vehicles. I do it all topside now with a suction tank system through the dipstick hole. Nice to not have to worry about drips, distortion, new washers, etc.
 
Messages
240
Location
Illinois valley
The old washer has a dent where it crushed. With a new washer I just give the wrench one last yank and the plug is sealed and tight. No need to pull tighter.
 
Messages
429
Location
MN
I reuse what's there if it's still in decent shape. If not, I use the harbor freight copper crush washers in the assortment pack.
 
Messages
2,955
Location
Western S.C.
Originally Posted by elverado
I'm happy to have not dealt with crush washers in a long time, despite dozens of oil changes over a number of vehicles. I do it all topside now with a suction tank system through the dipstick hole. Nice to not have to worry about drips, distortion, new washers, etc.
My experience is that the washer on the drain plug is a non-issue, the least of my problems. However, I'm considering switching partially to "topside" changes for other reasons. What device do you use? I see a manual suction tank system on Amazon which seems a good idea, but gets mostly negative user reviews.
 
Messages
4,112
Location
WA
Originally Posted by CR94
Originally Posted by elverado
I'm happy to have not dealt with crush washers in a long time, despite dozens of oil changes over a number of vehicles. I do it all topside now with a suction tank system through the dipstick hole. Nice to not have to worry about drips, distortion, new washers, etc.
My experience is that the washer on the drain plug is a non-issue, the least of my problems. However, I'm considering switching partially to "topside" changes for other reasons. What device do you use? I see a manual suction tank system on Amazon which seems a good idea, but gets mostly negative user reviews.
If I may, i have a 5ltr (or maybe it's 4, i can't recall exactly) manual extractor that just collects dust for the most part. (i have used it for other things though). The reason I don't use it for pulling out oil is my dipstick tube is curved so that eliminates using anything rigid. I have the soft plastic tubing that came with it but I found when inserted all the way down into the pan, there is no way to prevent it from curling up. I've tried straightening it out using a heat gun and laying it flat with something heavy on it to try and get it to stay straight but as it cools it eventually wants to revert back to a curled form. That small amount of curl at the end prevents the unit from getting out all of the oil. Maybe there's better tubing out there, dunno. I got tired of dickin around with it and just threw it up on the shelf. It works fine for PSF and brake fluid reservoir but I already had something for that. (that red/black manual pump from HF)
 
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Messages
13,322
Location
1/2 hr N.E. of Detroit
Originally Posted by elverado
I'm happy to have not dealt with crush washers in a long time, despite dozens of oil changes over a number of vehicles. I do it all topside now with a suction tank system through the dipstick hole. Nice to not have to worry about drips, distortion, new washers, etc.
Your new worry should be eventual sludge at the bottom of your oil pan.
 
Messages
7,174
Location
North Carolina
Originally Posted by Triple_Se7en
Your new worry should be eventual sludge at the bottom of your oil pan.
smirk2 If it's so settled to not come out with a hot topside change, it isn't coming out with a conventional drain either.
 
Messages
7
Location
Chicago, IL
Yup, if you're dealing with sludge or particulates in your pan not picked up by the filtration and detergent suspension system then you have bigger issues. This isn't a John Deere tractor on non detergent HDEO. Good enough for Porsche and Mercedes service manuals and it's good enough for me.
 
Messages
7
Location
Chicago, IL
Originally Posted by CR94
Originally Posted by elverado
I'm happy to have not dealt with crush washers in a long time, despite dozens of oil changes over a number of vehicles. I do it all topside now with a suction tank system through the dipstick hole. Nice to not have to worry about drips, distortion, new washers, etc.
My experience is that the washer on the drain plug is a non-issue, the least of my problems. However, I'm considering switching partially to "topside" changes for other reasons. What device do you use? I see a manual suction tank system on Amazon which seems a good idea, but gets mostly negative user reviews.
I have been using the BavAuto Oil Extractor for the last year or so, after I bought a V6 minivan needing higher capacity. For the ten years before that I used this smaller one. It gets used for far more than oil changes. Brake bleeding, trans fluid changes, power steering fluid refreshes. Great for lawn mowers, ATVs, boats, air compressors where the drain options are limited or messy. I maintain some family cars and sometimes will have three in the driveway I suck dry, swap filters, and fill up in 45 mins even at 5 degrees in January. Don't miss having to jack things up and remove splash pans either. I've heard that some cars have too convoluted of a dipstick tube for it to work. But so far have used it on a number of Hondas, Mazdas, Fords, and my MINI Cooper and it sucks them dry. German cars seem to be built for them with the cartridge filters accessible from within the engine bay. Probably not worth it if the oil filter is buried deep underside and needs a catch tray anyway, but luckily my cars don't have that issue.
 
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