Anti seize ?

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794
Location
NJ
The Permatex is good stuff. For past 50+ years I've been using Never-Seize, graphite based, because my father used it. It has served me well, never has failed. You can get it at plumbing supply stores. I use it on car's lug nuts, besides bolts which are heated, exhaust, ... Bicycles, lawn mower bolts especially the blade bolt, snowblowers
 
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313
Location
Burleson,Texas
Never seize on lug nuts will change the torque value. Lug nut torque relies on the friction of the nut threads and the friction of the nut shoulder and the wheel. Any lubricant will change the value.
 
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323
Location
wa
Thread starter
I was thinking using Al type anti seize, may not be a good idea on all Al parts, since it is already a case of Al on Al. That permatex is okay on steel bolts, just not sure about all aluminum.
 
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6,820
Location
California
Loctite C5-A. A Costco tire installer turned me onto this years ago and I've never looked back. It's a Cu/Al/graphite-filled grease. I use that stuff especially on bikes where a steel screw or bottom bracket shell threads into Al frames. I used to use it on spark plugs but not anymore.
 
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Messages
130
Location
On the Lake, Ohio
Originally Posted by nthach
Loctite C5-A. A Costco tire installer turned me onto this years ago and I've never looked back. It's a Cu/Al/graphite-filled grease. I use that stuff especially on bikes where a steel screw or bottom bracket shell threads into Al frames. I used to use it on spark plugs but not anymore.
+ 1 on Loctite Anti-Seize products! I've used it for over 10 years now on my Harley Davidsons. Just make sure you purchase the correct product for the job at hand.
 

JHZR2

Staff member
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44,460
Location
New Jersey
Originally Posted by Exhaustgases
I was thinking using Al type anti seize, may not be a good idea on all Al parts, since it is already a case of Al on Al. That permatex is okay on steel bolts, just not sure about all aluminum.
That may not be exactly the case. I believe these are metal mixtures, and may include graphite, moly, oil, etc. But I think your premise that the AS materials must be carefully considered is a good one.
Originally Posted by nthach
Loctite C5-A. A Costco tire installer turned me onto this years ago and I've never looked back. It's a Cu/Al/graphite-filled grease. I use that stuff especially on bikes where a steel screw or bottom bracket shell threads into Al frames. I used to use it on spark plugs but not anymore.
I use this a lot, including wheels (on the hub, not the lugs), but decided against it after a while because Al and Cu aren't a good pair. I read someplace that Zn anti seize is best for aluminum to steel connections, so that's what I use there. Aluminum to aluminum I'd probably consider nickel, marine type, or regular grease.
 
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279
Location
Kah-nah-dah
Nickel anti-seize works a treat on almost everything. Even the evils of stainless steel into aluminium. For lug nuts and studs... Don't get it on the sear, threads only, and as a rule drop torque 10%. If it calls for 100ft/lbs, torque to 90. Works great on the wheel face and hub lip, to keep your wheels from seizing on. So nice not having to beat your wheels or nuts off. *cough*
 
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24,080
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
Originally Posted by gamefoo21
Nickel anti-seize works a treat on almost everything. Even the evils of stainless steel into aluminium. For lug nuts and studs... Don't get it on the sear, threads only, and as a rule drop torque 10%. If it calls for 100ft/lbs, torque to 90. Works great on the wheel face and hub lip, to keep your wheels from seizing on. So nice not having to beat your wheels or nuts off. *cough*
Always check the owners manual, the info above may not be correct in some cases. On the bolt shown lubed threads and seat are taken into account for the torque spec. [Linked Image]
 
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279
Location
Kah-nah-dah
That's the first time I've seen that, but I'll definitely keep that in mind. I'll revise my advice to account for that. Sort of like how when I install basically any of the important torqued bolts in any engine, I always make sure that the threads are well lubed with anti-seize and the face of the nut or bolt head also get greased. Maximize the tension torque rather than fastener friction. The number of garages I've had to argue with, some would hose off the hubs with brake clean. Around these parts 6 months is enough to seize wheels and lugs.
 
Messages
24,080
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
When dealing with Euro cars stuff like this comes up all the time. I see in some Euro manuals this is standard procedure but the US manual for the same car sometimes does not and the wheel bolts are brutal to remove on cars used in the salt belt that have been mounted for any amount of time. This is usually cars with alloy wheels and use wheel bolts.
 
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