Changing spark plugs based on age and not mileage

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Picked up a cream puff 2013 Volkswagen Jetta with 23K miles on it that literally was a "Little Old Lady from Pasadena" type owned vehicle. Garage kept and dealer provable oil changes every 5K miles maintenance. As I do with all new to me used vehicle, I go through maintenance schedule and work on changing out any items that can not have been proven already addressed. Per the maintenance table, spark plugs are a every 40K miles interval but has a side note of "Every 6 years regardless of mileage: Replace spark plugs". Mileage wise, I am have another 17K miles to go. Age wise, I am pushing 7 years on the vehicle. I have never heard of changing spark plugs due to age. What are the risks of just blowing off the age requirement and running them out to the normal 40K miles before changing them?
 
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Huntington WV
Having owned several VAG products I've always changed at 40k religiously. I've never had any go even close to age but I wouldn't think it would be a big deal as long as they haven't been hurt due to short tripping. I'd concentrate on other issues first like brake fluid which is a time sensitive issue.
 
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PEARL River la
I change mine at 5 year mark as well as when I first buy one. On Caravan it only had 3k but build date is 12/17 so I didn't do it this time. It's called preventive maintenance.
 
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Suburban Washington DC
Originally Posted by Hootbro
Mileage wise, I am have another 17K miles to go.
If I was keeping the car I'd just keep them but remove, clean and dab anti-seize on the threads. If flipping it, replace them to give it a fresh start.
 
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South Central PA (Fulton Co)
Originally Posted by BMWTurboDzl
Perhaps VAG wants to lessen the chance of having problems pulling an aged plug?
Kinda what I was thinking. The ones I did on the SLK were the original 16 year old plugs and they were in there real, real good. Glad there was only 4 because it was a nerve racking adventure I don't want to go through again...
 
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Originally Posted by Hootbro
Per the maintenance table, spark plugs are a every 40K miles interval but has a side note of "Every 6 years regardless of mileage: Replace spark plugs". Mileage wise, I am have another 17K miles to go. Age wise, I am pushing 7 years on the vehicle. I have never heard of changing spark plugs due to age. What are the risks of just blowing off the age requirement and running them out to the normal 40K miles before changing them?
I would go with the 6 years. You don't have much to gain by pushing it. smile
 
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America's Dairyland
What are the chances a steel plug will stick in a aluminum head after 6 years? What is the cost of replacing the cylinder head?...vs the cost of 4 plugs? Answer those questions and I believe you will answer yourself.
 
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wv
I would inspect the airbox for nests.. I picked up a 6 year old vehicle with 40K on it this year and it had a sizable nest in the airbox. I also pulled the cabin air filter and it was pretty nasty (i dont like breathing other peoples stuff). I pulled 2 plugs and both looked almost new..so not gonna look again for awhile. From the story i was told mine was also owned by an older retired lady... so with that being said i know they love the brake pedal... my brakes were pretty far gone. So mine got air filter/cabin filter/brake pads/trans fluid, a dose of Redline Si-1 with top tier gas and an italian tuneup..
 
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The cabin, air and oil filter with oil change were fresh within the last couple of weeks when I bought it. Already changed the OEM battery just because due to age but it still was in good shape. I am probably just going to add the plugs to other things I plan to change out like the tires, brake fluid, coolant and fuel filter due to just being aged. Just my first time finding a time interval for spark plugs and thought it was a little weird.
 
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Don't think the fuel filter is replaceable on any gas car made in the last 10 years. Transmission fluid change should be on the list but coolant should be good for 10 years.
 
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NJ
Based on the song lyrics, I'd change the plugs sooner than later. And everybody's saying that there's nobody meaner than The Little Old Lady From Pasadena. She drives real fast and she drives real hard, She's the terror of Colorado Boulevard.
 

Astro14

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Electrodes wear (a tiny, tiny bit) with each firing, so you have a mileage recommendation/limit on plugs that correlates to number of firing events. But steel threads in aluminum become difficult to remove based on heat cycles and age. I would at least remove and examine them. I'm sure the electrodes look good. If it were me, having gone through the trouble of removing them, new ones would go back in.
 
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I say change the plugs. This will do several things: -- the condition of the plugs tells you the general running condition of the engine, which is always good to know -- you can be sure there is some anti-seize on the threads, if required, and are at correct torque and gap -- you can see any corrosion on the plug body, and if severe, will make you very glad that you changed them -- you will be following the manufacturer's recommendation
 
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Central Texas
Originally Posted by DGXR
-- you can be sure there is some anti-seize on the threads, if required, and are at correct torque and gap
Be care using anti-seize and torquing to spec. Some anti-seize especially those containing molydisulfide are so slick that you can damage things if you torque them to spec. What happens is that, say you are torquing a nut on a bolt to specified torque, the bold is being stretched further that it should be. Learned that the hard way. would appreciate any info about how much (or less) to torque something using a molydisufide grease. Molydisulfide grease is great for exhaust manifolds. You can easily undo the nuts years later. Most anti-seize is good for about 3 weeks on hot exhaust parts.
 
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North Carolina
Originally Posted by borgward
Any recommendation on removing them from an aluminum head after 6 years?
Be careful. I do this on aluminum heads when they are cold. When the plug loosens, work it back and forth rather than crank it out with the threads attached. Working back and forth slowly allows carbon to fall from the threads. Easier to so with a short flex handle on a socket rather than a ratchet. I use a slight bit antiseize even on the ngk plugs. Keep the antiseize away from the porcelain. I tighten by feel, careful not to over tighten.
 
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Texas
Originally Posted by atikovi
Originally Posted by Hootbro
Mileage wise, I am have another 17K miles to go.
If I was keeping the car I'd just keep them but remove, clean and dab anti-seize on the threads. If flipping it, replace them to give it a fresh start.
Interesting. Shouldn't it be replace them if YOU are keeping it and just clean /gap and reinstall if you're flipping it? Furthermore, any effort to remove a part like a spark plug - I am only putting a new one back in. NO sense to reuse a spark plug to only go back and change it again later.
 

4WD

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Originally Posted by atikovi
Originally Posted by Hootbro
Mileage wise, I am have another 17K miles to go.
If I was keeping the car I'd just keep them but remove, clean and dab anti-seize on the threads. If flipping it, replace them to give it a fresh start.
That's what I'd start to worry about … bad day when you gall those fine threads …
 
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