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#2439816 - 11/20/11 11:50 AM non-irradiated garlic
JHZR2 Offline



Registered: 12/14/02
Posts: 33971
Loc: New Jersey
It is pretty well known that a LOT of supermarket garlic is grown in China. Most any garlic you get (all is probably right) is irradiated, which kills the growing activity within the clove, thereby stopping the production of useful, therapeutic chemicals.

I love garlic, Ill need to start growing it given all of the above. But in the meantime, anyone have any good sources of non-irradiated garlic?

Apparently "organic" isnt good enough to ensure no irradiation.

Thanks!

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#2439838 - 11/20/11 12:10 PM Re: non-irradiated garlic [Re: JHZR2]
FXjohn Offline


Registered: 05/25/07
Posts: 1236
Loc: NE Indiana
i thought most of it is grown in gilroy california

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#2439878 - 11/20/11 12:53 PM Re: non-irradiated garlic [Re: JHZR2]
tenderloin Offline


Registered: 12/16/02
Posts: 6069
Loc: Huntington Beach, CA
Look for this company.

Christopher Ranch

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#2440233 - 11/20/11 07:30 PM Re: non-irradiated garlic [Re: JHZR2]
Pablo Offline


Registered: 10/28/02
Posts: 46711
Loc: Duvall WA - Pacific NW USA
Just avoid the China junk garlic. People in China don't eat half the garbage food exported. (I just make the half part up)

Garlic? Maybe give mori a shout. He's into healthy food LOL

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#2440631 - 11/21/11 08:14 AM Re: non-irradiated garlic [Re: JHZR2]
Tom NJ Offline


Registered: 07/27/06
Posts: 1636
Loc: New Jersey & Virginia
You can get non-irradiated garlic from local growers and online, but I suggest you grow your own.

I have been growing garlic for over 30 years and have 220 cloves in the ground right now. It is incredibly easy to grow and now is the time to plant - I can give instructions if anyone wants it.

I suggest planting hardneck varieties which can be found at local farm markets, garlic festivals/gatherings, or online. Hardnecks put up a seed stalk called a "scape" which are delicious when fried or grilled, so it delivers two crops. Hardnecks also usually have fewer but larger cloves that are easier to peel than the softneck supermarket type, and are better tasting.

Tom NJ

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#2440757 - 11/21/11 10:54 AM Re: non-irradiated garlic [Re: JHZR2]
Drew99GT Online   happy


Registered: 10/11/02
Posts: 20813
Loc: Colorado Springs
The bulk garlic I get at the local grocery store comes from Mexico and it's apparently not irradiated. I have a head of garlic that's about 2 weeks old and it's growing green shoots out of it.

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#2440802 - 11/21/11 11:30 AM Re: non-irradiated garlic [Re: Tom NJ]
JHZR2 Offline



Registered: 12/14/02
Posts: 33971
Loc: New Jersey
Originally Posted By: Tom NJ
I can give instructions if anyone wants it.



Yes, please!

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#2440930 - 11/21/11 01:27 PM Re: non-irradiated garlic [Re: JHZR2]
Tom NJ Offline


Registered: 07/27/06
Posts: 1636
Loc: New Jersey & Virginia
Originally Posted By: JHZR2
Originally Posted By: Tom NJ
I can give instructions if anyone wants it.



Yes, please!


First off, buy large bulbs and only plant the larger cloves. Use any small cloves for cooking. Unlike many other vegetables, large cloves from large bulbs will grow large bulbs. Within a couple of days before planting, gently break the cloves from the bulbs by breaking the paper-like bulb wrappers and pulling the cloves down and away. No need to peel the cloves.

Prepare the soil in a sunny location by turning deeply and incorporating some balanced fertilizer such as a 10-10-10. Garlic especially likes nitrogen (first number).

Garlic is planted in the Fall, usually in October or November, but I have planted successfully as late as mid December. The idea is to give the roots about 4-6 weeks to grow before a hard ground freeze.

Plant the cloves flat side down (pointy side up) about 2-3" deep, with 6" spacing between cloves. Rows should be 12" apart.

Firm the soil gently around the cloves to remove air, water the bed, and cover it with a thick layer of mulch. I use about 6" of straw, but 4" of a mix of well chopped leaves and grass clippings is also fine. Garlic will push through pretty much any loose type mulch, but avoid materials that will mat down like whole leaves. Depending on when you plant you may see the garlic plants poking through the mulch before winter. No worries, garlic can take the cold and snow, and indeed likes it. You are now done until Spring.

Come March in New England the garlic will emerge from the mulch. At this time, apply more fertilizer, about 1/2 cup of 10-10-10 per 10' row. Repeat the fertilizer in mid April and again in early May, then no more.

I early June the garlic will send up seed stalks (scapes) which will curl to form a full or partial circle. When the scapes are about 18" long, snap them off near where they emerge from the plant, being careful to not break any leaves. Scapes are delicious raw in salads, and even better stir fried or grilled.

Harvest the garlic when about 1/2 to 3/4 of the leaves are yellow/brown by digging them up (don't pull them up by the leaves). Each leaf represents a wrapper layer around the bulb, so if you let all of the leaves die the bulbs may lose their wrappers and not store well.

After digging the bulbs up, brush off most of the dirt - some people wash the garlic bulbs immediately after digging but more recommend just brushing them. Then allow them to cure by setting them in a well ventilated place protected from the sun and rain. Most people hang them in a barn or under a patio roof, but you can lay them on a table as well, preferably outdoors. After about 3-4 weeks of curing, cut off the leaves and roots, leaving about 1/2" of each and brush off any remaining dirt. Store the bulbs in a cool place such as a cellar, but not in the refrigerator.

Here are some links with more details on growing garlic:

We Grow Garlic

Gourmet Garlic Gardens

The Daily Green

Boundary Garlic Farm

Tom NJ

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