1977 2-stroke moped ESSO 2-T 18:1?

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3
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Boston
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I inherited a 1977(?) Carabela 60cc 2 stroke moped. The manual says to use an ESSO 2-T 18:1 mix. Is/was ESSO 2-T the same thing as regular 2-cycle oil? Any thoughts on weather I really need to mix it that rich? Thanks!
 
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9,796
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Jupiter, Florida
As a general rule, very few 2t engines require such a mixture. In our testing, 32 to 1 (or 4 ounces per gallon) provided all the wear protection possible in outboard engines. However, there are a few "cheap" engines that don't use roller bearings in critical locations, but instead use a brass or "oilite" bushing. Those engines do need very rich oil mixtures. Examples include some 1960's 2 stroke lawn mowers and other ancient engines. I don't know how your engine is constructed, but it is a Mexican copy of a European design. I suspect it's a conventional roller bearing design and would do just fine on 32 to 1.
 
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795
Location
Michigan
If you change the mix ratio (32-1, 40-1, 50-1) you will need the carb mixture settings adjusted, you will be rich in fuel if you don't.
 
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24,130
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PNW
Originally Posted by MolaKule
It looks to me like the crankshaft has roller bearings while the connecting rod has bushing bearings.
Big end looks like a caged needle bearing. Diagram doesn't have enough resolution to really tell.
 
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962
Location
UK
Originally Posted by N8conn
Is/was ESSO 2-T the same thing as regular 2-cycle oil?
I'd guess so, yes. Esso is just the name of an oil company - part of ExxonMobil now. Esso comes from 'S' 'O', which comes from Standard Oil. Outside of America, Esso is to us what Exxon is to you. I have no reason to believe that Esso 2T oil was anything different (in general terms) from any similar 2T oil. One difference may be whether the oil they recommend is prediluted or not.
 
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3
Location
Boston
Thread starter
Wow, thanks for the awesome responses! Sounds like I should mix it to the original spec because it may have some of the old school bushings rather than roller bearings. Thanks again everyone!
 
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