Recent Topics
Amsoil EA15K50 or Fram Ultra XG10060?
by GM4LIFE
10 minutes 25 seconds ago
Sunoco gasoline
by Chuckinator
20 minutes 19 seconds ago
Burning smell after driving
by llmercll
21 minutes 12 seconds ago
Wagner ThermoQuiet Or QuickStop?
by Warstud
32 minutes 17 seconds ago
Will I Destroy my Parking Brake?
by SumpChump
33 minutes 46 seconds ago
Fetch Boy Fetch..
by Warstud
48 minutes 25 seconds ago
What kind of flower is this?
by tinmanSC
Today at 03:38 PM
Yokohama Geolander HTS & ATS experiences?
by 01rangerxl
Today at 03:04 PM
Pro-Tec filters?
by leroyd92
Today at 02:17 PM
Cooper CS5 Ultra- Ultra Cheap
by clarkflower
Today at 01:39 PM
TEOST 33C - any relation to DI Intake deposits?
by jrustles
Today at 12:42 PM
kudos to ford
by ram_man
Today at 12:34 PM
Newest Members
mckeven, Edsel, ROVjr, Dieseltrooper88, bluearc74
51389 Registered Users
Who's Online
111 registered (andrewlg, 440Magnum, 1foxracing, 901Memphis, 2010_FX4, 97tbird, 12 invisible), 1688 Guests and 226 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Stats
51389 Members
64 Forums
219715 Topics
3467805 Posts

Max Online: 2862 @ 07/07/14 03:10 PM
Donate to BITOG

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >
Topic Options
#1694952 - 12/04/09 10:50 AM What is considered to be a good cold pour point?
ryan2022 Offline


Registered: 06/05/06
Posts: 1198
Loc: Calgary
Hi guys,

I was thinking about cold pour points of different oils.

there are oils that I would have loved to try in the past, but it gets pretty cold up here, and I've swayed away from them.

Mobil super 1000 comes to mind. Its cold pour point for their 5w30 and 10w30 is around -30 C. Thats pretty conservative if you ask me. Most of the newer dino oils are around -36 or so.

I'm running synthetic now, but just thought, If I ever switched back, how important is it to cold starts?

It hits -25 the odd time in this are of ontario. Usually just in the morning, but the oil has to be pretty thick at those temps.

Thoughts?

Ryan
_________________________
2008 BMW X3 3.0si Castrol Edge 5w40
2006 Nissan Murano SE Pennzoil platinum 5w30

Top
#1694958 - 12/04/09 10:54 AM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour point? [Re: ryan2022]
addyguy Offline


Registered: 09/08/05
Posts: 13427
Loc: Canada
The Petro-Canada 'dino' (wink, wink) 5W-30 I'm using has a PP of -42C - it's actually lower that the synthetic's PP of -39C!

:P
_________________________
2003 Mazda Tribute LX V-6, 171k miles.
Oil: QS Defy 5W-20; Fram Ultra XG2 filter.

Top
#1694963 - 12/04/09 10:58 AM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour point? [Re: ryan2022]
d00df00d Offline


Registered: 10/20/05
Posts: 9160
Loc: PA
Anything lower than the lowest temp you expect to see. wink

Remember, pour point doesn't say anything about cold viscosity. Think about how water behaves just 1 degree above its freezing point...
_________________________
2011 Mazda RX-8 R3
Castrol GTX 5w-20

Top
#1695016 - 12/04/09 11:47 AM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour point? [Re: d00df00d]
sangyup81 Offline


Registered: 10/24/09
Posts: 1645
Loc: Bowie, MD
if you're worried so much, go for a synthetic since those have pour points like -50 or -60
_________________________
00 Camry 122k/125k PeakSyn5w30 Bosch3311
03 Tribute V6 144k/146k MaxLife5w20 M1-210
10 Mazda3 36k/40k XOM10w30 FL300
10 Accord 10k/10k GTX5w20 Puro14610

Top
#1695023 - 12/04/09 11:50 AM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour point? [Re: sangyup81]
d00df00d Offline


Registered: 10/20/05
Posts: 9160
Loc: PA
Not all of them. There are a LOT in the -40s, and many (including some of the best) in the -30s.
_________________________
2011 Mazda RX-8 R3
Castrol GTX 5w-20

Top
#1695035 - 12/04/09 12:06 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour point? [Re: d00df00d]
heypete Offline


Registered: 10/14/09
Posts: 402
Loc: Tucson, AZ
Based on the temperature you state, it might be worthwhile to invest in an engine block heater or some other mechanism to keep the oil warmer than the ambient temperature when you start up.

A heated garage might be good too. :)
_________________________
2006 Toyota Camry LE (4-cyl, auto, 2AZ-FE) | Mobil Clean 5000 5W-30

Top
#1695082 - 12/04/09 01:04 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour point? [Re: ryan2022]
ryan2022 Offline


Registered: 06/05/06
Posts: 1198
Loc: Calgary
Thanks guys.

WEll, I'm not too worried, The Amsoil XL in 10w30 and 5w20, is something like -40 and -45 respectively.

Addyguy,

Now THAT is what Im talking about. That's the best PP of any dino so far. I remember hearing about that a while back. I just wish it was easier/ cheaper to find.

The only place I can get it is at the gas station for like 5 bucks a litre.....
_________________________
2008 BMW X3 3.0si Castrol Edge 5w40
2006 Nissan Murano SE Pennzoil platinum 5w30

Top
#1695091 - 12/04/09 01:12 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour point? [Re: ryan2022]
addyguy Offline


Registered: 09/08/05
Posts: 13427
Loc: Canada
ryan,

If you go to a 'Benson Auto Parts' and buy some AC Delco engine oil, it is re-labeled PC dino oil. Also, if you go to a GM dealership and buy 'genuine GM oil', it is also PC oil. I've read in many places that PC makes GM oils in Canada.
_________________________
2003 Mazda Tribute LX V-6, 171k miles.
Oil: QS Defy 5W-20; Fram Ultra XG2 filter.

Top
#1695101 - 12/04/09 01:20 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour point? [Re: addyguy]
ryan2022 Offline


Registered: 06/05/06
Posts: 1198
Loc: Calgary
Hi Addyguy, great to know.

I've been to Benson a few times, good guys in there.

Man, you must be local!

I'll do that, If my Amsoil fund dries up. LOL.

Does the same go for their gear oils?

The Petro Canada Syn blend 80w140 looks like my dream gear oil.



Edited by ryan2022 (12/04/09 01:20 PM)
_________________________
2008 BMW X3 3.0si Castrol Edge 5w40
2006 Nissan Murano SE Pennzoil platinum 5w30

Top
#1695107 - 12/04/09 01:26 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: d00df00d]
E365 Offline


Registered: 12/16/07
Posts: 222
Loc: Minnesota
Originally Posted By: d00df00d
Anything lower than the lowest temp you expect to see. wink

Remember, pour point doesn't say anything about cold viscosity. Think about how water behaves just 1 degree above its freezing point...


I still can't totally wrap my head around how pour-point and the cold cranking simulation test (ASTM D5293) relate. It just seems that the numbers would somewhat relate. The lower pour-point oils would be the 0w & 5w oils, and vice versa. That's just what me brain comes up with (erroneously, I think).

Then you have something like Tection Extra. It's a 15w-40, but has a pour point of -42C/-44F. You'd think an oil that "pours" that cold could achieve something better than a 15w rating.

Can anyone enlighten me? smile2


Edited by E365 (12/04/09 01:32 PM)
_________________________
1996 BMW 318ti - 231,000 miles
2001 BMW F650GS - 35,000 miles
2003 MINI Cooper - 98,000 miles



Top
#1695112 - 12/04/09 01:30 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour point? [Re: ryan2022]
addyguy Offline


Registered: 09/08/05
Posts: 13427
Loc: Canada
Originally Posted By: ryan2022
Hi Addyguy, great to know.

I've been to Benson a few times, good guys in there.

Man, you must be local!

I'll do that, If my Amsoil fund dries up. LOL.

Does the same go for their gear oils?

The Petro Canada Syn blend 80w140 looks like my dream gear oil.



Not THAT close - I'm up in Ottawa, about 4hrs away. That said, I have friends that live in the that area, so I've spent a fair bit of time there. Nice area!

Don't know much about their gear oils, sorry!
_________________________
2003 Mazda Tribute LX V-6, 171k miles.
Oil: QS Defy 5W-20; Fram Ultra XG2 filter.

Top
#1695157 - 12/04/09 02:07 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: E365]
ryan2022 Offline


Registered: 06/05/06
Posts: 1198
Loc: Calgary
ahh,

we have friends up in Ottawa.

Peterborough has some nice places, and some not so nice places.

We ARE lucky that we have a lot of water around. They just need to clean up the downtown!

Ottawa is spotless in comparison.

Thanks again.
_________________________
2008 BMW X3 3.0si Castrol Edge 5w40
2006 Nissan Murano SE Pennzoil platinum 5w30

Top
#1695172 - 12/04/09 02:15 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: E365]
d00df00d Offline


Registered: 10/20/05
Posts: 9160
Loc: PA
Originally Posted By: E365
Originally Posted By: d00df00d
Anything lower than the lowest temp you expect to see. wink

Remember, pour point doesn't say anything about cold viscosity. Think about how water behaves just 1 degree above its freezing point...


I still can't totally wrap my head around how pour-point and the cold cranking simulation test (ASTM D5293) relate. It just seems that the numbers would somewhat relate. The lower pour-point oils would be the 0w & 5w oils, and vice versa. That's just what me brain comes up with (erroneously, I think).

Then you have something like Tection Extra. It's a 15w-40, but has a pour point of -42C/-44F. You'd think an oil that "pours" that cold could achieve something better than a 15w rating.

Can anyone enlighten me? smile2

Pour point is a few degrees above the point at which the oil stops flowing.

Winter ratings relate to how thick they are when cold.

Here's a way to think of it. A 20w-50 with a pour point of -40C is like honey: as you cool it, it gradually thickens and slowly freezes up. A 0w-20 with a pour point of -30C is like water: it stays fluid until you get down to 0C, and then suddenly freezes.
_________________________
2011 Mazda RX-8 R3
Castrol GTX 5w-20

Top
#1695198 - 12/04/09 02:32 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: d00df00d]
E365 Offline


Registered: 12/16/07
Posts: 222
Loc: Minnesota
Yes, that totally makes sense. Thank you.
_________________________
1996 BMW 318ti - 231,000 miles
2001 BMW F650GS - 35,000 miles
2003 MINI Cooper - 98,000 miles



Top
#1695206 - 12/04/09 02:39 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: E365]
bigmike Offline


Registered: 06/05/09
Posts: 3239
Loc: Florida
A good pour point for me is around 20 degrees F. Coffee
_________________________
Take care,
-Mike

2006 Chevy Silverado LT 4.8 - QS 5w30, Napa Gold
2009 Honda Accord LX-P 2.4 - QS UD 0w20, P1 14610

Top
#1695245 - 12/04/09 03:20 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: E365]
d00df00d Offline


Registered: 10/20/05
Posts: 9160
Loc: PA
Originally Posted By: E365
Yes, that totally makes sense. Thank you.

...except a 0w-20 with a pour point of -30 C doesn't freeze at 0C. Sorry about that. duh

But yeah, you get the idea. thumbsup
_________________________
2011 Mazda RX-8 R3
Castrol GTX 5w-20

Top
#1695265 - 12/04/09 03:38 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: ryan2022]
OVERKILL Offline


Registered: 04/28/08
Posts: 26166
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: ryan2022
ahh,

we have friends up in Ottawa.

Peterborough has some nice places, and some not so nice places.

We ARE lucky that we have a lot of water around. They just need to clean up the downtown!

Ottawa is spotless in comparison.

Thanks again.


Meh, its not THAT bad here wink

East City is really nice in a lot of spots, I live in the old part of town, which is nice too.
_________________________
Network Engineer
02 Expedition
01 BMW ///M5
06 Charger R/T

Top
#1695288 - 12/04/09 03:56 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour point? [Re: ryan2022]
Tom NJ Offline


Registered: 07/27/06
Posts: 1619
Loc: New Jersey & Virginia
Hello Ryan,

Here is an excerpt from a post on pour points I made a few years back that may be helpful. You can read the full thread at: http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubb...0796#Post750796

"Is there any "formula" for converting an oil's pour point to actual usage temperatures?"

I would not trust any such formula. Pour point measures the temperature at which the oil stops pouring under its own weight, that is, under low shear conditions. In the engine, oils are sucked and pumped, which is much higher shear conditions and does not correlate to pour point. This is why the specifications call for CCS and MRV viscosity measurements instead of pour point.

Imagine a bowl of Jell-O. If you tilt the bowl, the Jell-O will wobble and perhaps sag a bit, but it does not flow out of the bowl like a liquid. This lack of flow would suggest that the Jell-O is a solid that would not flow where needed. Now take a spoon and stir, and the Jell-O will move fairly freely under the force (shear) of your hand. Then take wide straw and suck the Jell-O - again the Jell-O will flow up the straw under this vacuum force, but it will not flow back into fill the hole you sucked out. In other words, applying a force to an apparent solid material can cause it to flow and pump, even though it cannot do so under its own weight. The reason is that the Jell-O has a weak crystalline structure that breaks easily under force (shear) and reverts back to a liquid like substance that can be easily moved.

A similar situation exists with motor oils since mineral oils have waxes that grow crystals under certain temperature conditions, causing a "freeze point" as opposed to a "pour point". The difference is that "pouring" stops when the viscosity rises to a point that the oil is just too stiff to flow, while "freezing" occurs when the crystal structure from the waxes "knits" the oil into a weak solid, sort of like Jell-O. Crystal growth in oils requires a very slow cool down to occur, often with a pause or soak period. The pour point test cools at a relatively fast rate that can "super cool" the fluid, that is, it whizzes (technical term) right on past its freeze point and runs to its pour point, missing any freezing along the way.

The CCS test stirs the oil (applies shearing force) during the cool down and better simulates the shear rates of the oil pump than a simple pour point. The MRV test cools at a very slow rate with less shear and catches the effect of any freezing tendency.

Back in 1981 Quaker State had an oil that caused over 1,000 engines to seize due to these effects. The oil had a good pour point and CCS viscosity and could be readily sucked up and pumped by the oil pump when cold. However, their VI improver caused crystal growth under certain cooling conditions, turning the oil into a Jell-O like consistency in the pan. Then when the pump sucked the oil up from the reservoir in the pan, it created a hole and the oil was not able to flow back in and fill the hole. The pump then sucked air and the engines seized within minutes from oil starvation. This freezing phenomenon was prevalent and well documented in the Sioux Falls area where the temperatures during the failures cooled very slowly and paused for a while at about +10-15F. When simulated in the lab, the otherwise passing oil exhibited a freezing tendency. This temperature profile was referred to as the "Sioux Falls Cycle" and formed the basis of the cooling cycle used in the MRV test, which was then added to the J300 spec. QS owned up to the problem and paid the claims.

Tom NJ

Top
#1695310 - 12/04/09 04:09 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: bigmike]
Cyprs Offline


Registered: 06/11/04
Posts: 907
Loc: Canada
Watch out for pour point claims, I have two bottles of oil in my freezer right now for months, the freezer temp is probably about -5C, (guessing)

In one bottle I have 15-40 Boss Blue Ram Conventional with claim pour point of -42C, in the other bottle is 0-40 XD3 syn with claim of -45C or -52F.

I am running this 15-40 Blue Ram with TBN of 14 all summer, I was also considering running this Blue Ram in my truck this winter after hearing the amazing -42C pour point, infact the Boss rep recommended I use the Blue Ram all winter rather than switching to syn oil.

I fully understand the better flow of syn over conventional, but remember the Boss claim of -42C pour point, when I tip both frozen beer bottles of oil over similtaneously the XD3 hits the bottom and is completely drained except a light film on side of bottle and in that duration the Boss oil is 1/2 way to the bottom of bottle and layered 1/4" thick in a glob on side of bottle. I can easily drain the XD3 syn back and forth 2-3 times before the Blue Ram just barely touches the bottom. I expected better from the Boss oil considering the freezer temp is only about -5C and Boss claims nearly equal point XD3 syn.

I now test all oils this way, I always keep the XD3 in bottle in freezer and if I do consider to try any different brand other than XD3 syn then I pour a new oil in a new bottle and compare it to XD3 syn a few days later. If it does not measure up to XD3 syn in -5C then I dont trust it in -40 C or F.

I use clear miller high life beer bottles with saran wrap and elastic band to seal top, works great to view how different oils pour cold.

Freezer oil tests are not new to Bitog, I learned to do this test here in Bitog, good idea to see first hand with this simple freeze test on oil if one lives in a harsh climate like mine. Simply find a proven highly rated and PROVEN pour point oil like XD3 syn, if for any reason one considers another different oil then use this freezer test, at about -5C one gets a pretty good idea on how the oil measures up. I have also tested XD3 syn when -45C outside, it does flow, considering Blue Ram flow at -5C I dont believe it would move in -42C as claimed in my opinion. I will take both these bottles out of freezer and set them outside this winter when it hits -40 or lower and tip them over, sounds like another cold one comming this year so I will have lots opportunity.

Cyprs
_________________________
2005 Nissan X-trail
1987 Nissan King Cab
1992 Dodge Cummins Diesel
1986 Toyota 4X4 Pickup 22R

Top
#1695328 - 12/04/09 04:17 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: Cyprs]
Cyprs Offline


Registered: 06/11/04
Posts: 907
Loc: Canada
TomNJ, interesting post, your post entered before I submitted my post, had I seen your post first I would have learned rather than post my two cents. I am going to start learning more on and paying more attention to CCS and MRV specs over pour point.

Cyprs
_________________________
2005 Nissan X-trail
1987 Nissan King Cab
1992 Dodge Cummins Diesel
1986 Toyota 4X4 Pickup 22R

Top
#1695424 - 12/04/09 05:17 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour point? [Re: Tom NJ]
Greggy_D Offline


Registered: 03/03/05
Posts: 1532
Loc: Near Ann Arbor, Michigan
Originally Posted By: Tom NJ
Hello Ryan,

Here is an excerpt from a post on pour points I made a few years back that may be helpful. You can read the full thread at: http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubb...0796#Post750796


[snip]

Tom NJ


Awesome, awesome post.
_________________________
Greggy D.


Top
#1695435 - 12/04/09 05:25 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: bigmike]
PT1 Offline


Registered: 02/06/07
Posts: 5746
Loc: near the mistake
Originally Posted By: bigmike
A good pour point for me is around 20 degrees F. Coffee


Me too...when it hits -10F I pour a hot coffee and stay inside... Coffee2
_________________________
Oils well that ends well...

Top
#1695437 - 12/04/09 05:25 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: bigmike]
Gary Allan Offline


Registered: 09/28/02
Posts: 39806
Loc: Pottstown, PA
Quote:
What is considered to be a good cold pour point



Enough colder than your real temp extremes to make you feel that you're getting (that all too essential) "something extra" for the price you paid for it.
_________________________
http://lube-direct.com/gallan/

Top
#1696228 - 12/05/09 10:36 AM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: Gary Allan]
tuckman Offline


Registered: 11/02/08
Posts: 397
Loc: Elk Point, Alberta
I would agree with Gary. Also look for good cold CCS and MRV #'s.

I also found an interesting chart when looking up Esso XD3 specs.

*NOTE* These temps are only valid with the Esso XD3 line of oils. Others may differ GREATLY! As shown in the post about the Boss oil cold pour test.

Grade Expected Low Ambient Temperature
15W-40 -29C
10W-30 -35C
5W-30 -40C
0W-40 -46C
0W-30 -48C

taken from
http://www.esso.ca/Canada-English/Files/Products_Lubes/IOCAENCVLESEsso_Xd-3_extra.pdf

I would think it would be better to put the 15W-40 at -20C or -25C after looking at the MRV #'s but still it seems that Esso is confident in their oil.

After saying all of that I am still a real believer in 0W oils even at -20 I can tell the difference in how fast my vehicles turn over. When I choose my winter oils I put pour point on the bottom of the list of specs but it still plays into the equation.
_________________________
05 Ford Excursion 6.0L, PSD Esso XD3 0w-30
92 Ford Exploder 4x4 4.0L, Esso XD3 0w-40
86 Toyota Truck 2wd 22RE(2.4L), Esso XD3 0W-40

Top
#1696419 - 12/05/09 02:13 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: tuckman]
SubLGT Offline


Registered: 01/31/06
Posts: 1785
Loc: Idaho
IMO pour point is a useless cold weather performance spec. Good for marketing purposes only. Look at CCS and MRV.

Top
#1697333 - 12/06/09 07:14 AM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: SubLGT]
ryan2022 Offline


Registered: 06/05/06
Posts: 1198
Loc: Calgary
Good posts guys.

Sorry i forgot to check back for a while.

Thanks for all the info.

the thing I find confusing about CCS and MRV, is that they list their performance for different temps across the different viscosities. eg.... 5w30 = 5600@ -35, 10w30 = 6200 @ -30
_________________________
2008 BMW X3 3.0si Castrol Edge 5w40
2006 Nissan Murano SE Pennzoil platinum 5w30

Top
#1697407 - 12/06/09 08:50 AM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: ryan2022]
tuckman Offline


Registered: 11/02/08
Posts: 397
Loc: Elk Point, Alberta
Originally Posted By: ryan2022
Good posts guys.

Sorry i forgot to check back for a while.

Thanks for all the info.

the thing I find confusing about CCS and MRV, is that they list their performance for different temps across the different viscosities. eg.... 5w30 = 5600@ -35, 10w30 = 6200 @ -30


The temperature values given in the CCS viscosity are directly related to the given MRV viscosity and/or the MRV LPT (funny thing is that the MRV LPT #'s on XD3 oils are a couple deg. cooler than their pour points). So the colder you can pump the oil at (MRV), the colder you can measure the cold cranking visc. (CCS).


Edited by tuckman (12/06/09 08:51 AM)
_________________________
05 Ford Excursion 6.0L, PSD Esso XD3 0w-30
92 Ford Exploder 4x4 4.0L, Esso XD3 0w-40
86 Toyota Truck 2wd 22RE(2.4L), Esso XD3 0W-40

Top
#1697958 - 12/06/09 05:34 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: tuckman]
ryan2022 Offline


Registered: 06/05/06
Posts: 1198
Loc: Calgary
Originally Posted By: tuckman
Originally Posted By: ryan2022
Good posts guys.

Sorry i forgot to check back for a while.

Thanks for all the info.

the thing I find confusing about CCS and MRV, is that they list their performance for different temps across the different viscosities. eg.... 5w30 = 5600@ -35, 10w30 = 6200 @ -30


The temperature values given in the CCS viscosity are directly related to the given MRV viscosity and/or the MRV LPT (funny thing is that the MRV LPT #'s on XD3 oils are a couple deg. cooler than their pour points). So the colder you can pump the oil at (MRV), the colder you can measure the cold cranking visc. (CCS).


Interesting. That makes it a bit more clear....now ive got soem research to do!

Thanks
_________________________
2008 BMW X3 3.0si Castrol Edge 5w40
2006 Nissan Murano SE Pennzoil platinum 5w30

Top
#1699146 - 12/07/09 04:11 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: ryan2022]
ottotheclown Offline


Registered: 06/21/09
Posts: 2040
Loc: new york
Who is his or hers right mind would be in a car at -30 ?.Possibly someone who was drunk or someone who was dead or Sarah Palin spying on Russia.

Top
#1699160 - 12/07/09 04:30 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: ottotheclown]
d00df00d Offline


Registered: 10/20/05
Posts: 9160
Loc: PA
Originally Posted By: ottotheclown
Who is his or hers right mind would be in a car at -30 ?

If it was -30 out, and I had to go somewhere, I would be in a car. wink
_________________________
2011 Mazda RX-8 R3
Castrol GTX 5w-20

Top
#1699439 - 12/07/09 08:04 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: ottotheclown]
tuckman Offline


Registered: 11/02/08
Posts: 397
Loc: Elk Point, Alberta
Originally Posted By: ottotheclown
Who is his or hers right mind would be in a car at -30 ?.Possibly someone who was drunk or someone who was dead or Sarah Palin spying on Russia.


-37C overnight last night in my neck of the woods.
It's the drunks you see out walking on the road in the -30's. the rest of us are in our cars/trucks staying warm.
_________________________
05 Ford Excursion 6.0L, PSD Esso XD3 0w-30
92 Ford Exploder 4x4 4.0L, Esso XD3 0w-40
86 Toyota Truck 2wd 22RE(2.4L), Esso XD3 0W-40

Top
#1699999 - 12/08/09 10:07 AM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: ottotheclown]
Samilcar Offline


Registered: 07/11/08
Posts: 1478
Loc: Iowa
Originally Posted By: ottotheclown
Who is his or hers right mind would be in a car at -30 ?.



Employed people?

Top
#1700176 - 12/08/09 12:40 PM Re: What is considered to be a good cold pour poin [Re: ottotheclown]
wolfc70 Offline


Registered: 04/13/07
Posts: 360
Loc: Wisconsin
Originally Posted By: ottotheclown
Who is his or hers right mind would be in a car at -30 ?.


Just because it is cold does not mean places shut down. No matter the temp, I still have to show up at work. Believe it or not, cars will start in very cold weather! Cheers1
_________________________
2011 Honda Accord EX Saloon, Manual, K24Z3, Toyota Synthetic 0w-20, Napa Gold 7356
2008 Pontiac Vibe 1ZZFE, PP 5w-20, Federated LF410F

Top
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >