Anabond 230 for bonding brake linings

Messages
468
Location
Newport News, VA
Thread starter
https://www.indiamart.com/proddetail/anabond-230-brake-shoe-bonding-21264336562.html There is also a good youtube video shows how this adhesive works. Does anyone know how to get something similar in the USA easily? I am attempting to contact IndiaMart, but honestly its tough to buy even though they say readily available, they dont make it easy. They say stuff like many suppliers, I am of course used to ordering online many things with an automated process. And calling India could get expensive and be a waste of my time. It does seem to be cheap about 850 rupees for 1 kilogram which is maybe $12 or so. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kd9cLW1hMOQ
 
Last edited:
Messages
468
Location
Newport News, VA
Thread starter
I may just have to use JB Weld. My application would be to bond kevlar or carbon fiber cloth to steel discs to be used in a Limited slip differential. The problem is since the rear LSD is from 1996, and an Isuzu Trooper, no one makes the clutch packs anymore. JB weld is good for high heat and these are not going to get that hot bathed in gear oil. I figure absolutely no one on this forum has ever done such a thing. You can also buy clutch material, I emailed mcMaster carr to ask if they sell the bonding adhesive. https://www.mcmaster.com/brake-lining
 
Last edited:
Messages
468
Location
Newport News, VA
Thread starter
Nope they dont sell any bonding adhesives. Wonder if I can get Raybestos adhesives. http://adhesives.raybestospowertrain.com/%2fPortals%2fRaybestosBC%2fFiles%2fPM_1389%2fAdhesives_selection_guide.pdf
 
Messages
2,700
Location
USA
Generically it is known as phenolic resin. It is a thermoset process which means the part needs to be baked to a high temperature to set the resin. You're probably right that epoxy would work in a lower temperature application.
 
Messages
468
Location
Newport News, VA
Thread starter
Originally Posted by mk378
Generically it is known as phenolic resin. It is a thermoset process which means the part needs to be baked to a high temperature to set the resin. You're probably right that epoxy would work in a lower temperature application.
Yes, I think the JB Weld would work in a wet clutch. I got a quote back from the seller, it would be about $49 shipped to me for 1 KG. Certainly is not too hard to use the adhesive. Question is about the friction material, friction plates are double sided and the material on each side, may be less than 1/8" the smallest McMaster Carr offering. It may be better to use a thinner kevlar or carbon fiber cloth. I am thinking it is around 1/16" thick material on each side of a disc, if they are the same as friction plates in a transmission.
 
Last edited:
Instead of trying to rebond the discs, why not see if you can change out the clutch differential to a detroit locker or tru trac. That way you would never have to worry about clutches or adding FM to your diff etc. Yukon gear & Axle has listings on your vehicle, actually their chart shows listings from 1986 to 2001.. I would be very wary about bonding friction material, especially since the bonding process requires heat and pressure that are impossible to replicate at home. If the epoxy fails you will destroy the diff, and it will happen when there is load on the drive train, possibly causing substantial damage or an accident. Just my $.02. Also the Anabond may be a chemical that cannot be imported into the US due to toxicity or contain chemicals banned in the US.
 
Last edited:
Messages
8,871
Location
Marshfield , MA
any way to use extra material and put a rivet in outside the swept area? I sawed up a pair of rear pads from my BMW to get material to re-line the disc pads on my '77 IH Cadet 80.
 
Messages
468
Location
Newport News, VA
Thread starter
Originally Posted by Gimpy1
Instead of trying to rebond the discs, why not see if you can change out the clutch differential to a detroit locker or tru trac. That way you would never have to worry about clutches or adding FM to your diff etc. Yukon gear & Axle has listings on your vehicle, actually their chart shows listings from 1986 to 2001.. I would be very wary about bonding friction material, especially since the bonding process requires heat and pressure that are impossible to replicate at home. If the epoxy fails you will destroy the diff, and it will happen when there is load on the drive train, possibly causing substantial damage or an accident. Just my $.02. Also the Anabond may be a chemical that cannot be imported into the US due to toxicity or contain chemicals banned in the US.
I am sure California would object, Virginia I think is not a problem. Do you have a link to this differential parts? On the Isuzu forum they say nothing is available for the 12 bolt Isuzu rear OEM LSD trooper.
 
Messages
468
Location
Newport News, VA
Thread starter
Originally Posted by andyd
any way to use extra material and put a rivet in outside the swept area? I sawed up a pair of rear pads from my BMW to get material to re-line the disc pads on my '77 IH Cadet 80.
A differential clutch plate is too thin to rivet, think of them like automatic transmission wet clutches, they are thin.
 
Top