01 accord new rear wheel bearing - lots of drag after install

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23
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Canada
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Please see this install video of how freely the new bearing spins towards end of video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8T4Tug4_YnE and how tight mine is https://youtu.be/IjJ4BfG0sPg I did everything as per the service manual... I did put some moly grease on the hub just to get it to easily slide in, and then hand tightened the new spindle nut (aftermarket beck arnley but it was the correct one for my car) and torqued afterwards to 139 ft/ib.... what gives? I originally install a cheap china bearing and after torquing that one, it didn't move until I gave it a few tugs... so I thought dumb move, i'll get a proper bearing, so I ordered an SKF, and while this one clearly didn't seize, it seems like it's way too much drag...
 
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Canada
Thread starter
Originally Posted by SatinSilver
Where did you buy the skf bearing from? Google skf counterfeit bearing to make sure you didn't get a fake.
rock auto. Should I be worried?
 
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858
Location
Alberta
Two things come to mind. 1. The inner race was pushed during installation damaging the races 2. It needs to be driven to "loosen up" enough to run freely. Not sure if either apply, but I would try a short trip to see if things loosen up and it runs freely after.
 

JHZR2

Staff member
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New Jersey
139 ft-lb seems really high for a spindle nut. Have you punched it into place? Can you work back out the punch you made? I suspect you just have it too tight. I did bearings on a trailer recently, and its a fraction of a turn between very loose and very tight. My Mercedes cars require use of a dial indicator to get the right amount of play in the bearing. That is the truest way to get it right, IMO, though folks seldom do that and in many cases it just doesnt matter. Thought I had read elsewhere an install example, which was torque to a (lower) value, IIRC 60 ft-lb, to set the bearings and get the grease worked through, then back off and make it finger tight. NOT saying that's right for your application, but Im hung up on the 139 ft-lb...
 
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23
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Canada
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I already punched it, and the service manual explicitly states 139 ft ib, I can take a picture of it later. I drove it for probably 30km and it was still hot. The car will get driven another 50km today and I will see how it is tonight
 
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2,700
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USA
This is a cartridge type bearing where bearing clearance is internally set. Installation is simply to put the nut on tight and leave it. Something must be wrong with the new bearing.
 
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99
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted by JHZR2
139 ft-lb seems really high for a spindle nut. Have you punched it into place? Can you work back out the punch you made? I suspect you just have it too tight. I did bearings on a trailer recently, and its a fraction of a turn between very loose and very tight. My Mercedes cars require use of a dial indicator to get the right amount of play in the bearing. That is the truest way to get it right, IMO, though folks seldom do that and in many cases it just doesnt matter. Thought I had read elsewhere an install example, which was torque to a (lower) value, IIRC 60 ft-lb, to set the bearings and get the grease worked through, then back off and make it finger tight. NOT saying that's right for your application, but Im hung up on the 139 ft-lb...
Are you confusing the style of bearing OP has with the older tapered roller style where you'd just tighten it to finger tight so there is no play? My VW uses a similar rear bearing to this Honda and The torque spec for that nut was quiet high as well. I don't recall it being that hard to turn but it definitely didn't spin as free as the old one it replaced.
 

JHZR2

Staff member
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44,286
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New Jersey
Originally Posted by AdamZ
Originally Posted by JHZR2
139 ft-lb seems really high for a spindle nut. Have you punched it into place? Can you work back out the punch you made? I suspect you just have it too tight. I did bearings on a trailer recently, and its a fraction of a turn between very loose and very tight. My Mercedes cars require use of a dial indicator to get the right amount of play in the bearing. That is the truest way to get it right, IMO, though folks seldom do that and in many cases it just doesnt matter. Thought I had read elsewhere an install example, which was torque to a (lower) value, IIRC 60 ft-lb, to set the bearings and get the grease worked through, then back off and make it finger tight. NOT saying that's right for your application, but Im hung up on the 139 ft-lb...
Are you confusing the style of bearing OP has with the older tapered roller style where you'd just tighten it to finger tight so there is no play? My VW uses a similar rear bearing to this Honda and The torque spec for that nut was quiet high as well. I don't recall it being that hard to turn but it definitely didn't spin as free as the old one it replaced.
Yes, indeed I am. Thanks! Despite my misunderstanding, something is wrong... especially if it is feeling hot...
 
Messages
633
Location
USA
Originally Posted by Johan1
I did everything as per the service manual... I did put some moly grease on the hub just to get it to easily slide in, and then hand tightened the new spindle nut (aftermarket beck arnley but it was the correct one for my car) and torqued afterwards to 139 ft/ib.... what gives? I originally install a cheap china bearing and after torquing that one, it didn't move until I gave it a few tugs... so I thought dumb move, i'll get a proper bearing, so I ordered an SKF, and while this one clearly didn't seize, it seems like it's way too much drag...
Speaking exclusively and ONLY for an SKF tapered bearing ( with Timken being almost identical)- this is a generalization for bearings around 1" ish ID on the bore with width unknown since i don't have an exact part # or your specific vehicle load characteristics This is also assuming races are true/bottomed and shafts are turned to proper dimension. For light load applications with high RPM ( basically a car) the standard recommended setting is 100% fill packing with a true COLD clearance of about .004" ( it opens up as the ID goes up). They also change as RPM and load changes so this is not a universal number. That .004" is a straight pull measured with an indicator. The reason is that with thermal growth this will work to approximately a 0.000" preload which is the design point. ( slight preload is ok but not to exceed about .002") Anything outside of that range will affect both the load characteristics and boundary requirements for the bearing and most likely lead to premature failure. You do NOT "torque" these bearings down ( in the conventional usage of the term)- you are setting and holding a critical dimension. (distinction with a difference) Your video APPEARS to have excessive preload- I recommend adjustment and follow OEM instructions because there are some times when an OEM has added a variable that the bearing OEM doesn't factor in with the general published criteria.
 
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9,923
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USA
Originally Posted by JHZR2
139 ft-lb seems really high for a spindle nut. Have you punched it into place? Can you work back out the punch you made? I suspect you just have it too tight. I did bearings on a trailer recently, and its a fraction of a turn between very loose and very tight. My Mercedes cars require use of a dial indicator to get the right amount of play in the bearing. That is the truest way to get it right, IMO, though folks seldom do that and in many cases it just doesnt matter. Thought I had read elsewhere an install example, which was torque to a (lower) value, IIRC 60 ft-lb, to set the bearings and get the grease worked through, then back off and make it finger tight. NOT saying that's right for your application, but Im hung up on the 139 ft-lb...
The Mk1 Focus spindle nut torque spec is 173 ft lb smile
 
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23
Location
Canada
Thread starter
Well the only thing I can think of is the bearing is potentially grinding on the back of the dust plate, but I'll know later when I remove everything. This is directly from the service manual with regards to torque spec [Linked Image from i.postimg.cc] This is becoming a nightmare I don't want to deal with. IF there is a different method to installing aftermarket wheel bearings, there should be instructions that come with them. I literally followed the steps in the service manual word for word, it's really hard to screw up the procedure because it's probably the most straight forward wheel bearing i've come across. I luckily bought an extra spindle nut
 
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23,761
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MA, Mittelfranken.de
Remove it, check the spindle for nick or burrs if all smooth install it with a ratchet not too tight and see if it spins freely. If it does tighten it to 100 ft.lb with the torque wrench and check again then final torque, do not restake the nut until its okay. Try a different TW.
 
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633
Location
USA
OK, that's a manned hub, not Tapered. slightly different methodology That tension is adequate so based on your video.. Either its over tensioned something is unseated/binding/deflected Unit is defective Take it off and check- it shouldn't "freewheel" packed with grease but it should turn freely with almost no resistance or binding If it passes that, reinstall carefully and make sure everything seats properly and when "snug", give a partial turn, test ( repeat until properly tensioned)
 
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11,687
Location
North Carolina
I would remove the bearing and see if there are rotation marks on the backing plate. If not then I would reinstall and see at what point in the tightening process, the bearing gets hard to turn. In other words , tighten to 50lbs, see if it's free, then go up in increments of 30lbs or so. When it gets tight back off the torque. It's possible your wrench is off, and the 139lbs setting is really a lot more.
 
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23
Location
Canada
Thread starter
Okay I will do as you all mentioned. The torque wrench is brand new, so I hope the torque specs aren't off... My fear of removing the bearing is that it will damage it, hence why I didn't want to remove it to begin with because the crap CBK I took off is clearly damaged... I will do my best not to damage it but that's obviously out of my control FWIW, I actually did tighten in increments by hand just to make sure it always spun freely
 
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23
Location
Canada
Thread starter
I also started a case with SKF to see if it's real or not, I obviously only have pictures of the box at this point, other then that video I posted
 

JHZR2

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44,286
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New Jersey
Originally Posted by Johan1
Okay I will do as you all mentioned. The torque wrench is brand new, so I hope the torque specs aren't off... My fear of removing the bearing is that it will damage it, hence why I didn't want to remove it to begin with because the crap CBK I took off is clearly damaged... I will do my best not to damage it but that's obviously out of my control FWIW, I actually did tighten in increments by hand just to make sure it always spun freely
So you did it in increments, and it spun freely at x ft-lb, but not at 139? What was x?
 

Kestas

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The Motor City
Hard to judge from the video, but the drag seems normal to me. New bearings are tight. Remember, automotive wheel bearings use 4 lips to seal the bearing on one side. This is where the drag comes from. I've spun many new automotive hub units in the past 20 years. They are always hard to turn. They loosen up a bit with use.
 
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