Recent Topics
02 Protege oil consumption
by smetzger
54 seconds ago
Misspelling
by callbay
10 minutes 23 seconds ago
Suggest an experiment?
by ToadU
53 minutes 3 seconds ago
FCA to produce no *cars* in the US
by Hokiefyd
55 minutes 5 seconds ago
Zero Emission Power Stations...
by Shannow
Today at 05:52 AM
200k!!!! 2005 legacy gt wagon manual transmission
by madRiver
Today at 05:38 AM
Adhesive protective patch in wheelwell
by dlundblad
Today at 05:02 AM
My Faith Has Been Restored
by bobbob
Today at 02:57 AM
Kohler Courage 15
by Commeres
Today at 02:13 AM
Windstar 2001 AC Low and High pressure reading
by pinjc
Yesterday at 09:28 PM
Vacuum Pump Oil for rotary vane pumps.
by bunnspecial
Yesterday at 09:22 PM
ST dino oil realistic OCI
by OILGEEK27
Yesterday at 09:06 PM
Newest Members
donsladek, rummy, OILGEEK27, pinjc, Lee_C
58627 Registered Users
Who's Online
95 registered (adolan21, 09_GXP, AirgunSavant, 2015_PSD, 97 GTP, Andrei, 9 invisible), 1758 Guests and 13 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
58627 Members
66 Forums
252347 Topics
4138864 Posts

Max Online: 2862 @ 07/07/14 03:10 PM
Donate to BITOG
Page 2 of 4 < 1 2 3 4 >
Topic Options
#813416 - 01/18/07 06:00 PM Re: Does oil freeze????? [Re: daman]
Volvohead Offline


Registered: 05/25/05
Posts: 3550
Loc: SE Pa
Absolutely it does. But you have to get to temperatures so low that the only place they're commonly found is in a lab.

As has been said, most everything will turn to a solid below a specific temperature.

Some lubricants will also "dry out" or suffer component evaporation, depending on the atmospheric conditions (or lack thereof). I'm talking extremes here, and not just a dry Arizona day.

Ever wonder what NASA uses to lube moving parts on their interplanetary satellites? It's hundreds of degrees below zero out there (like -400F). I'd suspect dry lubricants and fully self-lubricating components and designs.

Top
#813417 - 01/18/07 06:03 PM Re: Does oil freeze????? [Re: JAG]
daman Offline


Registered: 09/23/06
Posts: 10906
Loc: Bad Axe, MI
Quote:

Not in normal winter temps. Freezing would mean you could turn it upside down and it wouldn't flow given any amount of time.




Thank you jag!!!! thats what i'm talking about normal
winter temps..
_________________________
"Always"....Mobil 1

Current fill: AFE 0w30

Top
#813418 - 01/18/07 06:06 PM Re: Does oil freeze????? [Re: daman]
daman Offline


Registered: 09/23/06
Posts: 10906
Loc: Bad Axe, MI
i do realize yea every thing will freeze at a certain point,
i juess i should have stated that in my opening post.
_________________________
"Always"....Mobil 1

Current fill: AFE 0w30

Top
#813419 - 01/18/07 06:14 PM Re: Does oil freeze????? [Re: daman]
lobo11 Offline


Registered: 04/06/04
Posts: 702
Loc: Midland, MI
I have some experience with hydraulic lubes and I have done a lot of pour point testing, in my experience in most cases I have seen oil is what I would call frozen 3-4 degrees C below its pour point, and will crystazlize there as well if it has any waxes. By frozen I mean in the testing apparatus the thermometer immersed in the oil is tough to pull out, and when it does it leaves a divot in the oil with oil from the divot stuck to the thermometer. SO if your oil lists a PP of -40 I would say based on my experience it would be what I call frozen at -45 to -42C. One true way to tell would be to run a DSC/DMS from -100 to 25 or so and get the glass transition temperature. But yes it freezes closer to the PP than most realize.

Top
#813420 - 01/18/07 06:14 PM Re: Does oil freeze????? [Re: daman]
Pablo Offline


Registered: 10/28/02
Posts: 46981
Loc: Duvall WA - Pacific NW USA
Quote:

i do realize yea every thing will freeze at a certain point,
i juess i should have stated that in my opening post.




Yes, you should have stated an actual temperature range. Also, "normal winter temps" vary widely throughout the globe.

What is the word "juess"?

Top
#813421 - 01/18/07 06:22 PM Re: Does oil freeze????? [Re: Pablo]
daman Offline


Registered: 09/23/06
Posts: 10906
Loc: Bad Axe, MI
Quote:

Quote:

i do realize yea every thing will freeze at a certain point,
i juess i should have stated that in my opening post.




Yes, you should have stated an actual temperature range. Also, "normal winter temps" vary widely throughout the globe.

What is the word "juess"?




You don't know MR. spell check????
_________________________
"Always"....Mobil 1

Current fill: AFE 0w30

Top
#813422 - 01/18/07 07:51 PM Re: Does oil freeze????? [Re: lobo11]
nascarnation Offline


Registered: 04/30/04
Posts: 632
Loc: Indiana
Quote:

I have some experience with hydraulic lubes and I have done a lot of pour point testing, in my experience in most cases I have seen oil is what I would call frozen 3-4 degrees C below its pour point, and will crystazlize there as well if it has any waxes. By frozen I mean in the testing apparatus the thermometer immersed in the oil is tough to pull out, and when it does it leaves a divot in the oil with oil from the divot stuck to the thermometer. SO if your oil lists a PP of -40 I would say based on my experience it would be what I call frozen at -45 to -42C. One true way to tell would be to run a DSC/DMS from -100 to 25 or so and get the glass transition temperature. But yes it freezes closer to the PP than most realize.




you're right on the money here
that's why the Army uses 0W20 instead of the usual 15W40 for their -60F arctic development testing

Top
#813423 - 01/18/07 08:14 PM Re: Does oil freeze????? [Re: nascarnation]
Curious Kid Offline


Registered: 02/20/05
Posts: 1183
Loc: Vermont
Sorry, but "normal", is there really such a thing? How about "average"? Even so...I digress.
_________________________
The only constant is change.

Top
#813424 - 01/18/07 08:25 PM Re: Does oil freeze????? [Re: Curious Kid]
Jett Rink Offline


Registered: 11/01/05
Posts: 317
Loc: Bristol, Tennessee
I was watching the history channel a while back, and it was a program about combat on the Russian Front. In the winter of 1941, it got so cold (we're talking 40 below zero, I think), that the Germans could not start the engines in their tanks. Engine frozen up, literally. They had footage of German panzer troops starting small fires on the ground under the tank to thaw out the oil so they could get them started. So yeah, it can freeze in severe winter conditions. I would have been curious to know what kind of oil the Germans were using then. The Russians didn't seem to be suffering this kind of problem. Perhaps the Russians, more used to dealing with lubricating engines in such severe conditons had some different oils?
_________________________
2004 BMW 325i, 66,000 miles. 7 qts. of Mobil 1 0w-40 inside.

Top
#813425 - 01/18/07 08:25 PM Re: Does oil freeze????? [Re: Curious Kid]
oilyriser Offline


Registered: 04/30/03
Posts: 7077
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Paraffin wax has a viscosity of around 5-7 cSt at 100C, and freezes at maybe 60C, so in theory you could formulate a motor oil out of it that would freeze solid after the engine cooled off.

Top
#813426 - 01/18/07 08:41 PM Re: Does oil freeze????? [Re: Pablo]
Bamaro Offline


Registered: 08/03/03
Posts: 1328
Loc: Balto.
As defined by Fahrenheit hundreds of years ago, "normal" temperatures run between 0F & 100F. Therefore oil does not freeze at "normal" temperatures.
_________________________
2015 Elantra
2009 Cobalt totaled by inattentive driver
1970 Camaro
2016 Civic
2015 Rogue
2014 Mazda3

Top
#813427 - 01/18/07 08:55 PM Re: Does oil freeze????? [Re: Pablo]
bruce381 Offline


Registered: 06/23/05
Posts: 3327
Loc: Millbrae, CA
it thickens to thwe point of being more like a havy grease or even like taffy candy.
bruce

Top
#813428 - 01/18/07 08:58 PM Re: Does oil freeze????? [Re: Jett Rink]
wavinwayne Offline


Registered: 01/06/05
Posts: 7539
Loc: North Alabama
Quote:

I was watching the history channel a while back, and it was a program about combat on the Russian Front. In the winter of 1941, it got so cold (we're talking 40 below zero, I think), that the Germans could not start the engines in their tanks. Engine frozen up, literally. They had footage of German panzer troops starting small fires on the ground under the tank to thaw out the oil so they could get them started. So yeah, it can freeze in severe winter conditions. I would have been curious to know what kind of oil the Germans were using then. The Russians didn't seem to be suffering this kind of problem. Perhaps the Russians, more used to dealing with lubricating engines in such severe conditons had some different oils?




I think I saw the same program. IIRC, the Germans began using synthetic oil at some point during the war, since it would flow much better in sub-zero temps. Someone please correct me if I'm all wet on that.
_________________________
Silence is golden, but duct tape is silver.

Top
#813429 - 01/18/07 09:02 PM Re: Does oil freeze????? [Re: Jett Rink]
TallPaul Offline


Registered: 10/22/03
Posts: 13089
Loc: By Detroit
Quote:

I was watching the history channel a while back, and it was a program about combat on the Russian Front. In the winter of 1941, it got so cold (we're talking 40 below zero, I think), that the Germans could not start the engines in their tanks. Engine frozen up, literally. They had footage of German panzer troops starting small fires on the ground under the tank to thaw out the oil so they could get them started. So yeah, it can freeze in severe winter conditions. I would have been curious to know what kind of oil the Germans were using then.


I doubt the oil in those tanks was frozen in a technical sense, just pretty thick.

Somewhere I heard that glass is not really frozen, but actually suffers creep, or at least glass in olden days, and that after many years it would be thicker at the bottom than at the top of a window.

I'm glad rocks have a very high freezing temperature. Steel too for that matter.

Often people on this site say they don't want their oil stash to freeze, meaning to experience temperatures at or below the freezing point of water, not that they actually think the oil would freeze.

Anyway, those are my thoughts, for what they are worth--and it's probably not worth much.

Top
#813430 - 01/18/07 09:24 PM Re: Does oil freeze????? [Re: Pablo]
mechtech2 Offline


Registered: 09/05/06
Posts: 19479
Loc: Chicago Area
Most oil is very good now, but some viscosities and brands will get very thick when it's really cold out. It doesn't 'freeze' in the strict sense of the word, but won't perform right as it congeals, and can most certainly cause engine damage.

Top
Page 2 of 4 < 1 2 3 4 >