'best' conventional 10w-40 pcmo for wet clutch bike

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672
Location
Palmyra, PA
I am seeking feedback on what folks feel is the 'best' conventional 10w-40 pcmo for use wet clutch bikes...before someone tells me to spend the 'extra few bucks' on motorcycle oil I wanna let it be known that I do shorter OCI's deliberately to reduce shearing; those 'extra few bucks' add up! I also want to use 10w-40(vs 15w-40 hdeo) for better flow during cool temps...
 
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2,529
Location
wv
Originally Posted by kmrcstintn
I am seeking feedback on what folks feel is the 'best' conventional 10w-40 pcmo for use wet clutch bikes...before someone tells me to spend the 'extra few bucks' on motorcycle oil I wanna let it be known that I do shorter OCI's deliberately to reduce shearing; those 'extra few bucks' add up! I also want to use 10w-40(vs 15w-40 hdeo) for better flow during cool temps...
The cheapest 10w40 that i know of is Supertech at $3.12/qt but you asked for the 'best conventional """"" for use in wet clutch bikes" but you also want to save 'extra bucks'.. so i am going to go out on a limb here and say Valvoline 4 Stroke ATV. Its $4.54 a quart https://www.walmart.com/ip/Valvolin...514362?variantFieldId=multipack_quantity And has all the specs you need. Regular Valvoline White Bottle 10w40 is $6 a quart so i think its a bargain.
 
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271
Location
New York
Originally Posted by kmrcstintn
I also want to use 10w-40(vs 15w-40 hdeo) for better flow during cool temps...
What are 'cool temps' for you? Unless you are starting your engine at subzero temps, there's very little difference between 10w-40 and 15w-40.
 
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2,304
Location
US-WA
Originally Posted by ad244
Rotella T4 or T5
Or T6, all in 15w40. Honestly, nothing a 15w40 can't handle temp wise that a rider can. Ran in the teens with no noticeable difference in startup and operation in a V twin. The R1 needs a little warm up with sub 5K RPM operation so the idiot light doesn't come on.
 
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Messages
2,413
Location
Deep in the heart of Jersey
Well my bike is different then yours, but here's what I use . I use 20/50 wt in the motor, and I ride all winter. You'll never have a problem starting as long as your battery is hot. I keep mine on a tender whenever it's in the garage. I use Rotella t triple protection 15/40 in the primary(clutch) and it shifts fine all thru the oci. I'm sure 10w40 wt would work just as well, but I use the 15/40 for other machines so it's always on hand. I use 75/90 wt gear oil in the trans all year round and it keeps the trans quite and shifts smooth, I've used these wt oils since I got the bike, and it's getting close to 75k miles. Find a brand you like that's easy to get and in your price range and stick with it. Every brand out there claims to be the best, buying what works for you saves, time and money and disappointment when you realize every oil doesn't work the best in every vehicle.,,,
 
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4,263
Location
Port Orange, Florida
Any 10w40 auto oil will work so I d go with the cheapest. Wet clutches really just need to stay wet to work. I be tried a bunch of different oils, including ATF in a two strokes transmission without issues. Gear oil doesn't work, but any motor oil or any ATF was fine.
 
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360
Location
Central Texas
Originally Posted by toneydoc
For shorter OCI, I would buy any name brand oil that was on sale and put it to use
+1; they'll all be too similar in performance. You need a thick base oil to run with the gearbox on a shared sump bike. This is a difference in PCMO 10w-40s and MC 10w-40 blends. If you're gonna do PCMO, do 20w-50 for that reason. If you don't, then do something rated for a gearbox spec. There are some 15w-40s that are close to a 10w-40, and the cost difference is minimal--I am of the belief that it would bring the risk of fretting fatigue down much further.
 
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1,308
Location
Ca USA
There is a growing consensus among high mileage owners that either a motorcycle specific or PCMO oil will meet and exceed your mileage expectations... Here are two easy to find 40 grades with similar additives... the biggest difference as you noted is cost... $12.00 Amsoil versus $4.57 Mobil... [Linked Image]
 
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24,567
Location
PNW
Yep, just get Valvoline 10W-40 4-stroke motorcycle oil at Walmart for ~$4.50 a qt. Meets JASO MA motorcycle wet clutch specs. Lots of guys like this oil. Motorcycles don't hold 8 qts of oil, so how's i going to break the bank at $4.50/qt ... ??
 
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1,308
Location
Ca USA
[quote=kmrcstintn I also want to use 10w-40(vs 15w-40 hdeo) for better flow during cool temps...[/quote] You're right about 10w flowing quicker than a 15w during critical start up... this is true whether outside temp is 0º or 104º however once operating temp is establish both flow as a 40 Grade... The sole purpose API ranks the first number 10 and the letter W is to inform the buyer the oils ability to flow during critical start up because API knows the most wear happens during critical startup... 0W 5W 10W 15W 20W[/quote]
 
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15,091
Location
Upper Midwest
Can you please stop with this nonsense you keep posting? What you've posted in regards to what the winter rating means is not correct. You've posted it before and it has been carefully explained to you multiple times but yet here it is again.
Originally Posted by BusyLittleShop
You're right about 10w flowing quicker than a 15w during critical start up... this is true whether outside temp is 0º or 104º however once operating temp is establish both flow as a 40 Grade... The sole purpose API ranks the first number 10 and the letter W is to inform the buyer the oils ability to flow during critical start up because API knows the most wear happens during critical startup... 0W 5W 10W 15W 20W
 
Messages
1,308
Location
Ca USA
Originally Posted by Brian553
You need a thick base oil to run with the gearbox on a shared sump bike.
Think again Brian... Blackstone Labs data shows thin is in... The Importance of Viscosity? Quote Blackstone Labs The viscosity, or thickness of the oil, is not nearly as important as many people think. Oil retains its nature no matter what thickness it is.Think about this: automakers are continually recommending lighter multi-grade oil in new engines. The reason is increased efficiency. It takes power to pump oil through an engine, and the lighter the oil, the less power required to pump it. The oil's ability to act like a solid and protect parts is not related to its thickness. If that doesn't sound quite right, consider this: The gears in a heavy duty Allison automatic transmission are doing the same work as the same machine equipped with an Eaton manual transmission. Due to the hydraulics of the automatic, it runs on a 10W automatic transmission oil.But the manual transmission uses a very thick (sometimes up to 90W)gear lube oil. The gears of both types of transmissions will have a similar life span. We don't find any significant differences in wear, regardless of oil thickness.
 
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