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#3163188 - 10/21/13 09:24 PM Re: Using A Good Filter on a Short OCI [Re: JerryBob]
Donald Offline


Registered: 03/21/04
Posts: 13346
Loc: Upstate NY
Worry about your transmission and rust. Your engine will last 200K miles unless you beat the [censored] out of it.
_________________________
2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 4.0 - PP & M1
1999 Dodge Ram 2500 w/Cummins - Rotella T6 & M1
Amsoil ATF in both vehicles & Magnefine filter.

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#3163229 - 10/21/13 10:12 PM Re: Using A Good Filter on a Short OCI [Re: JerryBob]
Woody71 Offline


Registered: 07/22/11
Posts: 113
Loc: NE OH
Glad I found this thread. I'm switching our '98 century to 5W-30 synthetic with a NAPA Gold filter. I was debating a platinum filter but it seems overkill for a 5K OCI.

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#3163303 - 10/21/13 11:44 PM Re: Using A Good Filter on a Short OCI [Re: JerryBob]
HTSS_TR Offline


Registered: 04/17/06
Posts: 12901
Loc: Irvine, CA
I use low/medium cost filters: OCOD, Motorcraft, Purolator classic and P1 and house brands for up to 14-15k or 1 year in my 350+k miles 1994 LS400 without any problem.

Of the 2 filters: air and oil, air filter is more importance and I only use high quality OEM filter.
_________________________
'94 LS400
'00 E430
'04 S2000
"Consumerism has accustomed us to waste. But throwing food away is like stealing it from the poor and hungry" Pop Francis

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#3163388 - 10/22/13 05:41 AM Re: Using A Good Filter on a Short OCI [Re: JerryBob]
dnewton3 Offline



Registered: 05/14/07
Posts: 5571
Loc: Indianapolis, IN
Frequent filter changes are no more helpful than frequnet lube changes.

On a healthy piece of equipment, changing lube and filters often is a waste, and there is TONS of data to show that there is no tangible benefit in terms of wear reduction. To the contrary, wear actually escalates right after an O/FCI and then continues to drop as the lube and filter mature.

Yes, there is a pratical limit; you cannot run a filter and lube forever in a "normal" system. But they can go WELL past what most folks think. Whereas the typical "3 month, 3k mile" is still adhered to by many, the reality is that many lubes and filters can easily go 3x-5x further than that, if the equipment is in good shape.

So to the topic of a "cheap" filter, I'd have to ask we do a clear job of defining what "cheap" means. I would not ever use a "cheap" filter from unknown origin, with shoddy quality indicators and poor construciton. But I'd use any decent brand name base line filter for longer than most BITOGers would ever care to dream of. I ran a Puro Classic for 10k miles, and got a stellar UOA. I just finished up a 15k mile run on a standard MC FL400S; UOA data pending. I've used the OCOD for 5-7k miles with no issues whatsoever.

Jim's preliminary info regarding dP bypass events indicates that filters rarely ever plug up and blind off; it just doesn't happen with any regularity whatsoever. This is an over-rated topic and one not to be feared. Therefore capacity isn't the issue most folks think it to be.

Any decent brand name base line filter is just fine for a typical OCI and beyond. If you anticipate greatly extended OCIs and the expecation of heavy contamiantion, then a high capaicty fitler (FU, Napa Plat, etc) would suffice.


Edited by dnewton3 (10/22/13 05:44 AM)
_________________________
Conventionals vs. Synthetics isn't about which is "better"; it's about which lasts longer, while assuring safe operation, in relation to cost. Any product can be over or under utilized. The same applies to filters.
Make an informed decision; first consider your operating conditions, next determine your maintenance plan, and then pick your lube and filter. Don't do it the other way around ...

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#3163655 - 10/22/13 11:32 AM Re: Using A Good Filter on a Short OCI [Re: FetchFar]
threeputtpar Offline


Registered: 08/04/11
Posts: 1481
Loc: Appleton, WI
Originally Posted By: FetchFar
The filters out there that mix in glass fibers into a cellulose paper based media have better multipass efficiencies with slightly smaller particles, and they can hold more dirt before they completely clog up. However, remember filters miss particles in the 1 to 20 micron range, like sand or iron that can wear an engine. The only filter i know of that is specially built to grab stuff all the way down to 2 microns is the www.microgreenfilter.com filter.


Do you have any affiliation with microgreen? I've seen that you've posted their direct link on more than one occasion, but you're not a paying sponser on BITOG. I think that violates the TOU, as you need to be a paying sponser to post such links.
_________________________
2013 Honda Odyssey Touring Elite - QSUD 5W-30 and Bosch 3323 (living on the edge!)
2003 Audi A6 2.7t - M1 0W-40 and Champ PH453 (RockAuto closeout)

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#3163694 - 10/22/13 12:07 PM Re: Using A Good Filter on a Short OCI [Re: JerryBob]
Ducati996 Offline


Registered: 03/13/09
Posts: 75
Loc: Florida Ma.
Prematurely changing any filter be it oil, air or hydraulic can cause an increase in wear because filterís need to be seasoned, by that I mean a new filter will initially pass larger micron particles because the media is not perfectly uniform.
Placing it in operation will introduce contaminants that will plug the openings resulting in a filter that actually increases its ability to capture smaller particles.
There are two basic ratings for filters, flow and micron rating.
A new filter has the least flow restriction but also passes larger particles so it is less efficient at catching them.
As the filter ages the flow capacity goes down but the filters ability to capture smaller particles goes up.
This can be demonstrated by taking a shop vac and installing a new standard filter element and then vacuuming up some cold fine fire place ash. You will notice a brief puff of dust coming from the vacuum discharge.
The filterís large pores are now plugged (filter is seasoned) but the flow is greatly reduced.
The optimum scenario would be to use the filter until the flow requirements no longer meets the requirements of the equipment.
Thatís why all heavy equipment have filter minders on their air filters.

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#3163960 - 10/22/13 03:51 PM Re: Using A Good Filter on a Short OCI [Re: Ducati996]
JerryBob Offline


Registered: 04/11/13
Posts: 410
Loc: Washington, DC
Originally Posted By: Ducati996
Prematurely changing any filter be it oil, air or hydraulic can cause an increase in wear because filterís need to be seasoned, by that I mean a new filter will initially pass larger micron particles because the media is not perfectly uniform.
Placing it in operation will introduce contaminants that will plug the openings resulting in a filter that actually increases its ability to capture smaller particles.
There are two basic ratings for filters, flow and micron rating.
A new filter has the least flow restriction but also passes larger particles so it is less efficient at catching them.
As the filter ages the flow capacity goes down but the filters ability to capture smaller particles goes up.
This can be demonstrated by taking a shop vac and installing a new standard filter element and then vacuuming up some cold fine fire place ash. You will notice a brief puff of dust coming from the vacuum discharge.
The filterís large pores are now plugged (filter is seasoned) but the flow is greatly reduced.
The optimum scenario would be to use the filter until the flow requirements no longer meets the requirements of the equipment.
Thatís why all heavy equipment have filter minders on their air filters.


A couple more years, and my blue fiberglass furnace filter will be as good as a Honeywell smile
_________________________
2002 Honda Odyssey Valvoline Synpower 0w20 Fram XG Filter
2011 Toyota Tacoma TGMO 0w20 M1-102 Filter

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